Linux 5.4 Released

diegocg writes: Linux 5.4 has been released, featuring the new kernel lockdown mode, intended to strengthen the boundary between UID and the kernel; virtio-fs, a high-performance virtio driver which allows a virtualized guest to mount a directory that has been exported on the host; fs-verity, for detecting file tampering, like dm-verity, but works on files rather than block devices; dm-clone, which allows live cloning of dm targets; two new madvise() flags for improved app memory management on Android, support for new Intel/AMD GPUs, support for the exfat file system and removing the experimental status of the erofs file system; a new haltpoll cpuidle driver and governor that greatly improves performance for virtualized guests wanting to do guest-side polling in the idle loop; and blk-iocost, a new cgroup controller that attempts to calculate more accurately the cost of IO. As always, many other new drivers and improvements can be found in


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/yAUHoqhlsk8/linux-54-released

Original article

Fedora 31 Released

Fedora 31 has just rolled out the door. From a report: Is it an exciting release? No, not really. Sure, enthusiasts will find themselves thrilled withe inclusion of the GNOME 3.34 desktop environment (with Qt Wayland by default), Linux 5.3 kernel, and Mesa 9.2, but otherwise, it is fairly boring. You know what? That’s not a bad thing. In 2019, Fedora is simply a mature and stable operating system that only needs to follow an evolutionary path at this time — not revolutionary. It stands alone as the world’s best desktop Linux distribution. “Fedora 31 Workstation provides new tools and features for general users as well as developers with the inclusion of GNOME 3.34. GNOME 3.34 brings significant performance enhancements which will be especially noticeable on lower-powered hardware. Fedora 31 Workstation also expands the default uses of Wayland, including allowing Firefox to run natively on Wayland under GNOME instead of


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/VX85xMu5nWw/fedora-31-released

Original article

Ubuntu-Based Linux Mint 19.2 ‘Tina’ is Here with Cinnamon, MATE, and Xfce

The Linux Mint project today released the Linux Mint 19.2 “Tina”, which is now available for download as Cinnamon, MATE, and Xfce editions. From a report: If your computer is fairly modern, take my advice and opt for the excellent Cinnamon. MATE and Xfce are solid choices too, although they are more appropriate for computers with meager hardware. For new users, choosing amongst three interfaces can be confusing — thankfully, the Mint developers stopped using KDE almost two years ago. Linux Mint 19.2 “Tina” is based on the wildly popular Ubuntu operating system, but on 18.04 rather than the new 19.04. Why use an older version of Ubuntu as a base? Because 18.04 is an LTS or “Long Term Support” variant. While version 19.04 will be supported for less than a year, 18.04 is being supported for a mind-boggling 10 years! The Linux kernel is version 4.15 and not part


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/gCCUVEtnB0A/ubuntu-based-linux-mint-192-tina-is-here-with-cinnamon-mate-and-xfce

Original article

Linux 5.1 Released

diegocg writes: Linux 5.1 released has been released. The main feature in this release is io_uring, a high-performance interface for asynchronous I/O; there are also improvements in fanotify to provide a scalable way of watching changes on large file systems; it also adds a method to allow safe delivery of signals in presence of PID reuse; persistent memory can be used now as hot-plugabble RAM; Zstd compression levels have been made configurable in Btrfs; there is a new cpuidle governor that makes better power management decisions than the menu governor; all 32 bit architectures have added the necessary syscalls to deal with the y2038 problem; and live patching has added support for creating cumulative patches. There are many other features and new drivers in the changelog.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/BE6xtMJ55V4/linux-51-released

Original article

Linux 5.1 Continues The Years-Long Effort Preparing For Year 2038

Linux 5.1 continues the massive undertaking in preparing the kernel for the Year 2038 problem. Phoronix: The Linux kernel has been seeing “Y2038” work for years and the effort is far from over. Thomas Gleixner (a Linux kernel developer who serves as a member of the technical advisory board at The Linux Foundation) sent in the latest Y2038 work for the Linux 5.1 kernel, which after a lot of ground work in previous kernels has introduced the first set of syscalls that are Year 2038 safe.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/ZFUvnqa2QXQ/linux-51-continues-the-years-long-effort-preparing-for-year-2038

Original article

Linux 4.20 Released in Time for Christmas

Linus Torvalds has announced the general availability of v4.20 of the Linux kernel. In a post to the Linux Kernel Mailing List, Torvalds said that there was no point in delaying the release of the latest stable version of the kernel just because so many people are taking a break for the holiday season. From a report: He says that while there are no known issues with the release, the shortlog is a little longer than he would have liked. However “nothing screams ‘oh, that’s scary'”, he insists. The most notable features and changes in the new version includes: New hardware support! New hardware support includes bringing up the graphics for AMD Picasso and Raven 2 APUs, continued work on bringing up Vega 20, Intel has continued putting together its Icelake Gen 11 graphics support, there is support for the Hygon Dhyana CPUs out of China based upon AMD Zen,


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/5a2nRNd2EI4/linux-420-released-in-time-for-christmas

Original article

The Linux Kernel Is Now VLA-Free: A Win For Security, Less Overhead and Better For Clang

With the in-development Linux 4.20 kernel, it is now effectively VLA-free. From a report: The variable-length arrays (VLAs) that can be convenient and part of the C99 standard but can have unintended consequences. VLAs allow for array lengths to be determined at run-time rather than compile time. The Linux kernel has long relied upon VLAs in different parts of the kernel — including within structures — but going on for months now (and years if counting the kernel Clang’ing efforts) has been to remove the usage of variable-length arrays within the kernel. The problems with them are: 1. Using variable-length arrays can add some minor run-time overhead to the code due to needing to determine the size of the array at run-time. 2. VLAs within structures is not supported by the LLVM Clang compiler and thus an issue for those wanting to build the kernel outside of GCC, Clang only


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/Y0TiCl4855s/the-linux-kernel-is-now-vla-free-a-win-for-security-less-overhead-and-better-for-clang

Original article

OpenBSD 6.4 Released

The 45th version of the OpenBSD project has been released, bringing more hardware support (Radeon driver updates, Intel microcode integration, and more), a virtualization tool that supports the disk format qcow2, and a network interface where you can quickly join and switch between different Wi-Fi networks. Root.cz also notes that audio recording is now disabled by default. If you need to record audio, it can be enabled with the new sysctl variable. An anonymous Slashdot reader first shared the announcement. You can download it from any of the mirrors here.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/u-A4NHs2JV8/openbsd-64-released

Original article

The Linux Kernel Has Grown By 225,000 Lines of Code This Year, With Contributions From About 3,300 Developers

Here’s an analysis of the Linux kernel repository that attempts to find some fresh numbers on the current kernel development trends. He writes: The kernel repository is at 782,487 commits in total from around 19.009 different authors. The repository is made up of 61,725 files and from there around 25,584,633 lines — keep in mind there is also documentation, Kconfig build files, various helpers/utilities, etc. So far this year there has been 49,647 commits that added 2,229,836 lines of code while dropping 2,004,759 lines of code. Or a net gain of just 225,077 lines. Keep in mind there was the removal of some old CPU architectures and other code removed in kernels this year so while a lot of new functionality was added, thanks to some cleaning, the kernel didn’t bloat up as much as one might have otherwise expected. In 2017 there were 80,603 commits with 3,911,061 additions and


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/5_Kyj5nxu4c/the-linux-kernel-has-grown-by-225000-lines-of-code-this-year-with-contributions-from-about-3300-developers

Original article

Proudly powered by WordPress | Theme: Baskerville 2 by Anders Noren.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: