Learn the workings of Git, not just the commands

Git is a commonly used decentralized source code repository. It was created by the Linux creator Linus Torvalds for the management of the Linux kernel source code. Whole services like GitHub are based around it. So, if you want to program in the Linux world or use IBM’s DevOps Services with Git, it helps to have a good understanding of Git.
When I started working with Git I had some experience with Concurrent Versions System (CVS) and Apache Subversion (SVN), so I tried to understand it in terms of those classic source code repository systems. That way of thinking only got me a limited understanding of Git’s capabilities. Since then I have grown to understand Git much better, so this article is a kind of “note to self” text to remind myself how Git works and explain it to those who are new to it. I assume you know your way


Original URL: https://developer.ibm.com/tutorials/d-learn-workings-git/

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Version 2 of Google’s Flutter toolkit adds support for desktop and web apps

At an online event, Google today announced Flutter 2, the newest version of its open-source UI toolkit for building portable apps. While Flutter started out with a focus on mobile when it first launched two years ago, it spread its wings in recent years and with version 2, Flutter now supports web and desktop apps out of the box. With that, Flutter users can now use the same codebase to build apps for iOS, Android, Windows, MacOS, Linux and the web.
“The big thing that justifies the major version number shift is, of course, the availability of web and desktop support,” Flutter product lead Tim Sneath told me. “And that’s just a fairly profound pivot. It’s rare for products that you suddenly have all these additional endpoints.”
Image Credits: Google
He noted that because of Flutter’s open-source nature, web and desktop support had been “cooking in the open” for a while, so the


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Techcrunch/~3/7ED2BOERTSU/

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Monitor your website using JMeter

Introduction
When you hear the term “watchdog,” what does that conjure up in your mind? Something meant to guard, protect, or notify? Something that barks, snarls, or yells? Something with alarms, sirens, or blow horns? Depending on the context, your mind’s eye image may be spot on with those descriptions, but in this case, let’s get a bit more technical with a different kind of watchdog: JMeter.
In this tutorial, we introduce you to Apache JMeter, “a 100% pure Java application designed to load test functional behavior and measure performance.” Learn how to easily configure JMeter to monitor an application for various events so that you can identity problems quickly and fix them before they affect your end users.
Keeping web sites readily available and healthy is a challenge. Using the DevOps practice of continuous integration begs the complimentary use of test automation to ensure code deliverable quality. Using JMeter in the testing


Original URL: https://developer.ibm.com/tutorials/monitor-your-website-using-jmeter/

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Unlock local storage for mobile Web applications with HTML 5

HTML5 is a popular technology for very good reasons. It brought desktop application-like capabilities to the web browser, not just on the desktop, but also on mobile devices. In this five-part series, you will learn about popular HTML5 features. In each part, you will also get to experiment with code that showcases these features to illustrate how they work on both desktop and mobile browsers.
Prerequisites
In this tutorial, you will develop a web application to showcase the Local Storage API. The code used in this tutorial covers core web technologies like HTML, CSS (Cascading Style Sheets) and JavaScript. To test the application on desktop and mobile devices, it is recommended that you use the latest web browser versions.
Local storage 101
As websites became more dynamic and data driven, the need to store data on the client side increased. In many scenarios, web applications need to manage their own state and data, whether


Original URL: https://developer.ibm.com/tutorials/x-html5mobile2/

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Combine HTML5, geolocation APIs, and web services to create mobile mashups

HTML5 is a popular technology for valid reasons. It brought desktop application-like capabilities to the web browser — not just on the desktop but also on mobile devices. In this five-part series, you will learn about popular HTML5 features. In each part, you will also get to experiment with code that showcases these features to illustrate how they work on both desktop and mobile browsers.
Prerequisites
In this tutorial, you will develop a web application to showcase the geolocation API. The code uses core web technologies like HTML, Cascading Style Sheets (CSS), and JavaScript. To test the sample application on both desktop and mobile, we recommend using the latest web browser versions.
The basics: Getting a fix
The geolocation API provides a standardized interface for users to share their location with trusted websites. It allows a website to retrieve geographical location information of a user, like their latitude and longitude. This information can be


Original URL: https://developer.ibm.com/tutorials/x-html5mobile1/

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Create an Nginx reverse proxy across multiple backend servers

So you’ve got an application running in IBM Cloud. It’s made up of two components — each a Docker container, each listening on a given port and IP address. These components might be a backend that talks to a database, and a frontend that serves a website and talks to the backend. They could run on the same virtual server, or you might want to split them across different instances.
Either way, you may want these two components to appear as though they’re coming from the same endpoint, and have something route the traffic for you in a clever way. For example, you could route traffic calling any /api/ endpoint to the backend component, and any other traffic to the frontend component. It’s easy to do this using a reverse proxy like Nginx, and this tutorial shows you how.

Even easier, you’ll run it in IBM Cloud as a Cloud Foundry application.


Original URL: https://developer.ibm.com/tutorials/develop-a-website-with-different-frontend-and-api-backend-endpoints/

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