Goodbye Microsoft Edge, welcome Microsoft (Chromium) Edge

Enlarge / It still takes a connoisseur to spot the differences between Chromium-based Edge and Google Chrome at a glance. (credit: Jim Salter)
As of Wednesday, January 15, Microsoft will begin pushing its new, Chromium-based version of the Edge browser to Windows 10 Home and Pro users. We covered the beta version of Chromium-based Edge in November. The beta was still pretty raw then—but “raw” is a relative term. The new Edge project began with a complete and fully functional Web browser—Chromium—so it worked fine for browsing the Web. There were just a few rough edges as far as installing extensions, logging into them, and the like.
We’ve seen one take waxing nostalgic for the old, purely Microsoft developed version of Edge, but we don’t think many people will miss it much. It’s not so much that Edge was a bad browser, per se—it just didn’t serve much of a purpose.


Original URL: https://arstechnica.com/?p=1643613

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Here is the first stable release of Microsoft’s new Edge browser

Right on schedule, Microsoft today released the first stable version of its new Chromium-based Edge browser, just over a year after it first announced that it would stop developing its own browser engine and go with what has, for better or worse, become the industry standard.
You can now download the stable version for Windows 7, 8 and 10, as well as macOS, directly. If you are on Windows 10, you can also wait for the automatic update to kick in, but that may take a while.
Since all of the development has happened in the open, with various pre-release channels, there are no surprises in this release. Some of the most interesting forward-looking features like Collections, Microsoft’s new take on bookmarking, are still only available in the more experimental pre-release channels. That will quickly change, though, since Edge is now on a six-week release cycle.
As I’ve said throughout the development cycle,


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Techcrunch/~3/eAU3mM81jk4/

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Microsoft will honor Californian privacy laws across the entire US

Microsoft has announced that it plans to honor the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) across the whole of the United States, not just in California. In Europe, GDPR (General Data Protection Regulation) has done a lot to protect people’s privacy, and some companies have opted to voluntarily apply similar policies in the US. Microsoft, however, is the first major US company to say it will expand CCPA outside of its home state, bringing greater privacy protection to people across America. See also: Microsoft listens to feedback and removes Downloads folder from Disk Cleanup Microsoft’s Surface Pro X is better than… [Continue Reading]


Original URL: https://betanews.com/2019/11/12/microsoft-ccpa/

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Microsoft launches two new open source projects for developers — OAM and Dapr

Continuing its embracing of open source, Microsoft has today announced two new open source projects. The first is Open Application Model (OAM), a new standard for developing and operating applications on Kubernetes and other platforms The second project is Dapr (Distributed Application Runtime), designed to make it easier to build microservice applications. Microsoft says that both OAM and Dapr “help developers remove barriers when building applications for cloud and edge”. See also: Microsoft enables Tamper Protection by default in Windows 10 Microsoft turns to AI to clean out bad language from Xbox Live chats How to avoid Microsoft’s problematic Windows… [Continue Reading]


Original URL: https://betanews.com/2019/10/16/microsoft-open-source-oam-dapr/

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Microsoft introduces Windows 10X for dual-screen devices

At its annual Surface hardware event in New York, Microsoft today announced the expected set of updates to its existing hardware lineup. The biggest surprise, though, was surely the announcement of the company’s dual-screen Surface Neo, which will go on sale before the 2020 holiday season. To make this kind of dual-screen device possible, Microsoft also built a new version of Windows 10: Windows 10X.
Microsoft says it’s announcing the hardware and software today in order to get it into the hands of developers ahead of the launch.
Just like HoloLens, Surface Hub and Xbox use the core technologies of Windows 10, the dual-screen Surface, too, will run this new version, as will dual-screen devices from Dell, HP, Lenovo and other partners. Unsurprisingly, these devices — and Windows 10X — will feature improved pen support (and a virtual keyboard).

Microsoft teases Neo dual-screen Surface, set to debut holiday 2020

Windows 10X is the result


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Techcrunch/~3/KB2TWOPxU90/

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Web scraping doesn’t violate anti-hacking law, appeals court rules

Enlarge / LinkedIn CEO Jeff Weiner. (credit: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images)
Scraping a public website without the approval of the website’s owner isn’t a violation of the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act, an appeals court ruled on Monday. The ruling comes in a legal battle that pits Microsoft-owned LinkedIn against a small data-analytics company called hiQ Labs.
HiQ scrapes data from the public profiles of LinkedIn users, then uses the data to help companies better understand their own workforces. After tolerating hiQ’s scraping activities for several years, LinkedIn sent the company a cease-and-desist letter in 2017 demanding that hiQ stop harvesting data from LinkedIn profiles. Among other things, LinkedIn argued that hiQ was violating the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act, America’s main anti-hacking law.
This posed an existential threat to hiQ because the LinkedIn website is hiQ’s main source of data about clients’ employees. So hiQ sued LinkedIn, seeking not


Original URL: https://arstechnica.com/?p=1564309

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Windows 10 KB4512941 causes high CPU usage by Cortana

Following the release of KB4512941 for Windows 10 version 1903, users have noticed a huge leap in CPU usage by Cortana. After installing the cumulative update, the Cortana process SearchUI.exe is making much higher use of the CPU for many people. The problem can arise on systems where Bing Search has been disabled, and a series of workarounds have been suggested while Microsoft works on addressing the problem. See also: Microsoft releases Windows 10 20H1 Build 18970 with cloud recovery feature and redesigned tablet experience Microsoft faces another European investigation over Windows 10 privacy concerns Got Bluetooth problems in Windows… [Continue Reading]


Original URL: https://betanews.com/2019/09/02/windows-10-kb4512941-high-cpu-usage-cortana/

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Windows Update To Fix Critical ‘Wormable’ Flaws May Break VB Apps

“This week’s Windows updates fix critical ‘wormable’ [Bluekeep] flaws but may also break Visual Basic apps, macros, and scripts,” warns ZDNet:

“After installing this update, applications that were made using Visual Basic 6 (VB6), macros using Visual Basic for Applications (VBA), and scripts or apps using Visual Basic Scripting Edition (VBScript) may stop responding and you may receive an ‘invalid procedure call error’,” Microsoft says. The issue affects all supported versions of Windows 10, Windows 7, Windows 8.1, and their corresponding server versions. “Microsoft is presently investigating this issue and will provide an update when available,” the company said.

Microsoft didn’t offer an explanation for the problem but it did flag earlier this month that it will move ahead with sunsetting VBScript, by disabling it in IE11 by default via an update in this week’s patch. “The change to disable VBScript will take effect in the upcoming cumulative updates for Windows


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/HrVsdAXpFNg/windows-update-to-fix-critical-wormable-flaws-may-break-vb-apps

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Windows 10’s fall upgrade: Yep, it’s a service pack

Microsoft last week tacitly confirmed that this year’s fall upgrade for Windows 10 will, in fact, be service pack-like, in effect a rerun of the May 2019 Update, aka Windows 10 1903On Thursday, Microsoft delivered two previews to what it continues to call 19H2, a reference to the second-half upgrade in its twice-annual cadence for Windows 10. Some Insiders – the volunteer participants in the Windows 10 beta program – would get one build while others would get another.[ Related: Windows 10 May 2019 Update: Key enterprise features ]The difference? “A subset of Insiders in the Slow ring will have features turned off by default, and another subset will have them turned on by default,” wrote Dona Sarkar and Brandon LeBlanc, Microsoft employees and the public faces of Windows Insider. “We are testing the ability to ship these updates with features turned off by default so that we can then


Original URL: https://www.computerworld.com/article/3431896/windows-10s-fall-upgrade-yep-its-a-service-pack.html#tk.rss_all

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