Node.js and JS Foundations Are Merging To Form OpenJS

The Linux Foundation today unveiled several major collaborative partnerships as it looks to cement the development of various open source projects that power much of the web. From a report: First off, the Node.js Foundation and the JS Foundation, which the Linux Foundation launched in 2016, are merging to form the OpenJS Foundation. The merger between the two chief organizations that focus on JavaScript comes six months after they publicly began to explore such a possibility with their communities. The OpenJS Foundation will focus on hosting and funding activities that support the growth of JavaScript and web technologies, the Linux Foundation said in a press release.

The OpenJS Foundation consists of 29 open source JavaScript projects including jQuery, Node.js, Appium, Dojo, and webpack. The merger is supported by 30 corporate and end user members including Google, Microsoft, IBM, PayPal, GoDaddy, and Joyent that recognize the “interconnected nature of the JavaScript


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/2VaDENoSyXw/nodejs-and-js-foundations-are-merging-to-form-openjs

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Linux 5.0 Released

An anonymous reader writes: Linus Torvalds has released Linux 5.0 in kicking off the kernel’s 28th year of development. Linux 5.0 features include AMD FreeSync support, open-source NVIDIA Turing GPU support, Intel Icelake graphics, Intel VT-d scalable mode, NXP PowerPC processors are now mitigated for Spectre Variant Two, and countless other additions. eWeek adds: Among the new features that have landed in Linux 5.0 is support for the Adiantum encryption system, developed by Google for low power devices. Google’s Android mobile operating system and ChromeOS desktop operating system both rely on the Linux kernel. “Storage encryption protects your data if your phone falls into someone else’s hands,” Paul Crowley and Eric Biggers, Android Security and Privacy Team at Google wrote in a blog post. “Adiantum is an innovation in cryptography designed to make storage encryption more efficient for devices without cryptographic acceleration, to ensure that all devices can be encrypted.


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/BlLvJC9bhRE/linux-50-released

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LibreOffice 6.2 Brings New Interfaces, Performance Improvements To the Open Source Office Suite

An anonymous reader shares a report: New interface styles and feature improvements are available in version 6.2 of LibreOffice — the most popular open-source office suite — released Thursday by The Document Foundation. As with any software update, bug fixes and feature enhancements are present, making this release a significant upgrade, particularly for users coming from Microsoft Office, or working with files created with those programs. LibreOffice now supports SVG-based icons for toolbars in the Breeze, Colibre, and Elementary icon sets as an experimental feature, to better support HiDPI displays increasingly found in notebook PCs. The Elementary icon set was also improved significantly, adding a 32px PNG version, and fixing inconsistencies between the 16, 24, and 32px versions, as well as adding more icons across the set to prevent reverting to defaults. In LibreOffice 6.2, the “Tabbed” interface is now available for Writer, Calc, Impress, and Draw, and is considered


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/gf7Nehj-Gk8/libreoffice-62-brings-new-interfaces-performance-improvements-to-the-open-source-office-suite

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Recommender systems, Part 1: Introduction to approaches and algorithms

Most large-scale commercial and social websites recommend options, such
as products or people to connect with, to users. Recommendation engines sort
through massive amounts of data to identify potential user preferences. This
article, the first in a two-part series, explains the ideas behind
recommendation systems and introduces you to the algorithms that power them.
In Part 2, learn about some open source recommendation engines you can put to
work.


Original URL: http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/opensource/library/os-recommender1/index.html?ca=drs-

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Recommender systems, Part 2: Introducing open source engines

Part 1 of this series introduces the basic approaches and algorithms for
the construction of recommendation engines. This concluding installment
explores some open source solutions for building recommendation systems and
demonstrates the use of two of them. The author also shows how to develop a
simple clustering application in Ruby and apply it to sample data.


Original URL: http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/opensource/library/os-recommender2/index.html?ca=drs-

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Apache OpenOffice, the Schrodinger’s Application: No One Knows If It’s Dead or Alive, No One Really Wants To Look Inside

British IT news outlet The Register looks at the myriad of challenges Apache OpenOffice faces today. From the report: Last year Brett Porter, then chairman of the Apache Software Foundation, contemplated whether a proposed official blog post on the state of Apache OpenOffice (AOO) might discourage people from downloading the software due to lack of activity in the project. No such post from the software’s developers surfaced. The languid pace of development at AOO, though, has been an issue since 2011 after Oracle (then patron of the project) got into a fork-fight with The Document Foundation, which created LibreOffice from the OpenOffice codebase, and asked developers backing the split to resign. Back in 2015, Red Hat developer Christian Schaller called OpenOffice “all but dead.” Assertions to that effect have continued since, alongside claims to the contrary. Almost a year ago, Jim Jagielski, a member of the Apache OpenOffice Project Management


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/SU6jT9pU_LM/apache-openoffice-the-schrodingers-application-no-one-knows-if-its-dead-or-alive-no-one-really-wants-to-look-inside

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LibreOffice 6.1 Released

The Document Foundation said on Wednesday it is releasing LibreOffice 6.1, the latest major update to its productivity suite. It is available to download for Linux, Windows, and macOS platforms. The new version offers, among other features, Colibre, a new icon theme for Windows based on Microsoft’s icon design guidelines, which it says, makes the office suite visually appealing for users coming from the Microsoft environment. The Document Foundation also reworked the image handling feature on LibreOffice to make it “significantly faster and smoother thanks to a new graphic manager and an improved image lifecycle, with some advantages also when loading documents in Microsoft proprietary formats.” Other new features and changes include: The reorganization of Draw menus with the addition of a new Page menu, for better UX consistency across the different modules. A major improvement for Base, only available in experimental mode: the old HSQLDB database engine has been


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/HUPkjVZ-h60/libreoffice-61-released

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NetBSD 8.0 Released

Slashdot reader fisted quotes NetBSD.org: The NetBSD Project is pleased to announce NetBSD 8.0, the sixteenth major release of the NetBSD operating system. This release brings stability improvements, hundreds of bug fixes, and many new features. Some highlights of the NetBSD 8.0 release are:
— USB stack rework, USB3 support added.
— In-kernel audio mixer (audio_system(9)).
— Reproducible builds
— PaX MPROTECT (W^X) memory protection enforced by default
— PaX ASLR enabled by default
— Position independent executables by default[…] NetBSD is free. All of the code is under non-restrictive licenses, and may be used without paying royalties to anyone.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/9MzV-QRGr0k/netbsd-80-released

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Introduction to Android development

Android is a popular computing platform based on the Linux operating
system. The initial commercial version of Android hit the market in 2008 in
the form of a mobile phone platform, back when the most popular cell phone for
a business user was the BlackBerry, when the iPhone was beginning to make
meaningful waves across all sectors, and when the majority of phone users were
still tapping out texts from a flip phone.


Original URL: http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/opensource/library/os-android-devel/index.html?ca=drs-

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