Google Wants To Kill the URL

As Chrome looks ahead to its next 10 years, the team is mulling its most controversial initiative yet: fundamentally rethinking URLs across the web. From a report: Uniform Resource Locators are the familiar web addresses you use everyday. They are listed in the web’s DNS address book and direct browsers to the right Internet Protocol addresses that identify and differentiate web servers. In short, you navigate to WIRED.com to read WIRED so you don’t have to manage complicated routing protocols and strings of numbers. But over time, URLs have gotten more and more difficult to read and understand. The resulting opacity has been a boon for cyber criminals who build malicious sites to exploit the confusion. They impersonate legitimate institutions, launch phishing schemes, hawk malicious downloads, and run phony web services — all because it’s difficult for web users to keep track of who they’re dealing with. Now, the Chrome


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/UqYKLRE40_0/google-wants-to-kill-the-url

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Front-End Developer Decries ‘Garbage’ Design Choices on ‘The Bullshit Web’

“Ever wondered why pages seem to load slower and slower? Or why it is that browsing seems to take just as long to load a page, even though your broadband connection doubled in speed a couple of months ago?” gb7djk, a long-time Slashdot reader, blames “the bullshit web” — as described in this essay by Calgary-based front-end developer Nick Heer (who does his testing on a 50 Mbps connection).
A story at the Hill took over nine seconds to load; at Politico, seventeen seconds; at CNN, over thirty seconds. This is the bullshit web… When I use the word “bullshit” in this article, it isn’t in a profane sense. It is much closer to Harry Frankfurt’s definition in On Bullshit: “It is just this lack of connection to a concern with truth — this indifference to how things really are — that I regard as of the essence of bullshit….” The


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/km2PJ9lbK40/front-end-developer-decries-garbage-design-choices-on-the-bullshit-web

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Can We Decentralize the Web?

This week the Internet Archive hosted an amazing Decentralized Web Summit, which united the makers who want to build a web “that’s locked open for good.” [Watch the videos here.] Vint Cerf was there, as was the technical product development leader for Microsoft’s own decentralized identity efforts, several companies building the so-called punk rock Internet, “along with a handful of venture capitalists looking for opportunities.” One talk even included Mike Judge, the creator of HBO’s Silicon Valley, which recently included the decentralized web in its ongoing storyline.

Computing highlighted remarks by Brewster Kahle, the founder of the Internet Archive, and Mitchell Baker, the chairperson of the Mozilla Foundation.
The ideology of the web’s early pioneers, according to Baker, was free software and open source. “Money was considered evil,” she said. So when companies came in to commercialize the internet, the original architects were unprepared. “Advertising is the internet’s original sin,” Kahle


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/bNNYEd24frM/can-we-decentralize-the-web

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Google updates Android Messages so you can send texts from the web

Google is rolling out a series of changes to Android Messages, one of which makes it possible to send text messages from the comfort of your computer. Called “Messages for web” the feature enables users to use a desktop web browser to send SMSes rather than their phone. While this is almost certainly the biggest and most exciting changes for Messages, Google is also pushing a number of other new features to the app, including Smart Replies, GIF search and link previews. See also: Google enters ‘strategic partnership’ with China’s JD.com Android emulator Andy OS seems to be secretly installing… [Continue Reading]


Original URL: https://betanews.com/2018/06/19/messages-for-web/

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4.9% of Websites Use Flash, Down From 28.5% in 2011

Web makers continue to ditch the infamous Flash for other safer, improved technologies. In 2011, more than 28.5 percent of websites used Flash in their code, a figure technology survey site W3Techs estimates to have dropped to 4.9 percent today. BleepingComputer: The number confirms Flash’s decline, and a reason why Adobe has decided to retire the technology at the end of 2020. A decline from 28.5 percent to 4.9 percent doesn’t look that bad, but we’re talking about all Internet sites, not just a small portion of Top 10,000 or Top 1 Million sites. Taking into account the sheer number of abandoned sites on today’s Internet, the decline is quite considerable, and W3Techs’ findings confirm similar statistics put out by a Google security engineer in February.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/8Wo3VBP-DaI/49-of-websites-use-flash-down-from-285-in-2011

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IETF Approves TLS 1.3 As Internet Standard

An anonymous reader writes: The Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF), the organization that approves proposed Internet standards and protocols, has formally approved TLS 1.3 as the next major version of the Transport Layer Security (TLS) protocol. The decision comes after four years of discussions and 28 protocol drafts, with the 28th being selected as the final version. TLS 1.3 is now expected to become the standard method in which a client and server establish an encrypted communications channel across the Internet — aka HTTPS connections. The protocol has several advantages over its previous version — TLS 1.2. The biggest feature is that TLS 1.3 ditches older encryption and hashing algorithms (such as MD5 and SHA-224) for newer and harder to crack alternatives (such as ChaCha20, Poly1305, Ed25519, x25519, and x448). Second, TLS 1.3 is also much faster at negotiating the initial handshake between the client and the server, reducing the


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/sneQuvd--ao/ietf-approves-tls-13-as-internet-standard

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WordPress Now Powers 30% of Websites

WordPress now powers 30 percent of the web, according to data from web technology survey firm W3Techs. From a report: This represents a 5 percentage point increase in nearly two and a half years, after WordPress hit the 25 percent mark in November 2015. It’s worth noting here that this figure relates to the entire Web, regardless of whether a website uses a content management system (CMS) or not. If we’re looking at market share, WordPress actually claims 60.2 percent, up from 58.7 percent in November 2015. By comparison, its nearest CMS rival, Joomla, has seen its usage jump from 2.8 percent to 3.1 percent, while Drupal is up from 2.1 percent to 2.2 percent.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/ICWnz26bF0o/wordpress-now-powers-30-of-websites

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Think you know web browsers? Take this quiz and prove it.

Test Your KnowledgeImage by Google / Christina Tynan WoodPity the poor web browser. Once the undisputed heavyweight champion of Internet applications, it’s been largely supplanted now by monolithic social media platforms, mobile technologies, and smartphone apps.To read this article in full, please click here


Original URL: https://www.computerworld.com/article/3247668/internet/think-you-know-web-browsers-take-this-quiz-and-prove-it.html#tk.rss_all

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WordPress users advised to update to version 4.8.3 following discovery of SQL injection vulnerability

Anyone running a website powered by WordPress is being told to upgrade to version 4.8.3 immediately after the discovery of a serious security issue. The problem — an SQL injection vulnerability — affects millions of websites running WordPress 4.8.2 and older. In addition to installing the latest update, site owners are advised to update plugins that could be exploited. The vulnerability was discovered by Anthony Ferrara from Lingo Live who broke the news by saying: “Before reading further, if you haven’t updated yet stop right now and update.” The SQL injection bug was supposedly fixed by WordPress 4.8.2 last month,… [Continue Reading]


Original URL: https://betanews.com/2017/11/02/wordpress-sql-injection-vulnerability/

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