New for AWS Lambda – Use Any Programming Language and Share Common Components

I remember the excitement when AWS Lambda was announced in 2014! Four years on, customers are using Lambda functions for many different use cases. For example, iRobot is using AWS Lambda to provide compute services for their Roomba robotic vacuum cleaners, Fannie Mae to run Monte Carlo simulations for millions of mortgages, Bustle to serve billions of requests for their digital content.
Today, we are introducing two new features that are going to make serverless development even easier:
Lambda Layers, a way to centrally manage code and data that is shared across multiple functions.
Lambda Runtime API, a simple interface to use any programming language, or a specific language version, for developing your functions.
These two features can be used together: runtimes can be shared as layers so that developers can pick them up and use their favorite programming language when authoring Lambda functions.
Let’s see how they work more in detail.
Lambda Layers
When building serverless applications, it


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New – AWS Transfer for SFTP – Fully Managed SFTP Service for Amazon S3

Many organizations use SFTP (Secure File Transfer Protocol) as part of long-established data processing and partner integration workflows. While it would be easy to dismiss these systems as “legacy,” the reality is that they serve a useful purpose and will continue to do so for quite some time. We want to help our customers to move these workflows to the cloud in a smooth, non-disruptive way.
AWS Transfer for SFTP Today we are launching AWS Transfer for SFTP, a fully-managed, highly-available SFTP service. You simply create a server, set up user accounts, and associate the server with one or more Amazon Simple Storage Service (S3) buckets. You have fine-grained control over user identity, permissions, and keys. You can create users within Transfer for SFTP, or you can make use of an existing identity provider. You can also use IAM policies to control the level of access granted to each user.


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New AWS Resource Access Manager – Cross-Account Resource Sharing

As I have discussed in the past, our customers use multiple AWS accounts for many different reasons. Some of them use accounts to create administrative and billing boundaries; others use them to control the blast radius around any mistakes that they make.
Even though all of this isolation is a net positive for our customers, it turns out that certain types of sharing can be useful and beneficial. For example, many customers want to create resources centrally and share them across accounts in order to reduce management overhead and operational costs.
AWS Resource Access Manager The new AWS Resource Access Manager (RAM) facilitates resource sharing between AWS accounts. It makes it easy to share resources within your AWS Organization and can be used from the Console, CLI, or through a set of APIs. We are launching with support for Route 53 Resolver Rules (announced yesterday in Shaun’s excellent post) and


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New – Train Custom Document Classifiers with Amazon Comprehend

Amazon Comprehend gives you the power to process natural-language text at scale (read my introductory post, Amazon Comprehend – Continuously Trained Natural Language Processing, to learn more). After launching late 2017 with support for English and Spanish, we have added customer-driven features including Asynchronous Batch Operations, Syntax Analysis, support for additional languages (French, German, Italian, and Portuguese), and availability in more regions.
Using automatic machine learning (AutoML), Comprehend lets you create custom Natural Language Processing (NLP) models using data that you already have, without the need to learn the ins and outs of ML. Based on your data set and use case, it automatically selects the right algorithm, tuning parameter, builds, and tests the resulting model.
If you already have a collection of tagged documents—support tickets, call center conversations (via Amazon Transcribe, forum posts, and so forth)— you can use them as a starting point. In this context, tagged simply


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New – Redis 5.0 Compatibility for Amazon ElastiCache

Earlier this year we announced Redis 4.0 compatibility for Amazon ElastiCache. In that post, Randall explained how ElastiCache for Redis clusters can scale to terabytes of memory and millions of reads and writes per second! Other recent improvements to Amazon ElastiCache for Redis include:
Read Replica Scaling – Support for adding or removing read replica nodes to a Redis Cluster, along with a reduction of up to 40% in cluster creation time.
PCI DSS Compliance – Certification as Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS) compliant. This allows you to use ElastiCache for Redis (engine versions 4.0.10 and higher) to build low-latency, high-throughput applications that process sensitive payment card data.
FedRAMP Authorized and Available in AWS GovCloud (US) – United States government customers and their partners can use ElastiCache for Redis to process and store their FedRAMP systems and data for mission-critical, high-impact workloads in the AWS GovCloud (US)


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New Lower-Cost, AMD-Powered M5a and R5a EC2 Instances

From the start, AWS has focused on choice and economy. Driven by a never-ending torrent of customer requests that power our well-known Virtuous Cycle, I think we have delivered on both over the years:
Choice – AWS gives you choices in a wide range of dimensions including locations (18 operational geographic regions, 4 more in the works, and 1 local region), compute models (instances, containers, and serverless), EC2 instance types, relational and NoSQL database choices, development languages, and pricing/purchase models.
Economy – We have reduced prices 67 times so far, and work non-stop to drive down costs and to make AWS an increasingly better value over time. We study usage patterns, identify areas for innovation and improvement, and deploy updates across the entire AWS Cloud on a very regular and frequent basis.
Today I would like to tell you about our latest development, one that provides you with a choice


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Check it Out – New AWS Pricing Calculator for EC2 and EBS

The blog post that we published over a decade ago to launch the Simple Monthly Calculator still shows up on our internal top-10 lists from time to time! Since that post was published, we have extended, redesigned, and even rebuilt the calculator a time or two.
New Calculator Starting with a blank screen, an empty code repo, and plenty of customer feedback, we are building a brand-new AWS Pricing Calculator. The new calculator is designed to help you estimate and understand your eventual AWS costs. We did our best to avoid excessive jargon and to make the calculations obvious, transparent, and accessible. You can see the options that are available to you, explore the associated costs, and make high-quality data-driven decisions.
We’re starting out with support for EC2 instances, EBS volumes, and a very wide variety of purchasing models, with plans to add support for more services as quickly as


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Amazon RDS Update – Console Update, RDS Recommendations, Performance Insights, M5 Instances, MySQL 8, MariaDB 10.3, and More

It is time for a quick Amazon RDS update. I’ve got lots of news to share:
Console Update – The RDS Console has a fresh, new look.
RDS Recommendations – You now get recommendations that will help you to configure your database instances per our best practices.
Performance Insights for MySQL – You can peer deep inside of MySQL and understand more about how your queries are processed.
M5 Instances – You can now use MySQL and MariaDB on M5 instances.
MySQL 8.0 – You can now use MySQL 8.0 in production form.
MariaDB 10.3 – You can now use MariaDB 10.3 in production form.
Let’s take a closer look…
Console Update The RDS Console took on a fresh, new look earlier this year. We made it available to you in preview form during development, and it is now the standard experience for all AWS users. You can see an


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Now Available – Amazon EC2 High Memory Instances with 6, 9, and 12 TB of Memory, Perfect for SAP HANA

The Altair 8800 computer that I built in 1977 had just 4 kilobytes of memory. Today I was able to use an EC2 instance with 12 terabytes (12 tebibytes to be exact) of memory, almost 4 billion times as much!
The new Amazon EC2 High Memory Instances let you take advantage of other AWS services including Amazon Elastic Block Store (EBS), Amazon Simple Storage Service (S3), AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM), Amazon CloudWatch, and AWS Config. They are designed to allow AWS customers to run large-scale SAP HANA installations, and can be used to build production systems that provide enterprise-grade data protection and business continuity.
Here are the specs:
Instance Name
Memory
Logical Processors
Dedicated EBS Bandwidth
Network Bandwidth
u-6tb1.metal
6 TiB
448
14 Gbps
25 Gbps
u-9tb1.metal
9 TiB
448
14 Gbps
25 Gbps


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