Microsoft releases Windows 10 20H1 Build 18917 with Windows Subsystem for Linux 2 (WSL 2)

Windows Insiders are currently testing builds from the 20H1 branch due out a year from now. The latest new flight, Build 18917, introduces download throttling and Windows Subsystem for Linux 2, as well as a whole host of other improvements. SEE ALSO: Free up over 17GB of storage space by cleaning up after the Windows 10 May 2019 Update How to use emoji to name files and folders on Windows 10 How to download any version of Windows 7, Windows 8.1 and Windows 10 (and Office) How to rollback and uninstall the Windows 10 May 2019 Update In response to… [Continue Reading]


Original URL: https://betanews.com/2019/06/13/windows-10-20h1-build-18917-wsl-2/

Original article

Microsoft and GitHub grow closer

Microsoft’s $7.5 billion acquisition of GitHub closed last October. Today, at its annual Build developer conference, Microsoft announced a number of new integrations between its existing services and GitHub. None of these are earth-shattering or change the nature of any of GitHub’s fundamental features, but they do show how Microsoft is starting to bring GitHub closer into the fold.
It’s worth noting that Microsoft isn’t announcing any major GitHub features at Build, though it was only a few weeks ago that the company made a major change by giving GitHub Free users access to unlimited private repositories. For major feature releases, GitHub has its own conference.
So what are the new integrations? Most of them center around identity management. That means GitHub Enterprise users can now use Azure Active Directory to access GitHub. Developers will also be able to use their existing GitHub accounts to log into Azure features like the Azure


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Techcrunch/~3/FVi3nXRKsp8/

Original article

Microsoft launches React Native for Windows

Microsoft today announced a new open-source project for React Native developers who want to target Windows. “React Native for Windows,” as the project is unsurprisingly called, is meant to be a new ‘performance-oriented’ implementation of React for Windows under the MIT License.
Being able to target Windows using React Native, a framework for cross-platform development that came out of Facebook, isn’t new. The framework, which allows developers to write their code in JavaScript and then run it on Android and iOS, already features plugins and extensions for targeting Windows and macOS.
With React Native for Windows, Microsoft is reimplementing React Native and rewriting many components in C++ to get maximum performance. It allows developers to target any Windows 10 device, including PCs, tablets, Xbox, mixed reality devices and more. With Microsoft backing the project, these developers will now be able to provide their users with faster, more fluid apps.
Microsoft the project is


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Techcrunch/~3/lhu9ozBoUzs/

Original article

Windows gets a new terminal

Windows 10 is getting a new terminal for command-line users, Microsoft announced at its Build developer conference today.
The new so-called “Windows Terminal” will launch in mid-June and promises to be a major update of the existing Windows Command Prompt and PowerShell experience. Indeed, it seems like the Terminal will essentially become the default environment for PowerShell, Command Prompt and Windows Subsystem for Linux users going forward.

The new terminal will feature faster GPU-accelerated text rending and “emoji-rich” fonts, because everything these days needs to support emojis, and those will sure help lighten up the command-line user experience. More importantly, though, the Windows Terminal will also support shortcuts, tabs, tear-away windows and theming, as well as extensions. It also will natively support Unicode and East Asian fonts.
The idea here, Microsoft says, is to “elevate the command-line user experience on Windows.”
The first preview of the new Windows Terminal is now available.


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Techcrunch/~3/FipJGy08Vao/

Original article

Microsoft launches Visual Studio Online, an online code editor

Microsoft today announced the private preview launch of Visual Studio Online, an online code editor the company is positioning as a companion to Visual Studio and Visual Studio Code.
The service is based on the Visual Studio Code, Microsoft’s popular free and open-source desktop code editor. This means Visual Studio Online will also support all the extensions that are currently available for Visual Studio Code, as well as popular features like Visual Studio Code workspaces. Support for IntelliCode, Microsoft’s tool for AI-assisted development that became generally available today, is also built-in.
The emphasis here is on Visual Studio Online being a ‘companion.’ It’s not meant to become a developer’s default environment but instead as a way to make a quick edit, review a pull request or join a Live Share session.
And if you think the name Visual Studio Online sounds familiar, that’s because Microsoft is actually recycling this name. Not that long


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Techcrunch/~3/jcKFflr-9O8/

Original article

Hands-on: First public previews of Chromium-based Edge are now out

Enlarge / There’s really no difference between how the Ars front page looks in Edge and Chrome.
Microsoft’s switch to using the Chromium engine to power its Edge browser was announced in December last year, and the first public preview build is out now. Canary builds, updated daily, and Dev builds, updated weekly, are available for Windows 10. Versions for other operating systems and a beta that’s updated every six weeks are promised to be coming soon.
Chromium is the open source browser project run by Google. It includes the Blink rendering engine (Google’s fork of Apple’s WebKit), V8 JavaScript engine, Google’s software-based sandboxing, and the browser user interface. Google builds on Chromium for its Chrome browser, and a number of third-party browsers, including Opera, Vivaldi, and Brave, also use Chromium.
As a result, every Chromium browser offers more or less the same performance and Web compatibility. Indeed, this is a big


Original URL: https://arstechnica.com/?p=1487813

Original article

What Microsoft’s ‘full-Chromium’ Edge browser brings to the table

Nearly three months ago, Microsoft waved the browser white flag, saying it would scrap Edge’s original rendering engine and replace it with Blink, the engine that also powers Google’s Chrome.To read this article in full, please click here(Insider Story)


Original URL: https://www.computerworld.com/article/3385079/what-microsofts-full-chromium-edge-browser-brings-to-the-table.html#tk.rss_all

Original article

Time’s up! Microsoft is flipping the IE 10 kill switch in 2020

Microsoft has been trying to encourage users away from Windows 7 for a while now, with support officially ending next year. But it’s not just the operating system that is reaching the end of the line; Microsoft is also warning the remaining Internet Explorer 10 users that support ends in 2020, advising that it is time to migrate to Internet Explorer 11. In a warning posted on its IT Pro Blog, Microsoft says that after January 2020, Internet Explorer 10 will no longer be supported. The company states, quite definitively, that it will “not release any security or non-security updates,… [Continue Reading]


Original URL: https://betanews.com/2019/01/30/end-if-ie-10-support/

Original article

Microsoft updates Teams for education, unveils low-cost Windows 10 devices

Microsoft is ramping up efforts to appeal to the education market, with updates to its Teams group messaging app that supports collaboration between students, teachers and staff members. Among the features announced at the Bett 2019 education technology conference in London this week: integration with student information systems and the ability for teachers to grade school work on mobile devices. Microsoft also unveiled several low-budget Windows 10-based laptops and two-in-ones to take on Google Chromebooks, which have proved popular in schools.To read this article in full, please click here


Original URL: https://www.computerworld.com/article/3336197/collaboration/microsoft-updates-teams-for-education-unveils-low-cost-windows-10-devices.html#tk.rss_all

Original article

Proudly powered by WordPress | Theme: Baskerville 2 by Anders Noren.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: