The next version of HTTP won’t be using TCP

Enlarge (credit: Andy Maguire / Flickr)
The next version of the Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP)—the network protocol that defines how browsers talk to Web servers—is going to make a major break from the versions in use today.
Today’s HTTP (versions 1.0, 1.1, and 2) are all layered on top of TCP (Transmission Control Protocol). TCP, defined as part of the core set of IP (Internet Protocol) layers, provides reliable, ordered, and error-checked delivery of data over an IP network. “Reliable” means that if some data goes missing during transfer (due to a hardware failure, congestion, or a timeout), the receiving end can detect this and demand that the sending end re-send the missing data; “ordered” means that data is received in the order that it was transmitted in; “error-checked” means that any corruption during transmission can be detected.
These are all desirable properties and necessary for a protocol such as HTTP, but


Original URL: https://arstechnica.com/?p=1410285  

Original article

Firefox 63 blocks tracking cookies, offers a VPN when you need one

Firefox 63, out today, includes the first iteration of what Mozilla is calling Enhanced Tracking Protection (ETP), a feature to improve privacy and stop your activity across the Web from being tracked.
Tracking cookies store some kind of unique identifier that represents your browser. The cookie is tied to a third-party domain—the domain of the tracking company, rather than the site you’re visiting. Each site you visit that embeds the tracking cookie will allow the tracking company to see the sites you visit and, using that unique identifier, cross-reference different visits to different sites to build a picture of your online behavior.

The new option to block third-party tracking cookies but permit other third-party cookies. (credit: Mozilla)

Firefox has long had the ability to block all third-party cookies, but this is a crude solution, and many sites will break if all third-party cookies are prohibited. The new EPT option works as a more


Original URL: https://arstechnica.com/?p=1398617  

Original article

Recommender systems, Part 1: Introduction to approaches and algorithms

Most large-scale commercial and social websites recommend options, such
as products or people to connect with, to users. Recommendation engines sort
through massive amounts of data to identify potential user preferences. This
article, the first in a two-part series, explains the ideas behind
recommendation systems and introduces you to the algorithms that power them.
In Part 2, learn about some open source recommendation engines you can put to
work.


Original URL: http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/opensource/library/os-recommender1/index.html?ca=drs-  

Original article

Recommender systems, Part 2: Introducing open source engines

Part 1 of this series introduces the basic approaches and algorithms for
the construction of recommendation engines. This concluding installment
explores some open source solutions for building recommendation systems and
demonstrates the use of two of them. The author also shows how to develop a
simple clustering application in Ruby and apply it to sample data.


Original URL: http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/opensource/library/os-recommender2/index.html?ca=drs-  

Original article

Make your websites smarter with Schema.org, Part 4: Structured data tools

Using Schema.org to describe the content on your webpages enables search
engines and machines to more easily find and index your pages. There are a
number of tools that you can use to implement structured data on your pages.
In the final part of this series, we’ll look at examples of tools that help
you add structured data to plain HTML, validate the structured data on your
page, and parse the structured data from a page.


Original URL: http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/opensource/library/wa-schemaorg4/index.html?ca=drs-  

Original article

Make your websites smarter with Schema.org, Part 3: Understand and use the Schema.org vocabularies

When you use Schema.org vocabularies and metadata to
describe your content, it makes the content more useful and findable to
search engines. In part 3 of this series, I introduce you to the vocabularies
used in Schema.org and give you the tools to use them yourself.


Original URL: http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/opensource/library/wa-schemaorg3/index.html?ca=drs-  

Original article

The busy JavaScript developer’s guide to LoopBack: Hello, World!

LoopBack is one of many open source Node.js frameworks that have
recently rebooted the possibilities for server-side JavaScript development.
Set up LoopBack in your development environment, then write your first
LoopBack API using the command line and IBM API Connect, an API lifecycle
management platform.


Original URL: http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/opensource/library/wa-get-started-with-loopback-neward-1/index.html?ca=drs-  

Original article

TeleRead.org: A return to our roots

TeleRead.com, the web’s oldest site devoted to general-interest news and views on ebooks and related matters, has just moved back to TeleRead.org.
We hope you’ve rejoined us here. The “we” means Editor Chris Meadows (photo), Associate Editor Paul StJohn Mackintosh, Senior Writer Joanna Cabot, Contributing Writer Susan Lulgjuraj, and me. A former poverty beat reporter in an Ohio steel town, I founded TeleRead two decades ago to advocate well-stocked national digital libraries for all, and today I’m publisher.
In keeping with the .org, we’ll stand up for the commonweal and write on topics dear to us and our long-time community members. We won’t worry so much about pleasing Google and other SEO-related dieties. Hosted at WordPress.com, the new site will cost a fraction of what the .com version did. So no need to chase after ads right now.
TeleRead.com will remain online briefly as a locked-up WordPress site, then as static HTML.
Links to


Original URL: https://teleread.org/2016/06/21/rejoin-us-at-teleread-org-if-you-havent-already/  

Original article

Rejoin us at TeleRead.org: The .com version is now just an archive

Cross-posted
TeleRead.com, the web’s oldest site devoted to general-interest news and views on ebooks and related matters, has just moved back to TeleRead.org.
Please rejoin all of us there if you haven’t already: Editor Chris Meadows (photo), Associate Editor Paul StJohn Mackintosh, Senior Writer Joanna Cabot, Contributing Writer Susan Lulgjuraj, and me. A former poverty beat reporter in an Ohio steel town, I founded TeleRead two decades ago to advocate well-stocked national digital libraries for all, and today I’m publisher.
In keeping with the .org, we’ll stand up for the commonweal and write on topics dear to us and our long-time community members. We won’t worry so much about pleasing Google and other SEO-related dieties. Hosted at WordPress.com, the new site will cost a fraction of what the .com version did. So no need to chase after ads right now.
TeleRead.com will remain online briefly as a locked-up WordPress site, then as static HTML.
Links


Original URL: http://teleread.com/rejoin-us-teleread-org-havent-already/  

Original article

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