Microsoft Is Shutting Down Mixer and Partnering With Facebook Gaming

An anonymous reader quotes a report from The Verge: Microsoft is closing its Mixer service on July 22nd and plans to move existing partners over to Facebook Gaming. The surprise announcement means Mixer partners and streamers will be transitioned to Facebook Gaming starting today, and Microsoft will no longer operate Mixer as a service in a month’s time. Microsoft is partnering with Facebook to transition existing Mixer viewers and streamers over to Facebook Gaming in the coming weeks. On July 22nd, all Mixer sites and apps will automatically redirect to Facebook Gaming. Existing Mixer Partners will be granted partner status with Facebook Gaming, and any streamers using the Mixer monetization program will be granted eligibility for Facebook’s Level Up program. Mixer viewers with outstanding Ember balances, channel subscriptions, or Mixer Pro subscriptions will receive Xbox gift card credit.

Microsoft’s choice to partner with Facebook is clearly a strategic one that’s


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/E0FT9O_ddbk/microsoft-is-shutting-down-mixer-and-partnering-with-facebook-gaming

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Microsoft Launches Windows Terminal 1.0, Unveils GPU Support and Linux GUI Apps in WSL

At Build 2020 today, Microsoft gave developers a slew of new tools to coax them into using Windows over macOS or Linux. From a report: Windows Terminal is now out of preview for enterprises, and Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL) 2 is getting support for GPUs, Linux GUI apps, and a simplified install experience. Microsoft even released a Windows Package Manager in preview. Windows 10 runs on 1 billion monthly active devices (PCs, Xbox One consoles, and HoloLens devices), making it a massive platform for developers to target. […] Microsoft today released Windows Terminal 1.0, which means it is stable for enterprise use. The open source application features multiple tabs, panes, tear-away windows, shortcuts, Unicode and UTF-8 character support, emojis, ligatures, extensions, GPU-accelerated text rendering engine, and custom themes, styles, and configurations. Windows Terminal is for users of PowerShell, Cmd, WSL, and other command-line tools. Microsoft also unveiled WSL improvements


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/s1clyXeh9p8/microsoft-launches-windows-terminal-10-unveils-gpu-support-and-linux-gui-apps-in-wsl

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Microsoft releases Windows Terminal 1.0, download it now

At its Build developer conference last year, Microsoft took the wraps off its Linux-inspired Windows Terminal. This lets users access the Command Prompt, PowerShell, and WSL (Windows Subsystem for Linux) in the one place. Since then, Microsoft has been adding additional features, such as multiple panes and tab re-ordering, across a number of preview versions. Most recently the software giant added mouse support and duplicate panes. Today, at the virtual Build 2020, the company announces that Terminal has hit the 1.0 milestone. Microsoft says of the new Terminal: The Windows Terminal is a modern, fast, efficient, powerful, and productive terminal… [Continue Reading]


Original URL: https://betanews.com/2020/05/19/windows-terminal-1-0/

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It’s time to squirrel away a clean copy of Win10 version 1909

Downloading a clean Win10 version 1909 is remarkably easy, doesn’t take very long (if you have a fast internet connection anyway), and may well save your keister at some point. You can even download it from your phone or iPad.Don’t worry, it’s 100% legal and, at worst, will occupy about 8GB on a USB drive for a while. Nothin’ to it.Step 1. If you’re running Win10, use the Media Creation Tool
If you have a license for Windows 10, the easiest way to get version 1909 involves Microsoft’s Media Creation Tool. Go to the Download Windows 10 site and, under “Create Windows 10 installation media,” click the link marked “Download tool now.” To read this article in full, please click here


Original URL: https://www.computerworld.com/article/3543316/it-s-time-to-squirrel-away-a-clean-copy-of-win10-version-1909.html#tk.rss_all

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Microsoft Releases PowerShell 7 for Windows, macOS and Linux

Microsoft has announced that its cross-platform automation tool and configuration framework PowerShell 7 is now generally available. From a report: Available for Windows, macOS and Linux, PowerShell 7 sees Microsoft moving from .NET Core 2.x to 3.1 which enables greater backwards compatibility with existing Windows PowerShell modules thanks to the resurrection of numerous .NET Framework APIs. The cross-platform nature of PowerShell 7 means that Ubuntu, openSUSE, Fedora, Debian and other Linux distro are embraced. Joey Aiello, product manager of PowerShell, says: “If you weren’t able to use PowerShell Core 6.x in the past because of module compatibility issues, this might be the first time you get to take advantage of some of the awesome features we already delivered since we started the Core project!”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/XBJwou6BiHQ/microsoft-releases-powershell-7-for-windows-macos-and-linux

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Search is down for Windows 10 users

If you’ve tried to search for something in Windows 10 this morning you’ll likely have been greeted by an empty search window. Type something in, and you’ll get no results. Microsoft has yet to acknowledge the issue, but the problem seems to be caused by Bing’s new integration. SEE ALSO: Microsoft’s new Windows 10 search feature is just a way to force Bing and Edge on to users Reddit users have reported that the issue can be overcome by disabling Bing with this registry hack from How To Geek, but it seems likely this is only a temporary problem and… [Continue Reading]


Original URL: https://betanews.com/2020/02/05/search-down-windows-10/

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Download a free Windows 10 virtual machine to keep using Microsoft Edge Legacy and Internet Explorer 11

Having now embraced the same engine as Chrome, the Chromium-based Edge is now Microsoft’s default browser. If you want to keep using Microsoft Edge Legacy and Internet Explorer 11 for some reason, Microsoft has opened up a way to do so — and to do so safely. The company has released virtual machine images that include both web browser. Available free of charge, the images are available for a range of virtualization platforms. See also: Most antivirus companies will continue to support Windows 7 Microsoft releases update to fix Explorer problems in Windows 10 Microsoft pledges to patch Internet Explorer… [Continue Reading]


Original URL: https://betanews.com/2020/02/01/windows-10-virtual-machines-edge-legacy-ie-11/

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Microsoft has a new PowerToy utility on the way — PowerLauncher

Over the last nine months Microsoft has been drip-feeding us new PowerToys for Windows 10. So far we’ve seen FancyZones, Shortcut Guide and PowerRename, and now the company is preparing to add another one. PowerLauncher is — or will be — a quick launch tool for launching apps, and it’s aimed at power users. Not only is it open source like the rest of the PowerToy collection, there is the promise that it will be extendible through the use of plugins. PowerLauncher is currently being reviewed for release, but there’s already a good deal of information about the utility available… [Continue Reading]


Original URL: https://betanews.com/2020/01/22/microsoft-powertoys-powerlauncher/

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Goodbye Microsoft Edge, welcome Microsoft (Chromium) Edge

Enlarge / It still takes a connoisseur to spot the differences between Chromium-based Edge and Google Chrome at a glance. (credit: Jim Salter)
As of Wednesday, January 15, Microsoft will begin pushing its new, Chromium-based version of the Edge browser to Windows 10 Home and Pro users. We covered the beta version of Chromium-based Edge in November. The beta was still pretty raw then—but “raw” is a relative term. The new Edge project began with a complete and fully functional Web browser—Chromium—so it worked fine for browsing the Web. There were just a few rough edges as far as installing extensions, logging into them, and the like.
We’ve seen one take waxing nostalgic for the old, purely Microsoft developed version of Edge, but we don’t think many people will miss it much. It’s not so much that Edge was a bad browser, per se—it just didn’t serve much of a purpose.


Original URL: https://arstechnica.com/?p=1643613

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