Kernel 5.14: 30 Years in the Making and Still Improving

With an ever-increasing interest in more modern hardware support, and a more reliable kernel that is thoroughly tested, contributions by Collabora’s developers continue helping make this a reality for the Linux kernel.
The post Kernel 5.14: 30 Years in the Making and Still Improving appeared first on Linux Today.


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/linuxtoday/linux/~3/-V0p-1zpXFk/

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Paragon’s NTFS3 Driver is About to Become A Part of the Linux Kernel

Paragon’s NTFS3 driver fully supports reads and writes and many other features not found with the existing Linux driver. This new driver is much better off for those needing to deal with Microsoft NTFS file-systems from Linux.
The post Paragon’s NTFS3 Driver is About to Become A Part of the Linux Kernel appeared first on Linux Today.


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/linuxtoday/linux/~3/rU3yik2NB5E/

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Linux 5.12 Kernel Reaches End of Life, Upgrade to Linux Kernel 5.13 Now

Released about three months ago, Linux kernel 5.12 introduced lots of goodies, including support for Playstation 5 DualSense and Nintendo 64 game controllers, eMMC inline encryption support, support for the Lenovo IdeaPad platform profile and the Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Tablet Gen 2, as well as a new memory-debugging tool called KFENCE.
It also introduced initial support for zoned block devices to the Btrfs file system, LTO in Clang support, AMDGPU Freesync HDMI support, and many other cool features, but it’s now marked as EOL (End of Life) on the kernel.org website, which means that it will no longer receive support upstream and that you must upgrade to a newer or LTS kernel as soon as possible.
The post Linux 5.12 Kernel Reaches End of Life, Upgrade to Linux Kernel 5.13 Now appeared first on Linux Today.


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/linuxtoday/linux/~3/kiboPuV7VkM/

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Buffer overruns, license violations, and bad code: FreeBSD 13’s close call

Enlarge / FreeBSD’s core development team, for the most part, does not appear to see the need to update their review and approval procedures. (credit: Aurich Lawson (after KC Green))
At first glance, Matthew Macy seemed like a perfectly reasonable choice to port WireGuard into the FreeBSD kernel. WireGuard is an encrypted point-to-point tunneling protocol, part of what most people think of as a “VPN.” FreeBSD is a Unix-like operating system that powers everything from Cisco and Juniper routers to Netflix’s network stack, and Macy had plenty of experience on its dev team, including work on multiple network drivers.
So when Jim Thompson, the CEO of Netgate, which makes FreeBSD-powered routers, decided it was time for FreeBSD to enjoy the same level of in-kernel WireGuard support that Linux does, he reached out to offer Macy a contract. Macy would port WireGuard into the FreeBSD kernel, where Netgate could then use it


Original URL: https://arstechnica.com/?p=1751073

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