As We Forge the Web of Tomorrow, We Need a Set of Guiding Principles That Can Define the Kind of Web We Want, Says Tim Berners-Lee

Tim Berners-Lee, writing for The New York Times: All technologies come with risks. We drive cars despite the possibility of serious accidents. We take prescription drugs despite the danger of abuse and addiction. We build safeguards into new innovations so we can manage the risks while benefiting from the opportunities. The web is a global platform — its challenges stretch across borders and cultures. Just as the web was built by millions of people collaborating around the world, its future relies on our collective ability to make it a better tool for everyone.

As we forge the web of tomorrow, we need a set of guiding principles that can define the kind of web we want. Identifying these will not be easy — any agreement that covers a diverse group of countries, cultures and interests will never be. But I believe it’s possible to develop a set of basic ideals


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/inXY1_Z-0-o/as-we-forge-the-web-of-tomorrow-we-need-a-set-of-guiding-principles-that-can-define-the-kind-of-web-we-want-says-tim-berners-lee

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The Next Version of HTTP Won’t Be Using TCP

“The HTTP-over-QUIC experimental protocol will be renamed to HTTP/3 and is expected to become the third official version of the HTTP protocol, officials at the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) have revealed,” writes Catalin Cimpanu via ZDNet. “This will become the second Google-developed experimental technology to become an official HTTP protocol upgrade after Google’s SPDY technology became the base of HTTP/2.” From the report: HTTP-over-QUIC is a rewrite of the HTTP protocol that uses Google’s QUIC instead of TCP (Transmission Control Protocol) as its base technology. QUIC stands for “Quick UDP Internet Connections” and is, itself, Google’s attempt at rewriting the TCP protocol as an improved technology that combines HTTP/2, TCP, UDP, and TLS (for encryption), among many other things. Google wants QUIC to slowly replace both TCP and UDP as the new protocol of choice for moving binary data across the Internet, and for good reasons, as test have


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/WQgp3yXb_nE/the-next-version-of-http-wont-be-using-tcp

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Comcast Working on Video Streaming Box for Broadband

Here’s a bit of breaking news about Comcast, the cable and broadband Internet giant. The company is working on a streaming platform for its Internet broadband customers that will deliver an experience similar to its X1 cable service, without the need to subscribe to cable.
The new device will allow customers to utilize apps such as Netflix, Amazon prime and YouTube but it will not have an app store per se. It’s not yet known what the app selection will be.
Interestingly, this is one way Comcast will be able to deliver 4K, HDR and 3D immersive sound to its customers. I can’t say how, but I’ve seen this system in and it is real.
Another aspect of the new platform is that Comcast sees it as a gateway to the connected home and IoT “Internet of Things” connectivity. The demo I witnessed at the headquarters included emulation of one will be like


Original URL: https://www.avsforum.com/comcast-working-video-streaming-box-broadband-customers/

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How to use picture-in-picture mode in Chrome 70

The Chrome web browser was starting to get some bad press after problems with extensions and then concerns over automatic sign-ins. Google listened to the complaints and promised to do something about it — the result is Chrome 70. But Chrome 70 is about more than just security and privacy changes. Google has also used this released to introduce a handful of new features. One of the best is picture-in-picture mode (PiP) which lets you keep watching a video in an overlay while you continue to browse other sites. Here’s how to use it. See also: Chrome 70 introduces more… [Continue Reading]


Original URL: https://betanews.com/2018/10/20/chrome-picture-in-picture/

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Why Microsoft and Google love progressive web apps

Progressive web apps just got real.Though progressive web apps, or PWAs, have been around for about three years — an initiative mostly driven by Google — they got real this week when Google released Chrome 70.[ Further reading: Google’s Chromium browser explained ]The new version of Google’s web browser comes with a robust roster of new features. But the biggest news is new support for PWAs that work with desktop Windows. (Mac and Linux support should appear in Chrome 72.)To read this article in full, please click here


Original URL: https://www.computerworld.com/article/3314746/mobile-apps/why-microsoft-and-google-love-progressive-web-apps.html#tk.rss_all

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Tim Berners-Lee launches open source project Solid to decentralize the web and place users in control of data

Tim Berners-Lee is famous for inventing the world wide web, and now he’s ready to take things to the next level with an ambitious open source project called Solid. Noting that the web has become “an engine of inequity and division”, Berners-Lee wants to restore the power and agency of individuals online and move the balance of power away from “powerful forces who use it for their own agendas”. Solid is not a completely new venture. Berners-Lee has been working on it for some time, and it is built on the existing web as we know it. Where it differs… [Continue Reading]


Original URL: https://betanews.com/2018/09/29/tim-berners-lee-solid/

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Google Wants To Kill the URL

As Chrome looks ahead to its next 10 years, the team is mulling its most controversial initiative yet: fundamentally rethinking URLs across the web. From a report: Uniform Resource Locators are the familiar web addresses you use everyday. They are listed in the web’s DNS address book and direct browsers to the right Internet Protocol addresses that identify and differentiate web servers. In short, you navigate to WIRED.com to read WIRED so you don’t have to manage complicated routing protocols and strings of numbers. But over time, URLs have gotten more and more difficult to read and understand. The resulting opacity has been a boon for cyber criminals who build malicious sites to exploit the confusion. They impersonate legitimate institutions, launch phishing schemes, hawk malicious downloads, and run phony web services — all because it’s difficult for web users to keep track of who they’re dealing with. Now, the Chrome


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/UqYKLRE40_0/google-wants-to-kill-the-url

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Front-End Developer Decries ‘Garbage’ Design Choices on ‘The Bullshit Web’

“Ever wondered why pages seem to load slower and slower? Or why it is that browsing seems to take just as long to load a page, even though your broadband connection doubled in speed a couple of months ago?” gb7djk, a long-time Slashdot reader, blames “the bullshit web” — as described in this essay by Calgary-based front-end developer Nick Heer (who does his testing on a 50 Mbps connection).
A story at the Hill took over nine seconds to load; at Politico, seventeen seconds; at CNN, over thirty seconds. This is the bullshit web… When I use the word “bullshit” in this article, it isn’t in a profane sense. It is much closer to Harry Frankfurt’s definition in On Bullshit: “It is just this lack of connection to a concern with truth — this indifference to how things really are — that I regard as of the essence of bullshit….” The


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/km2PJ9lbK40/front-end-developer-decries-garbage-design-choices-on-the-bullshit-web

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Can We Decentralize the Web?

This week the Internet Archive hosted an amazing Decentralized Web Summit, which united the makers who want to build a web “that’s locked open for good.” [Watch the videos here.] Vint Cerf was there, as was the technical product development leader for Microsoft’s own decentralized identity efforts, several companies building the so-called punk rock Internet, “along with a handful of venture capitalists looking for opportunities.” One talk even included Mike Judge, the creator of HBO’s Silicon Valley, which recently included the decentralized web in its ongoing storyline.

Computing highlighted remarks by Brewster Kahle, the founder of the Internet Archive, and Mitchell Baker, the chairperson of the Mozilla Foundation.
The ideology of the web’s early pioneers, according to Baker, was free software and open source. “Money was considered evil,” she said. So when companies came in to commercialize the internet, the original architects were unprepared. “Advertising is the internet’s original sin,” Kahle


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/bNNYEd24frM/can-we-decentralize-the-web

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