Around 62% of all Internet sites will run an unsupported PHP version in 10 weeks

According to statistics from W3Techs, roughly 78.9 percent of all Internet sites today run on PHP.

But on December 31, 2018, security support for PHP 5.6.x will officially cease, marking the end of all support for any version of the ancient PHP 5.x branch.This means that starting with next year, around 62 percent of all Internet sites still running a PHP 5.x version will stop receiving security updates for their server and website’s underlying technology, exposing hundreds of millions of websites, if not more, to serious security risks.If a hacker finds a vulnerability in PHP after the New Year, lots of sites and users would be at risk.”This is a huge problem for the PHP ecosystem,” Scott Arciszewski, Chief Development Officer at Paragon Initiative Enterprise, told ZDNet in an interview. “While many feel that they can ‘get away with’ running PHP 5 in 2019, the simplest way to describe


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/feedsapi/BwPx/~3/_gk6r0uO65c/

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The Magic Leap Con

Reader merbs shares a report about Magic Leap, a US-based startup valued at north of $6 billion and which counts Google, Alibaba, Warner Bros, AT&T, and several top Silicon Valley venture capital firms as its investors. The company, which held its first developer conference this week, announced that it is making its $2,295 AR headset available in more states in the United States. Journalist Brian Merchant attended the conference and shares the other part of the story. From a story: After spending two days at LEAPcon, I feel it is my duty — in the name of instilling a modicum of sanity into an age where a company that has never actually sold a product to a consumer can be worth a billion dollars more than the entire GDP of Fiji — to inform you that it is not. Magic Leap clearly wants its public launch to appear huge —


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/bHN9h2IKjkg/the-magic-leap-con

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Firefox Removes Core Product Support For RSS/Atom Feeds

Starting with Firefox 64, RSS/Atom feed support will be handled via add-ons, rather than in-product. Mozilla’s Gijs Kruitbosch writes: After considering the maintenance, performance and security costs of the feed preview and subscription features in Firefox, we’ve concluded that it is no longer sustainable to keep feed support in the core of the product. While we still believe in RSS and support the goals of open, interoperable formats on the Web, we strongly believe that the best way to meet the needs of RSS and its users is via WebExtensions. With that in mind, we have decided to remove the built-in feed preview feature, subscription UI, and the “live bookmarks” support from the core of Firefox, now that improved replacements for those features are available via add-ons. By virtue of being baked into the core of Firefox, these features have long had outsized maintenance and security costs relative to their


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/H413NCXp-PI/firefox-removes-core-product-support-for-rssatom-feeds

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Show HN: WebRTC signalling data using QR codes

Using QR codes to share signalling data between two devices a WebRTC connection is established.
Open up https://webrtc-qr.surge.sh in a desktop browser and in a mobile browser.
In either browser choose Host and in the other one Join
The browser that hosts will show a series of QR codes (the data for the signalling offer plus some metadata to read it on the other device)
When the guest device (the one that joined) shows a series of QR codes it means it has read the offer and it is showing the signalling answer. Point the qr codes towards the host device so that it can read the qr codes.
When the connection is established a chime will ring (not in Mobile Safari though) and the devices will be connected.
For the time being a semi-transparent video is shown to help point the QR codes towards the center of the scanning device – this needs improvement.
Dev

Build


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Firefox removes core product support for RSS/Atom feeds

TL;DR: from Firefox 64 onwards, RSS/Atom feed support will be handled via add-ons, rather than in-product.
What is happening?
After considering the maintenance, performance and security costs of the feed preview and subscription features in Firefox, we’ve concluded that it is no longer sustainable to keep feed support in the core of the product. While we still believe in RSS and support the goals of open, interoperable formats on the Web, we strongly believe that the best way to meet the needs of RSS and its users is via WebExtensions.
With that in mind, we have decided to remove the built-in feed preview feature, subscription UI, and the “live bookmarks” support from the core of Firefox, now that improved replacements for those features are available via add-ons.
Why are you doing this?
By virtue of being baked into the core of Firefox, these features have long had outsized maintenance and security costs relative to their


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/feedsapi/BwPx/~3/0EPOgPWl-iw/

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FCC Tells Court It Has No ‘Legal Authority’ To Impose Net Neutrality Rules

The Federal Communications Commission opened its defense of its net neutrality repeal yesterday, telling a court that it has no authority to keep the net neutrality rules in place. From a report: Chairman Ajit Pai’s FCC argued that broadband is not a “telecommunications service” as defined in federal law, and therefore it must be classified as an information service instead. As an information service, broadband cannot be subject to common carrier regulations such as net neutrality rules, Pai’s FCC said. The FCC is only allowed to impose common carrier regulations on telecommunications services. “Given these classification decisions, the Commission determined that the Communications Act does not endow it with legal authority to retain the former conduct rules,” the FCC said in a summary of its defense filed yesterday in the US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. The FCC is defending the net neutrality repeal against a


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/vKqXdSIxqFc/fcc-tells-court-it-has-no-legal-authority-to-impose-net-neutrality-rules

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Here’s how to find out if your Facebook was hacked in the breach

Are you one of the 30 million users hit by Facebook’s access token breach announced two weeks ago? Here’s how to find out.

Facebook breach saw 15M users’ names & contact info accessed, 14M’s bios too

Visit this Facebook Help center link while logged in: https://www.facebook.com/help/securitynotice?ref=sec.
Scroll down to the section “Is my Facebook account impacted by this security issue?”
Here you’ll see a Yes or No answer to whether your account was one of the 30 million users impacted. Those affected will also receive a warning like this atop their News Feed:
If Yes, you’ll be in one of three categories:
A. You’re in the 15 million users’ whose name plus email and/or phone number was accessed.
B. You’re in the 14 million users’ who had that data plus account bio data accessed including “username, gender, locale/language, relationship status, religion, hometown, self-reported current city, birthdate, device types used to access Facebook, education, work, the last 10 places they


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FCC tells court it has no “legal authority” to impose net neutrality rules

Enlarge / FCC Chairman Ajit Pai speaks to the media after the vote to repeal net neutrality rules on December 14, 2017. (credit: Getty Images | Alex Wong )
The Federal Communications Commission opened its defense of its net neutrality repeal yesterday, telling a court that it has no authority to keep the net neutrality rules in place.
Chairman Ajit Pai’s FCC argued that broadband is not a “telecommunications service” as defined in federal law, and therefore it must be classified as an information service instead. As an information service, broadband cannot be subject to common carrier regulations such as net neutrality rules, Pai’s FCC said. The FCC is only allowed to impose common carrier regulations on telecommunications services.
“Given these classification decisions, the Commission determined that the Communications Act does not endow it with legal authority to retain the former conduct rules,” the FCC said in a summary of its defense


Original URL: https://arstechnica.com/?p=1393399

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