Launching the RECAP API

List of interested parties to contact:
Sai – i@s.ai
Gavin Sheridan – gavin@vizlegal.com and Jose Alberto ja@vizlegal.com
David Donet Sr – david@donetsr.com
Ian Francis – ianjfrancis55@gmail.com
Kyle and ALex
Michael Shurtleff – ms@salemlawllc.com
Mark Deming – bittersweetholdingcompany@gmail.com
Reed Jessen – reed@ipstreet.com (interested in bi-directional API in May/June for use with Unified Patents)
Surya Mattu – Guy I met at the Knight Foundation thing, now works for Gizmodo. Is building a PACER awareness bot for their slack channel. Only interested in the API once it can scrape new stuff. surya@suryamattu.com
Matt Channon – jrqqqq@gmail.com. building some kind of iOS tool called Habeas.
David Gribbin (djgribbin11@gmail.com) – kind of a random person that emailed. Gathering more info…
Nikolaos Tsoukas – Interested I guess from research perspective. See email.
David Kellum – Sqoop.com. Has some platform for helping journalists. Interested in RECAP Archive and Clearinghouse, but may not want to pay…not clear. Currently is scraping PACER RSS feeds.
Nirav Patel (nirav@datazapp.com) – Wants to use data to market to bankrupt people. Not ideal, but, hm.
Jonathan Edward Germann (jgermann@gsu.edu) – Wants PACER


Original URL: https://free.law/2018/01/01/launching-the-recap-api/

Original article

Uploading PACER Dockets and Oral Argument Recordings to the Internet Archive

Highlights
We have begun uploading six million PACER dockets to the Internet Archive. Docket uploads will be completed quarterly going forward.

Our collection of oral argument recordings now supports all circuit courts and the Supreme Court. Previously, due to inaccesibility, it lacked the 10th and 11th Circuits.

We have uploaded more than 40 thousand oral argument recordings consisting of over one thousand days of audio to the Internet Archive. New oral argument recordings will be uploaded nightly.

At Free Law Project, we collect a lot of legal information. In our RECAP initiative, we collect (or are donated) around one hundred thousand items from PACER every day. Separately, in our collection of oral argument recordings, we have gathered more than 1.4 million minutes of legal recordings — more than anywhere else on the web. All of this content comes from a variety of sources, and we merge it all together to make a searchable collection


Original URL: https://free.law/2018/09/11/uploading-pacer-dockets-and-oral-argument-recordings-to-the-internet-archive/

Original article

Announcing PACER Docket Alerts for Journalists, Lawyers, Researchers, and the Public

Make Alerts Now

Today we are thrilled to announce the general availability of PACER Docket Alerts on CourtListener.com. Once enabled, a docket alert will send you an email whenever there is a new filing in a case in PACER. We started CourtListener in 2010 as a circuit court monitoring tool, and we could not be more excited to continue expanding on those roots with this powerful new tool.
The best way to get started with Docket Alerts is to just make one. Try loading a popular case like U.S. v. Manafort or The District of Columbia v. Trump. Once the case is open, just press the “Get Alerts” button near the top. Then, just wait for your first alert.

We believe PACER Docket Alerts will be a valuable resource to journalists, researchers, lawyers, and the public as they grapple with staying up to date with the latest PACER filings.
Our goal with docket alerts is to


Original URL: https://free.law/2018/08/21/announcing-pacer-docket-alerts-for-journalists-lawyers-researchers-and-the-public/

Original article

More Details on the PACER Vulnerability We Shared with the Administrative Office of the Courts

PACER/ECF is a system of 204 websites that is run by the Administrative Office of the Courts (AO) for the management of federal court documents. The main function of PACER/ECF is for lawyers and the public to upload and download court documents such as briefs, memos, orders, and opinions.
In February we reported that we disclosed a major vulnerability in PACER/ECF to the AO. The proof of concept and disclosure/resolution timeline are available here.
We are pleased to share that this issue is now properly addressed, and that we are now able to report more details about it. Throughout the process of researching, disclosing, and resolving this vulnerability, the AO has been prompt and professional, something that we greatly appreciate given the considerable constraints and complexities they are facing. However, despite their skill in dealing with this issue, after discovering it we have lingering concerns about the security of PACER/ECF on


Original URL: https://free.law/2017/08/09/more-details-on-the-pacer-vulnerability-we-shared-with-the-administrative-office-of-the-courts/

Original article

Free Law Project has Notified the Administrative Office of the Courts about a Major Security Vulnerability in the PACER/ECF System

Recently, as part of our routine business practices, we discovered what we believe is a major vulnerability in the PACER system of websites that we believe affects both the electronic case filing and public access portals.
At this time, as part of a responsible disclosure process, we have notified the appropriate parties at The Administrative Office of the Courts, the agency that runs PACER. According to industry norms, we have given them a broad 90 day window to resolve the vulnerability.
After the 90 days are up or the issue is resolved, we plan to publish the details of what we discovered, the ramifications of the discovery, and the solution that they have put in place, if any.
Further questions about the vulnerability can be directed to our contact form where you can find our GPG key, if needed.


Original URL: https://free.law/2017/02/20/free-law-project-has-notified-the-administrative-office-of-the-courts-about-a-major-security-vulnerability-in-the-pacerecf-system/

Original article

What is a “Page” of PACER Content

As most readers of this blog know, PACER is a system run by the Administrative Office of the Courts (AO) that hosts over a billion documents from the Federal District and Circuit courts. The system was created in the nineties and was set up with a paywall so that you pay for every “page” of data that you receive. The idea of the fees, as established by the E-Government Act, is that the AO could use them to recoup the cost of running the PACER, but the pricing of the content has always been a bit odd. In my last post I talked about how these fees result in an outrageous cost for PACER data. In this post, I do a deep dive into the core unit of PACER’s pricing and attempt to answer the question, what is a “page” of PACER data?
The size of PACER’s fees has varied over


Original URL: https://free.law/2016/11/03/what-is-a-page-of-pacer-content/

Original article

The Cost of PACER Data? Around One Billion Dollars.

Recently, we started a new project to analyze a few million PACER documents that we acquired through the RECAP Project. As we began working with the data, one thing we did was count how many pages every document had so that we could calculate the average length of a PDF in PACER. Fairly quickly we learned that based on our sample, the average length of a PACER document is 9.1 pages.1
Based on a sample of about 2M PDFs, the average length of a PACER document is 9.1 pages. The max (so far) is 4,417.— RECAP the Law (@RECAPtheLaw) September 2, 2016

This is a really interesting statistic. Another is that there are more than one billion documents in in PACER:

CM/ECF currently contains, in aggregate, more than one billion retrievable documents spread among the 13 courts of appeals, 94 district courts, 90 bankruptcy courts, and other specialized tribunals.

2014 Supreme Court Annual


Original URL: https://free.law/2016/10/10/the-cost-of-pacer-data-around-one-billion-dollars/

Original article

Extracting Text from Our Collection of PACER Documents

We’re getting ready to launch a brand new search engine for PACER content. When it launches, one of the big features it will have is full-text search for the millions of documents that people have submitted using our RECAP system. To our knowledge, this will be the first free system for searching PACER content in this way, allowing you to look up documents by any word they might contain.
The big problem with this goal? We have about a million PDFs that consist only of images. Some of these are actually quite beautiful:

A beautiful handwritten motion. It goes on like this for 46 pages.

But others are hideous:

An 84 page log from 1957. It’s come a long ways just to appear on this blog today.

But no matter how a document looks, we want to extract the text so that we can make it searchable. This is done using a system called Optical Character Recognition (OCR),


Original URL: https://free.law/2016/09/26/extracting-text-from-our-collection-of-pacer-documents/

Original article

Legalist is making it easier for lawyers to find state court records

 Imagine a lawyer with a client who lives in one county and works in another. Or even a lawyer who litigates in multiple states. Both common occurrences, but situations that make it very hard to keep track of legal documents. Essentially, it should be easy to keep track of court records from multiple counties and states – but it’s not. In fact, it’s pretty awful. Most are… Read More


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Techcrunch/~3/sjwGHcnh2gc/

Original article

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