Faster Audio Decoding and Encoding Coming To Ogg and FLAC

FLAC and Ogg now have faster audio encoding and decoding capabilities thanks to recent code improvements. An anonymous reader writes: Robert Kausch of the fre:ac audio converter project informed news outlet Phoronix about recent changes he has made to FLAC and Ogg for bolstering faster performance. Kausch says he updated the CRC checks within FLAC and Ogg to a faster algorithm and those patches have now been accepted upstream. The Ogg and FLAC updates were merged this week for using the optimized CRC algorithm. As a result of this, encoding and decoding FLAC is now 5 percent faster, while encoding and decoding Ogg FLAC is 10 percent and 15 percent faster, respectively. Opus sees about one percent faster decoding, while Vorbis does decoding at two percent faster pace.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/8wRu9ECX3eU/faster-audio-decoding-and-encoding-coming-to-ogg-and-flac

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Author Brian Dear talks about the amazing PLATO computing system

 Before Xerox Parc there was PLATO. This amazing computing system came to life in 1960 and by the 1970s was running a number of graphical terminals well before the rise of Xerox PARC and the Alto. This wild little system used some unique hardware and software to create true early educational computing projects and author Brian Dear has written an amazing book on the project. Called Friendly… Read More


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Techcrunch/~3/Xa31SFQJJ7A/

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I Was a Messenger Spoof Victim

 

A few days ago I returned to my office after a meeting to find emails and voicemails telling me that someone was sending facebook messenger messages pretending they were from me. The first message sent was an innocuous “Hello, how are you doing?” But if the recipient engaged it quickly turned into how I got a $300,000 government grant to pay off my bills, and tried to convince the recipient to send an email to “the agent in charge” to see if they were eligible. I suspect if followed through it would either ask for payment of a loan application fee, or ask for credit card or other personal details.
Fortunately, it didn’t take long for my followers to realize it was a scam and not me.
This government grant scam is a known scam approach. Typically one of two things has happened. Either the malfeasant has hacked into my facebook account,


Original URL: http://www.slaw.ca/2017/12/06/i-was-a-messenger-spoof-victim/

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AWS launches translation services

 Taking to yet another front the battle with Google, Apple and Microsoft for dominance in speech recognition and natural language processing, Amazon announced a new translation service as part of its AWS extravaganza.
As part of Amazon Web Services, Translate will provide text translations for supported languages (Google and Microsoft have been offering these services for years).
Amazon is… Read More


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Techcrunch/~3/yP72prLcSME/

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You Don’t Have To Buy A New Car To Use Android Auto Now And It’s Great

If you’re like me and you need to use Google Maps to navigate everywhere, including the Jimmy John’s that’s only 1.3 miles away and, like me, you don’t drive a car compatible with Android Auto, you should go ahead and download it right now anyway. That’s because it’s now available to use on your phone, and it’s flipping fantastic.Read more…


Original URL: http://feeds.gawker.com/~r/lifehacker/full/~3/h58Rm-RI20E/you-dont-have-to-buy-a-new-car-to-use-android-auto-now-1788654704

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Latest Raspbian upgrade turbocharges Raspberry experience

TeleRead stalwarts may remember that I adopted a Raspberry Pi 2 Model B as a test bed to try out this tiny but popular ultra-cheap one-card compact computing solution. Initially, I wasn’t impressed, although later I had some better experiences with the hardware. My initial disappointments were based chiefly on the shortcomings of Raspberry’s preferred Raspbian OS. This version of Debian, as I reported previously, offered “painfully slow load times” when using Google Docs and when executing most browser-based tasks. That basically led me to abandon the Raspberry.
Until now. Because Raspberry has whipped up a new desktop environment for Raspbian and its associated hardware called PIXEL, “which now officially stands for ‘Pi Improved Xwindows Environment, Lightweight’.” And improved it certainly is. Not only does the new OS front end look far slicker than older versions, with a fully overhauled Windows-style interface and drop-down menus, it’s also far faster. It’s bigger


Original URL: https://teleread.org/2016/10/20/latest-raspbian-upgrade-turbocharges-raspberry-experience/

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Teaching Technology in the Academy – Dean’s Roundtable Part 2 – The ABA Annual Meeting (West Coast) edition

[NOTE: Please welcome guest blogger, Michael J. Robak, Associate Director/Director of Information Technologies, Leon E. Bloch Law Library, University of Missouri – Kansas City. -GL]
The movement to establish a true Technology instruction track and andragogy (meaning Susskind, Kowalski, et. al.) in the legal academy is gaining real momentum.  As readers may recall, on March 16, 2016 the ABA TECHSHOW provided an opportunity for an Academic specific event tied to TECHSHOW which 3 Geeks generously allowed me to advertise.  This first ever Dean’s Roundtable, held at IIT Chicago Kent College of Law (which was enthusiastically supported and hosted by Professor Ron Staudt,), was incredibly successful and helped set the stage for creating an Academic track at the 2017 ABA TECHSHOW.
The event was so successful that the 2016 ABA TECHSHOW Chair, Steve Best, thought a second edition of the Dean’s Roundtable would provide an even greater opportunity for dialogue if it could


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/geeklawblog/~3/ChUziy8TWmc/teaching-technology-in-academy-deans.html

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Library Fends Off DDoS Attack

This is a guest post by Bernard A. Barton Jr., chief information officer of the Library of Congress.
On Sunday morning, July 17, the Library became the target of a distributed denial of service (DDoS) network attack that resulted in the disruption of Library services and websites, including Congress.gov, the U.S. Copyright Office, the BARD service from the National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped, our many databases, and both incoming and outgoing email.
I’m pleased to report that our team of Library IT professionals and contract partners have returned our networked services to normal functionality. We did this while maintaining the security of the Library’s network.
This was a massive and sophisticated DNS assault, employing multiple forms of attack, adapting and changing on the fly. We’ve turned over key evidence to the appropriate authorities who will investigate and hopefully bring the instigators of this assault to justice.
We’re satisfied that we’ve


Original URL: http://blogs.loc.gov/loc/2016/07/library-fends-off-ddos-attack/

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