On This Day 25 Years Ago, the Web Became Public Domain

On April 30, 1993, CERN — the European Organization for Nuclear Research — announced that it was putting a piece of software developed by one of its researchers, Tim Berners-Lee, into the public domain. That software was a “global computer networked information system” called the World Wide Web, and CERN’s decision meant that anyone, anywhere, could run a website and do anything with it. From a report: While the proto-internet dates back to the 1960s, the World Wide Web as we know it had been invented four year earlier in 1989 by CERN employee Tim Berners-Lee. The internet at that point was growing in popularity among academic circles but still had limited mainstream utility. Scientists Robert Kahn and Vinton Cerf had developed Transmission Control Protocol and Internet Protocol (TCP/IP), which allowed for easier transfer of information. But there was the fundamental problem of how to organize all that information. In


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How to Boost Linux Server Internet Speed with TCP BBR

BBR (Bottleneck Bandwidth and RTT) is a relatively new congestion control algorithm written by software engineers at Google. It is the latest solution out of Google’s persistent attempts to make the Internet faster via…
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Apple Abandons Development of Wireless Routers, To Focus On Products That Return More Profit

Apple has disbanded its division that develops wireless routers in a move that further sharpens the company’s focus on consumer products that generate the bulk of its revenue, Bloomberg reports. From the article:Apple began shutting down the wireless router team over the past year, dispersing engineers to other product development groups, including the one handling the Apple TV. Apple hasn’t refreshed its routers since 2013 following years of frequent updates to match new standards from the wireless industry. The decision to disband the team indicates the company isn’t currently pushing forward with new versions of its routers. Routers are access points that connect laptops, iPhones and other devices to the web without a cable. Apple currently sells three wireless routers, the AirPort Express, AirPort Extreme, and AirPort Time capsule. The Time capsule doubles as a backup storage hard drive for Mac computers.

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IEEE Sets New Ethernet Standard That Brings 5X the Speed Without Cable Ripping

Reader coondoggie writes: As expected the IEEE has ratified a new Ethernet specification — IEEE P802.3bz — that defines 2.5GBASE-T and 5GBASE-T, boosting the current top speed of traditional Ethernet five-times without requiring the tearing out of current cabling. The Ethernet Alliance wrote that the IEEE 802.3bz Standard for Ethernet Amendment sets Media Access Control Parameters, Physical Layers and Management Parameters for 2.5G and 5Gbps Operation lets access layer bandwidth evolve incrementally beyond 1Gbps, it will help address emerging needs in a variety of settings and applications, including enterprise, wireless networks. Indeed, the wireless component may be the most significant implication of the standard as 2.5G and 5G Ethernet will allow connectivity to 802.11ac Wave 2 Access Points, considered by many to be the real driving force behind bringing up the speed of traditional NBase-T products.

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OVH Hosting Suffers From Record 1Tbps DDoS Attack Driven By 150K Devices

MojoKid writes: If you thought that the massive DDoS attack earlier this month on Brian Krebs’ security blog was record-breaking, take a look at what just happened to France-based hosting provider OVH. OVH was the victim of a wide-scale DDoS attack that was carried via a network of over 152,000 IoT devices. According to OVH founder and CTO Octave Klaba, the DDoS attack reached nearly 1 Tbps at its peak. Of those IoT devices participating in the DDoS attack, they were primarily comprised of CCTV cameras and DVRs. Many of these devices have improperly configured network settings, which leaves them ripe for the picking for hackers that would love to use them to carry out destructive attacks.The DDoS peaked at 990 Gbps on September 20th thanks to two concurrent attacks, and according to Klaba, the original botnet was capable of a 1.5 Tbps DDoS attack if each IP topped out


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‘Catastrophic’ DDoS Attack Hits Linode Servers Over Labor Day Weekend

An anonymous reader writes: A coordinated DDoS attack hit Linode (VPS provider) over the weekend, which the company has described as “catastrophic.” The attack targeted the company’s Atlanta data center, and was timed for the extended Labor Day weekend when the company had fewer employees on hand to deal with the incident. At the start of the year, after suffering a two-week-long DDoS attack, Linode announced a data breach with attackers accessing some user accounts. The company reset passwords after it detected the intrusions. Linode engineers told customers they were “experiencing a catastrophic DDoS attack which is being spread across hundreds of different IP addresses in rapid succession, making mitigation extremely difficult.” The report adds: “During all this time, connectivity to the service was down, affecting Linode customers such as Clojars, a repository of open source Clojure libraries that relies on the Linode infrastructure.”

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Warberry Pi Is a Dead-Simple Pen Testing Toolkit for the Raspberry Pi

The Raspberry Pi is a surprisingly useful tool to test the strength of your network
. To add another tool to your network testing kit, Warberry Pi is a self-contained set of scripts that run automatically when you plug your Raspberry Pi into a ethernet port.Read more…


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Linksys WRT Routers Won’t Block Open Source Firmware, Despite FCC Rules

The FCC requires all manufacturers to prevent users from having any direct ability to change RF parameters (frequency limits, output power, country codes, etc). The easiest way for a router manufacturer to comply with FCC’s guideline is to block the open source router firmware — which is what TP-Link has been doing. But thankfully, at least one router manufacturer doesn’t think blocking the firmware is the right way to go about it. Ars Technica reports: Linksys has been collaborating with chipmaker Marvell and the makers of OpenWrt to make sure its latest WRT routers can comply with the new rules without blocking open source firmware, company officials told Ars. Linksys’ effort stands in contrast with TP-Link, which said it would entirely prevent loading of open source firmware on its routers to satisfy the new Federal Communications Commission requirements. “They’re named WRT… it’s almost our responsibility to the open source community,” Linksys router product manager Vince La Duca told Ars. Cybersecurity experts have urged the router manufacturers to not block open source firmware.


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Comcast Is Raising Its Data Caps From 300GB To 1TB

An anonymous reader writes: Comcast has announced today it will be raising its monthly data cap of 300GB to 1TB beginning June 1st. They will however charge more to customers who want unlimited data. After June 1st, less people will need to buy unlimited data from the company. Previously, users were charged an extra $30 to $35 a month for unlimited data but now they will have to pay an additional $50 for unlimited data. “All of the data plans in our trial markets will move from a 300 gigabyte data plan to a terabyte by June 1st, regardless of the speed,” Comcast’s announcement today said. The reason for the change? Customers are exceeding the 300GB cap. In late 2013, Comcast said only 2 percent of its customers used more than 300GB of data a month. That number was up to 8 percent in late 2015.


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