Linux Kernel 5.15 Will Have Improved NTFS File System Support

Paragon’s NTFS driver was merged by Linux creator Linus Torvalds earlier this month, bringing reliable read and write functionality for this file system to Linux kernel 5.15.
Compared with the existing FUSE-based open source NTFS driver, the Paragon’s NTFS3 driver undoubtedly wins in terms of functionality and performance. The driver fully supports reads, writes, and many other features not found with the existing Linux driver. Learn more about this new Linux kernel support here.
The post Linux Kernel 5.15 Will Have Improved NTFS File System Support appeared first on Linux Today.


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/linuxtoday/linux/~3/B9Got19PDgY/

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OpenShot Video Editor 2.6.0 Released with Many Improvements

OpenShot Video Editor 2.6.0 comes with the all necessary tools a user needs to create exclusive videos for online sharing channels like YouTube. OpenShot is a free video editing software for Linux, macOS, and Windows. It is an easy-to-use video editor that surprises its users with the power it has.
The post OpenShot Video Editor 2.6.0 Released with Many Improvements appeared first on Linux Today.


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/linuxtoday/linux/~3/5c7-PL5D3vA/

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Ubuntu 22.04 LTS Slated for Release on April 21st, 2022

While Canonical is still working hard to finish the last details of the forthcoming Ubuntu 21.10 (Impish Indri) release, which will see the light of day on October 14th, 2021, they are already planning on the next major release, Ubuntu 22.04.
But Ubuntu 22.04 will not be an ordinary release. In fact, it will be the next LTS (Long-Term Support) series, supported for at least 5 years, and, according to the release schedule published by Brian Murray, development will kick off with the usual toolchain upload just a week after the release of Ubuntu 21.10, on October 21st. Learn more about the future of Ubuntu 22.04 LTS here.
The post Ubuntu 22.04 LTS Slated for Release on April 21st, 2022 appeared first on Linux Today.


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/linuxtoday/linux/~3/J1EhcWblfO8/

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Linux Kernel 5.14 Officially Released, This Is What’s New

Less than two months in development, the Linux 5.14 kernel brings cool new features to the table, such as the merge of the core scheduling functionality to better protect our Linux computers against some Spectre vulnerabilities, the burstable CFS bandwidth controller, or the new mechanism for better controlling resource limits within user namespaces.
Also new is an I/O priority controller for control groups, designed for managing the priority of block-I/O requests generated by the members of each group, a new rate limiter for the split-lock detection feature on the x86 architecture for sleeping processes that create a split lock, as well as a new PCI-over-virtio driver for supporting PCI drivers in user-mode. Learn more about the new release here.
The post Linux Kernel 5.14 Officially Released, This Is What’s New appeared first on Linux Today.


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/linuxtoday/linux/~3/81UmCShjhNE/

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Slackware 15.0 RC1 Released

Long-time Slashdot reader ArchieBunker writes:

Slackware, one of oldest Linux distributions, has just announced the long awaited version 15.0 RC1 is available for download from the usual mirrors. Here’s the changelog.

Phoronix points out it’s been nearly a decade since Slackware 14

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/2lg0dZFMKBE/slackware-150-rc1-released

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Linux Runlevels Explained

In this tutorial, we will learn about the various runlevels that exist within a Linux system.
There are times when a Linux system boots either into a Graphical User Interface (GUI) or a command line. A Linux system may also boot as a single-user system, which means that it is available only to a single user, the superuser used for system maintenance.
The way the Linux system boots and operates is known as the system’s state, known as the runlevel.
The post Linux Runlevels Explained appeared first on Linux Today.


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/linuxtoday/linux/~3/yDpSa7J0GIQ/

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VirtualBox 6.1.24 Released with Support for Linux 5.13 and Ubuntu Specific Kernels

VirtualBox 6.1.24 comes almost three months after version 6.1.22 to introduce support for the latest and greatest Linux 5.13 kernel series, for both hosts and guests. As you can imagine, this means that you can now run GNU/Linux distributions powered by Linux kernel 5.13 on virtual machines, or install VirtualBox on a distro running Linux 5.13.
For the first time, VirtualBox introduces support for kernels that are specific to a certain GNU/Linux distribution. In this release, there’s support for Ubuntu-specific kernels, as well as kernels that are specific to the SUSE Linux Enterprise Server and Desktop (SLES/SLED) 15 SP3 (Service Pack 3) operating systems.
The post VirtualBox 6.1.24 Released with Support for Linux 5.13 and Ubuntu Specific Kernels appeared first on Linux Today.


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/linuxtoday/linux/~3/LnSFtGVr8Sg/

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Sequoia: Linux kernel security flaw gives unprivileged users root access

A vulnerability has been discovered in the Linux kernel that makes it possible to gain root access on a number of popular distributions, including Ubuntu, Debian and Fedora. The flaw has been named Sequoia, and it exists in the filesystem layer. The security issue is thought to affect all versions of the Linux kernel released since 2014, meaning that a large number of distros are vulnerable. Specifically, the flaw is a size_t-to-int type conversion vulnerability that can be exploited to elevate privileges. See also: Microsoft has its own Linux distro called CBL-Mariner After waking up from PrintNightmare, Microsoft has a… [Continue Reading]


Original URL: https://betanews.com/2021/07/21/sequoia-linux-kernel-security-flaw-gives-unprivileged-users-root-access/

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