Trump Will Lose His Twitter ‘Public Interest’ Protections In January

Long-time Slashdot reader AmiMoJo shares the Verge’s report that U.S. President Donald Trump “will lose Twitter privileges he enjoys as a world leader when President-Elect Joe Biden takes office on January 20th, 2021.”

Twitter confirmed that Trump’s @realDonaldTrump account will be subject to the same rules as any other user — including bans on inciting violence and posting false information about voting or the coronavirus pandemic.

Twitter applies special policies to world leaders and some other officials, leaving rule-breaking content online if there’s “a clear public interest value to keeping the tweet on the service.” The public interest policy was formalized in 2019, codifying a rule that had been informally enforced for some time… “This policy framework applies to current world leaders and candidates for office, and not private citizens when they no longer hold these positions,” a Twitter spokesperson confirms to The Verge.

These changes will cover Trump’s personal account.


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/r7jP7_oacOs/trump-will-lose-his-twitter-public-interest-protections-in-january

Original article

Proctoring Software Company Used DMCA To Take Down a Student’s Critical Tweets

A series of tweets by one Miami University student that were critical of a proctoring software company have been hidden by Twitter after the company filed a copyright takedown notice. TechCrunch reports: Erik Johnson, a student who works as a security researcher on the side, posted a lengthy tweet thread in early September about Proctorio, an Arizona-based software company that several U.S. schools — including his own — use to monitor students who are taking their exams remotely. But six weeks later, Johnson received an email from Twitter saying three of those tweets had been removed from his account in response to a request by Proctorio filed under the Digital Millennium Copyright Act.

Proctorio, based in Scottsdale, Arizona, says its proctoring software is privacy friendly. Students are required to install its Chrome extension before taking a test, which the company says students can remove once they’re done. Unlike desktop software,


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/eAnEicUPfWA/proctoring-software-company-used-dmca-to-take-down-a-students-critical-tweets

Original article

WordPress can now turn blog posts into tweetstorms automatically

Earlier this year, WordPress.com introduced an easier way to post your Twitter threads, also known as tweetstorms, to your blog with the introduction of the “unroll” option for Twitter embeds. Today, the company is addressing the flip side of tweetstorm publication — it’s making it possible to turn your existing WordPress blog post into a tweetstorm with just a couple of clicks.
The new feature will allow you to tweet out every word of your post, as well as the accompanying images and videos, the company says. These will be automatically inserted into the thread where they belong alongside your text.
To use the tweetstorm feature, a WordPress user will first click on the Jetpack icon on the top right of the page, then connect their Twitter account to their WordPress site, if that hadn’t been done already.
Image Credits: WordPress.com
 
The option also supports multiple Twitter accounts, if you want to post your


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Techcrunch/~3/ek5qXK52iUU/

Original article

Twitter Warns of Possible API Keys Leak

Twitter is notifying developers today about a possible security incident that may have impacted their accounts. From a report: The incident was caused by incorrect instructions that the developer.twitter.com website sent to users’ browsers. The developer.twitter.com website is the portal where developers manage their Twitter apps and attached API keys, but also the access token and secret key for their Twitter account. In an email sent to developers today, Twitter said that its developer.twitter.com website told browsers to create and store copies of the API keys, account access token, and account secret inside their cache, a section of the browser where data is saved to speed up the process of loading the page when the user accessed the same site again. This might not be a problem for developers using their own browsers, but Twitter is warning developers who may have used public or shared computers to access the developer.twitter.com


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/Y-HGFF4HpWk/twitter-warns-of-possible-api-keys-leak

Original article

Amazon launches new Alexa developer tools

Amazon today announced a slew of new features for developers who want to write Alexa skills. In total, the team released 31 new features at its Alexa Live event. Unsurprisingly, some of these are relatively minor but a few significantly change the Alexa experience for the over 700,000 developers who have built skills for the platform so far.
“This year, given all our momentum, we really wanted to pay attention to what developers truly required to take us to the next level of what engaging [with Alexa] really means,” Nedim Fresko, the company’s VP of Alexa Devices & Developer Technologies, told me.
Maybe it’s no surprise then that one of the highlights of this release is the beta launch of Alexa Conversations, which the company first demonstrated at its re:Mars summit last year. The overall idea here is, as the name implies, to make it easier for users to have a natural


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Techcrunch/~3/374y-Nm8960/

Original article

Many New Details Emerge About Twitter’s Breach

The New York Times claims to have traced the origins of a Twitter security breach to “a teasing message between two hackers late Tuesday on the online messaging platform Discord.” [The Times’ article was also republished here by the Bangkok Post.]

“yoo bro,” wrote a user named “Kirk,” according to a screenshot of the conversation shared with The New York Times. “i work at twitter / don’t show this to anyone / seriously.” He then demonstrated that he could take control of valuable Twitter accounts — the sort of thing that would require insider access to the company’s computer network. The hacker who received the message, using the screen name “lol,” decided over the next 24 hours that Kirk did not actually work for Twitter because he was too willing to damage the company. But Kirk did have access to Twitter’s most sensitive tools, which allowed him to take control of


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/AfsQElJCSm4/many-new-details-emerge-about-twitters-breach

Original article

A popular WordPress plugin leaked access tokens capable of hijacking Twitter accounts

A popular WordPress plugin, installed on thousands of websites to help users share content on social media sites, left linked Twitter accounts exposed to compromise.
The plugin, Social Network Tabs, was storing so-called account access tokens in the source code of the WordPress website. Anyone who viewed the source code could see the linked Twitter handle and the access tokens. These access tokens keep you logged in to the website on your phone and your computer without having to re-type your password every time or entering your two-factor authentication code.
But if stolen, most sites can’t differentiate between a token used by the account owner, or a hacker who stole the token.
Baptiste Robert, a French security researcher who goes by the online handle Elliot Alderson, found the vulnerability and shared details with TechCrunch. He later tweeted details of the bug on Thursday.
In order to test the bug, Robert found 539 websites using


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Techcrunch/~3/LR44OlbFhu8/

Original article

Proudly powered by WordPress | Theme: Baskerville 2 by Anders Noren.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: