No, Open Source Audacity Audio Editor Is Not ‘Spyware’

Over the Fourth of July weekend, a number of news outlets, including Slashdot, ran stories warning that the free and open-source audio editor Audacity may now be classified as spyware due to recent updates to its privacy policy. Ars Technica’s Jim Salter looked into these claims and found that that is not the case. An anonymous reader shares an excerpt from his report: FOSS-focused personal technology site SlashGear declares that although Audacity is free and open source, new owner Muse Group can “do some pretty damaging changes” — specifically meaning its new privacy policy and telemetry features, described as “overarching and vague.” FOSSPost goes even further, running the headline “Audacity is now a possible spyware, remove it ASAP.” The root of both sites’ concern is the privacy policy instigated by new Audacity owner Muse Group, who already published open source music notation tool MuseScore. The privacy policy, which was last


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/jpC0n6PRk4o/no-open-source-audacity-audio-editor-is-not-spyware

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Apple Music is Getting Lossless and Spatial Audio Support

Apple Music subscribers will find a big chunk of the catalog sounds better next month: The service is adding support for high-quality, lossless and spatial audio through Dolby Atmos at no additional cost, it said Monday. It’ll have 20 million lossless audio songs to start, with 75 million available by the end of 2021. From a report: To try out lossless audio, you should make sure you have the latest version of Apple Music and go to Settings, Music, then Audio Quality. You can choose different resolutions for cellular and Wi-Fi connections, or just download the track. The lossless tier starts at CD quality, which is 16 bit at 44.1 kHz, and goes up to 24 bit at 48 kHz and is playable natively on Apple devices. If you use external audio equipment, you can crank the quality up to 24 bit at 192 kHz. Further reading: AirPods Max, priced


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/VQtsb5Tpiuk/apple-music-is-getting-lossless-and-spatial-audio-support

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Amazon makes its lossless music streaming service a free upgrade

On the heels of this morning’s announcement of Apple’s next-generation music service featuring lossless audio and spatial audio with support for Dolby Atmos, Amazon is making a move likely aimed at retaining its own streaming music subscribers. The company says that going forward, its high-quality streaming tier, Amazon Music HD, will be made available to all eligible Amazon Music Unlimited subscribers at no extra cost.
Amazon first announced Amazon Music HD in fall 2019 with access to over 50 million songs that would stream in what Amazon is calling HD, with a bit depth of 16 bits and a sample rate of 44.1kHz (around CD-quality). It also promised “millions” more songs that would stream in Ultra HD, or 24-bit, with a sample rate of up to 192kHz (or better than CD quality).
Today, Amazon Music’s HD catalog has grown to more than 70 million songs and there are over 7 million Ultra


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Techcrunch/~3/RJ3vAD52vIU/

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Vinyl-Record Sales Top Compact Discs for First Time in 34 Years

Sales of vinyl records surpassed those of CDs in the U.S. for the first time since 1986, marking a key turning point for the format’s nostalgia-fueled resurgence. From a report: People spent $232.1 million on limited-play and extended-play records in the first half of the year, according to the Recording Industry Association of America, eclipsing the $129.9 million they spent on compact discs. Vinyl was the most popular way people listened to music throughout the 1970s and the early 1980s, at which point it gave way to tape cassettes — followed by CDs and digital formats. Each new format was more convenient than the last and suppressed interest in vinyl.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/oyPOMelDrTU/vinyl-record-sales-top-compact-discs-for-first-time-in-34-years

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Create Drum Loops With the Library of Congress’ ‘Citizen Beats’ Web App

I’m not saying I’m going to be the next Deadmau5, but the Library of Congress’ new “Citizen DJ” web app is pretty awesome to play around with—even if you don’t think you’ll use any of the sick beats it can create.Read more…


Original URL: https://lifehacker.com/create-drum-loops-with-the-library-of-congress-citizen-1843110303

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Billie Eilish Won Multiple Grammys Using Budget Studio Gear, Logic Pro X

Longtime Slashdot reader SpaceGhost writes: Per Engadget, Ms. Eilish and her older brother (Finneas O’Connell) produced her massively popular album When We All Fall Asleep, Where Do We Go? with minimal studio gear out of a bedroom studio in their parents’ house. They used equipment that many aspiring artists could afford (about $1,000 worth of Yamaha monitors for instance, and at first a $100 microphone.) The 18-year-old singer swept all four of the night’s biggest prizes — Best New Artist, Song of the Year, Record of the Year and Album of the Year — along with honors for Best Pop Vocal Album.

According to a Pro Sound Network interview with O’Connell, their production setup included a pair of $200 Yamaha HS5 nearfield monitors with a $450 H8S subwoofer, a Universal Audio Apollo 8 interface and Apple’s Logic Pro X. The duo reportedly used to record with a $99 Audio Technica


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/bde6pwKhazc/billie-eilish-won-multiple-grammys-using-budget-studio-gear-logic-pro-x

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How YACHT fed their old music to the machine and got a killer new album

The band YACHT, named for a mysterious sign seen in Portland around the turn of the century. [credit:
YACHT / Google I/O 2019 ]

The dance punk band YACHT has always felt like a somewhat techy act since debuting in the early 2000s. They famously recorded instrumental versions of two earlier albums and made them available for artists under a Creative Commons license at the Free Music Archive. Post-Snowden, they wrote a song called “Party at the NSA” and donated proceeds to the EFF. One album cover of theirs could only be accessed via fax initially (sent through a Web app YACHT developed to ID the nearest fax to groups of fans; OfficeMax must’ve loved it). Singer Claire L. Evans literally wrote the book (Broad Band) on female pioneers of the Internet.
So when Evans showed up at Google I/O this summer, we


Original URL: https://arstechnica.com/?p=1560697

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MIDI Association Explains ‘Capability Inquiry’ Features In MIDI 2.0

Friday the MIDI Association published an introduction to MIDI 2.0, describing updates to the already-evolving 36-year-old standard, including MIDI-CI, Profiles and Property Exchange:
MIDI 2.0 updates MIDI with new auto-configuration, extended resolution, increased expressiveness, and tighter timing — all while maintaining a high priority on backward compatibility. This major update of MIDI paves the way for a new generation of advanced interconnected MIDI devices, while still preserving interoperability with the millions of existing MIDI 1.0 devices. One of the core goals of MIDI 2.0 is to also enhance the MIDI 1.0 feature set whenever possible.

The additional capabilities that MIDI 2.0 brings to devices are enabled by MIDI-Capability Inquiry (MIDI-CI). The basic idea is that if devices have a bidirectional connection, they can exchange their capabilities with each other. Devices can share their configuration and what MIDI functions are supported. Devices use a bidirectional link to configure MIDI features when both


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/QIJBnxk2xQE/midi-association-explains-capability-inquiry-features-in-midi-20

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Learn the Basics of Beatmaking with This Open-Source Synthesizer App

iOS: One of the best parts of any science-fiction game or movie are those ominous tones that suggest a conversation or discovery is about to head south—a quintessential part of the soundtrack that adds a lot of atmosphere (and tension) to an experience. And now, thanks to an open-source iOS app, you can make your own…Read more…


Original URL: https://lifehacker.com/learn-the-basics-of-beatmaking-with-this-open-source-sy-1828030421

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