New for AWS Lambda – Use Any Programming Language and Share Common Components

I remember the excitement when AWS Lambda was announced in 2014! Four years on, customers are using Lambda functions for many different use cases. For example, iRobot is using AWS Lambda to provide compute services for their Roomba robotic vacuum cleaners, Fannie Mae to run Monte Carlo simulations for millions of mortgages, Bustle to serve billions of requests for their digital content.
Today, we are introducing two new features that are going to make serverless development even easier:
Lambda Layers, a way to centrally manage code and data that is shared across multiple functions.
Lambda Runtime API, a simple interface to use any programming language, or a specific language version, for developing your functions.
These two features can be used together: runtimes can be shared as layers so that developers can pick them up and use their favorite programming language when authoring Lambda functions.
Let’s see how they work more in detail.
Lambda Layers
When building serverless applications, it


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AWS Serverless Application Model (SAM) Command Line Interface – Build, Test, and Debug Serverless Apps Locally

Decades ago, I wrote page after page of code in 6502 assembly language. After assembling and linking the code, I would load it into memory, set breakpoints at strategic locations, and step through to make sure that everything worked as intended. These days, I no longer have the opportunity to write or debug any non-trivial code, so I was a bit apprehensive when it came time to write this blog post (truth be told, I have been procrastinating for several weeks).
SAM CLI I want to tell you about the new Serverless Application Model (SAM) Command Line Interface, and to gain some confidence in my ability to build something using AWS Lambda as I do so! Let’s review some terms to get started:
AWS SAM, short for Serverless Application Model, is an open source framework you can use to build serverless applications on AWS. It provides a shorthand syntax you


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Aurora Serverless MySQL Generally Available

You may have heard of Amazon Aurora, a custom built MySQL and PostgreSQL compatible database born and built in the cloud. You may have also heard of serverless, which allows you to build and run applications and services without thinking about instances. These are two pieces of the growing AWS technology story that we’re really excited to be working on. Last year, at AWS re:Invent we announced a preview of a new capability for Aurora called Aurora Serverless. Today, I’m pleased to announce that Aurora Serverless for Aurora MySQL is generally available. Aurora Serverless is on-demand, auto-scaling, serverless Aurora. You don’t have to think about instances or scaling and you pay only for what you use.

This paradigm is great for applications with unpredictable load or infrequent demand. In production, you can save on costs by adjusting to scale based on actual load in extremely granular increments – matching


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Now Available – AWS Serverless Application Repository

Last year I suggested that you Get Ready for the AWS Serverless Application Repository and gave you a sneak peek. The Repository is designed to make it as easy as possible for you to discover, configure, and deploy serverless applications and components on AWS. It is also an ideal venue for AWS partners, enterprise customers, and independent developers to share their serverless creations.
Now Available After a well-received public preview, the AWS Serverless Application Repository is now generally available and you can start using it today!
As a consumer, you will be able to tap in to a thriving ecosystem of serverless applications and components that will be a perfect complement to your machine learning, image processing, IoT, and general-purpose work. You can configure and consume them as-is, or you can take them apart, add features, and submit pull requests to the author.
As a publisher, you can publish your


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New – AWS SAM Local (Beta) – Build and Test Serverless Applications Locally

Today we’re releasing a beta of a new tool, SAM Local, that makes it easy to build and test your serverless applications locally. In this post we’ll use SAM local to build, debug, and deploy a quick application that allows us to vote on tabs or spaces by curling an endpoint. AWS introduced Serverless Application Model (SAM) last year to make it easier for developers to deploy serverless applications. If you’re not already familiar with SAM my colleague Orr wrote a great post on how to use SAM that you can read in about 5 minutes. At it’s core, SAM is a powerful open source specification built on AWS CloudFormation that makes it easy to keep your serverless infrastructure as code – and they have the cutest mascot.

SAM Local takes all the good parts of SAM and brings them to your local machine.
It lets you develop and


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