GitHub Launches Bot-Powered Learning Lab for New Developers

An anonymous reader quotes VentureBeat:
GitHub is launching a new bot-powered learning lab to help budding developers get up to speed on all things GitHub… The GitHub Learning Lab, which officially launched Thursday, builds on GitHub’s prior history of training people, except this time GitHub is using bots to expedite the learning process. There is no videoconferencing or webcasts here. “After training thousands of people to use Git and GitHub, the GitHub Training Team has established a tried-and-true method for helping new developers retain more information and ramp up quickly as they begin their software journeys,” the company said in a blog post. “And now, we’re making those experiences accessible to developers everywhere with GitHub Learning Lab.”
The bot helps users work through issues in a repository environment, passing comment on any work that you do while checking over pull requests — notifications of changes you’ve made — in a similar


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/IZFFeC88aQk/github-launches-bot-powered-learning-lab-for-new-developers

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New Alexa Blueprints Let Users Make Custom Skills Without Knowing Any Code

An anonymous reader quotes a report from Ars Technica: Amazon just released a new way for Alexa users to customize their experience with the virtual assistant. New Alexa Skill Blueprints allow you to create your own personalized Alexa skills, even if you don’t know how to code. These “blueprints” act as templates for making questions, responses, trivia games, narrative stories, and other skills with customizable answers unique to each user. Amazon already has a number of resources for developers to make the new skills they want, but until now, users have had to work within the confines of pre-made Alexa skills. Currently, more than 20 templates are available on the new Alexa Skill Blueprints website, all ready for Alexa users to personalize with their own content. Any blueprint-made skills you make will show up on the “Skills You’ve Made” section of the blueprints website. While these skills will exist for


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/GSYXOGuxgOM/new-alexa-blueprints-let-users-make-custom-skills-without-knowing-any-code

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GitHub Drops Support for Weak Cryptographies, Adds Emojis for Labels

An anonymous reader writes:
GitHub has quietly made a few changes this month. Labels for issues and pull requests will now also support emojis and on-hover descriptions. And they’re also deprecating the anonymous creation of “gist” code snippets on March 19th, since “as the only way to create anonymous content on GitHub, they also see a large volume of spam.” Current anonymous gists will remain accessible. But the biggest change involves permanently removing support for three weak cryptographic standards, both on github.com and api.github.com.

The three weak cryptography standards that are no longer supported are:

TLSv1/TLSv1.1. “This applies to all HTTPS connections, including web, API, and Git connections to https://github.com and https://api.github.com.”

diffie-hellman-group1-sha1. “This applies to all SSH connections to github.com.”

diffie-hellman-group14-sha1. “This applies to all SSH connections to github.com.”

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Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/s5a0oYeNhHw/github-drops-support-for-weak-cryptographies-adds-emojis-for-labels

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GitHub Commits Reveal The Top ‘Weekend Programming’ Languages

An anonymous reader writes:
Google “developer advocate” Felipe Hoffa has determined the top “weekend programming languages,” those which see the biggest spike in commit activity on the weekends. “Clearly 2016 was a year dedicated to play with functional languages, up and coming paradigms, and scripting 3d worlds,” he writes, revealing that the top weekend programming languages are:
Rust, Glsl, D, Haskell, Common Lisp, Kicad, Emacs Lisp, Lua, Scheme, Julia, Elm, Eagle, Racket, Dart, Nsis, Clojure, Kotlin, Elixir, F#, Ocaml

Earlier this week another data scientist calculated ended up with an entirely different list by counting the frequency of each language’s tag in StackOverflow questions. But Hoffa’s analysis was performed using Google’s BigQuery web service, and he’s also compiled a list of 2016’s least popular weekend languages — the ones people seem to prefer using at the office rather than in their own free time.
Nginx, Matlab, Processing, Vue, Fortran, Visual Basic,


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/5-PH587uJcY/github-commits-reveal-the-top-weekend-programming-languages

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Dev-Books Is a Massive Collection of the Most Recommended Coding and Programming Books

Stack Overflow is filled with thousands of questions and answers, and many of those are book recommendations from programmers with many different levels of skill. Dev-Books collects together the most recommended books.Read more…


Original URL: http://feeds.gawker.com/~r/lifehacker/full/~3/YzO32BtrQTI/dev-books-is-a-massive-collection-of-the-most-recommend-1792134129

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The $5 Onion Omega2 Gives Raspberry Pi a Run For Its Money

An anonymous reader writes from a report via The Daily Dot: Onion’s Omega2 computer may give the Raspberry Pi a run for its money if the success of the Kickstarter campaign is any indication. The Daily Dot reports: “With an initial goal of just $15,000, over 11,560 backers have pledged the company $446,792 in hopes of getting their hands on this little wonder board. So why are thousands of people losing their minds? Simple; the Omega2 packs a ton of power into a $5 package. Billed as the world’s smallest Linux server, complete with built-in Wi-Fi, the Omega2 is perfect for building simple computers or the web connected project of your dreams. The tiny machine is roughly the size of a cherry, before expansions, and runs a full Linux operating system. For $5 you get a 580MHz CPU, 64MB memory, 16MB storage, built-in Wi-Fi and a USB 2.0 port. A


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/w2DmRTUdnnQ/the-5-onion-omega2-gives-raspberry-pi-a-run-for-its-money

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Ruby On Rails 5.0 Released

steveb3210 writes: Today, Ruby On Rails released version 5.0.0 of the platform. Major new features include ActionCable which brings support for WebSockets and a slimmed-down API-only mode From the official blog post:After six months of polish, four betas, and two release candidates, Rails 5.0 is finally done! It’s taken hundreds of contributors and thousands of commits to get here, but what a destination: Rails 5.0 is without a doubt the best, most complete version of Rails yet. It’s incredible that this community is still going so strong after so long. Thanks to everyone who helped get us here. […] Note: As per our maintenance policy, the release of Rails 5.0 will mean that bug fixes will only apply to 5.0.x, regular security issues to 5.0.x and 4.2.x, and severe security issues also to 5.0.x and 4.2.x (but when 5.1 drops, to 5.1.x, 5.0.x, and 4.2.x). This means 4.1.x and below


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/ygR6iOH55DE/ruby-on-rails-50-released

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jQuery 3.0 Stops Supporting Internet Explorer Workarounds

An anonymous reader writes: Thursday’s release of jQuery 3.0 is “the first version that features absolutely no workarounds for old Internet Explorer browsers,” reports Softpedia. “If customers are still asking you to work with IE6, IE7, and IE8, then you should stick with jQuery 1.0 for the foreseeable future.” The jQuery blog explains that over 18 months of development, “We set out to create a slimmer, faster version of jQuery (with backwards compatibility in mind)… It is a continuation of the 2.x branch, but with a few breaking changes that we felt were long overdue.” Besides jQuery’s free, open source JavaScript library, they also released a “slim” version that excludes ajax and effects modules (as well as deprecated code), and a new version of the jQuery Migrate plugin.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/8zT5-CZda1g/jquery-30-stops-supporting-internet-explorer-workarounds

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Node.js Now Runs COBOL and FORTRAN

Last summer a developer created a plugin which made it possible to run snippets of COBOL code embedded in JavaScript using the Node.js interpreter. Now Slashdot reader techfilz writes: Romanian developer Bizau Ionica has engineered a software bridge called node.cobol which can execute Node.js scripts from within COBOL programs.
The link shows COBOL code executing a Node.js script that launches a Web server and creates ASCII art from a JPEG image — in this case, Admiral Grace Hopper, who helped create COBOL in 1959. And Ars Technica points out the same developer has also built a Node.js bridge for FORTRAN.


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Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/0hDiOIOvZ4U/nodejs-now-runs-cobol-and-fortran

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