Use GitLab runners on Kubernetes

In a new generation of software development, also known as Cloud Native, it simply requires pipelines to be successful. You need to have a comfort blanket for your development, which is the main why CD/CI are so prevalent in our industry now. There are multiple ways to create a standarized pipelne and luckily there is already some good starting points to get yourself bootstrapped.
Scope
This tutorial’s purpose is to teach you how to connect your IBM Cloud Kubernetes Service cluster to a hosted GitLab instance so that you can leverage your own infrastructure for continuous integration and continuous deployment.
Much of this tutorial is influenced by the official documentation from GitLab.
Prerequisites
Before you begin going through the steps in this tutorial, you will need the following:
A Kubernetes cluster on the IBM Cloud.
And an IP that your GitLab instance can reach.

An IBM Cloud CLI installed and configured on your work station.

Steps
Authenticate with the IBM


Original URL: https://developer.ibm.com/tutorials/use-gitlab-runners-on-kubernetes/

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DigitalOcean launches its container platform

DigitalOcean is getting into the container game. While it’s still best known for its affordable virtual private server hosting, the company’s ambition is to become a major player in the cloud computing space. Hosting was just the first part of that plan, and with its Spaces storage services, for example, it signaled its future plans.
Since there’s no way to get around talking about software containers these days, it’s probably no surprise that the company today announced the launch of its Kubernetes -based container service.
The service is now in early preview (and you can sign up here) and the company plans to make it widely available later this year.
“We’ve always been devoted to providing simple solutions for developers — starting with our cloud servers, Droplets,” said DigitalOcean VP of Product Shiven Ramji. “This product is no exception, allowing developers to focus on successfully shipping their applications while not being burdened by the


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RedHat’s CoreOS launches a new toolkit for managing Kubernetes applications

CoreOS, the Linux distribution and container management startup Red Hat acquired for $250 million earlier this year, today announced the Operator Framework, a new open source toolkit for managing Kubernetes clusters.
CoreOS first talked about operators in 2016. The general idea here is to encode the best practices for deploying and managing container-based applications as code. “The way we like to think of this is that the operators are basically a picture of the best employee you have,” Red Hat OpenShift product manager Rob Szumski told me. Ideally, the Operator Framework frees up the operations team from doing all the grunt work of managing applications and allows them to focus on higher-level tasks. And at the same time, it also removes the error-prone humans from the process since the operator will always follow the company rulebook.

“To make the most of Kubernetes, you need a set of cohesive APIs to extend in order


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Heptio launches an open-source load balancer for Kubernetes and OpenStack

Heptio is one of the more interesting companies in the container ecosystem. In part, that’s due to the simple fact that it was founded by Craig McLuckie and Joe Beda, two of the three engineers behind the original Kubernetes project, but also because of the technology it’s developing and the large amount of funding it has raised to date.

As the company announced today, it saw its revenue grow 140 percent from the last quarter of 2017 to the first quarter of 2018. In addition, Heptio says its headcount quadrupled since the beginning of 2017. Without any actual numbers, that kind of data doesn’t mean all that much. It’s easy to achieve high-growth numbers if you’re starting out from zero, after all. But it looks like things are going well at the company and that the team is finding its place in the fast-growing Kubernetes ecosystem.
In addition to announcing these numbers,


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GitLab gets a native integration with Google’s Kubernetes Engine

GitLab, one of the most popular self-hosted Git services, has been on a bit of a roll lately. Barely two weeks after launching its integration with GitHub, the company today announced that developers on its platform can now automatically spin up a cluster on Google’s Kubernetes Engine (GKE) and deploy their applications to it with just a few clicks.
To build this feature, the company collaborated with Google, but this integration also makes extensive use of GitLab’s existing Auto DevOps tool, which already offers similar functionality for working with containers. Auto DevOps aims to take all the grunt work out of setting up CI/CD pipelines and deploying to containers.
“Before the GKE integration, GitLab users needed an in-depth understanding of Kubernetes to manage their own clusters,” said GitLab CEO Sid Sijbrandij in today’s announcement. “With this collaboration, we’ve made it simple for our users to set up a managed deployment environment on [Google Cloud


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Kubernetes on Microsoft’s Azure Container Service is now generally available

 Kubernetes, the Google-incubated open source container orchestration system, is quickly becoming the de facto standard for managing large container deployments. Microsoft launched a preview of support for Kubernetes in its Azure Container Service last year; today it is taking this service out of beta and making it generally available. Read More


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Fabric8: An Open Source Microservices Platform

Microservices are the wave of the future for Internet technology, partly because they can be tucked out of the way on the “edges” of the public network. Managing microservices is key to their use.

The Video Screening Room
This conference presentation by James Strachan at Devoxx 2016 in Antwerp, Belgium, does a nice job explaining how to create microservices on Fabric8. Strachan is well-known in the open source world as the creator of Apache Camel and Apache Groovy.

The main point I get from this video is that Fabric8 takes the pain out of cloud development. It just works. No wasted time configuring or troubleshooting web services.
If you’re interested in this topic, others involved with Fabric8 include Claus Ibsen and Roland Hub.
The post Fabric8: An Open Source Microservices Platform appeared first on FOSS Force.


Original URL: http://fossforce.com/2016/12/fabric8-open-source-microservices/

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Microsoft open sources its Azure Container Service Engine and launches deeper Kubernetes integration

 The open source Kubernetes container management project is probably the most popular of the various competing container management services available today. The Cloud Native Compute Foundation, which plays host to the open source side of Kubernetes, is hosting its first Kubernetes conference this week and unsurprisingly, we’ll see quite a bit of container-related news in the next few… Read More


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CoreOS introduces Operators to streamline Kubernetes container management

 CoreOS introduced a new container management concept today known as Operators, which they say will advance the Kubernetes project by offering more automated container management. What’s more, they are open sourcing the technology. “We are introducing the concept of an ‘Operator.’ It’s a concept for taking a lot of the knowledge an engineer [or developer] has inside… Read More


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