Visualize a COBOL application with interactive callgraphs

Enterprise applications are made up of so many pieces that even if each piece is very simple, the end-to-end flow can quickly become complicated. Then there are additional levels on top of the execution flow, like the data model — what data is being used, where is it updated, where is it changed, etc. Enterprise applications aren’t for the faint of heart. Luckily, you can apply technology to these complicated solutions to make them easier for developers to understand, and thus maintain.
This tutorial will introduce you to this type of technology using a sample COBOL application. Using a virtual lab environment, you will use IBM Application Discovery and Delivery Intelligence to generate diagrams of the sample application. You will even be able to interact with these diagrams after they are generated so you can see just the right amount of detail to quickly understand how the pieces of the sample


Original URL: https://developer.ibm.com/tutorials/easy-cobol-code-insights/

Original article

Use COBOL to parse JSON

This simple COBOL application demonstrates how to parse JSON using IBM Enterprise COBOL. It is written to work in a standalone fashion so it can run without any input files. The JSON string is declared in memory, as are the results from the parse, and everything is printed out for clarity.
The first JSON text that you will need to parse contains information about the client and is defined in working storage as jtxt-1047-client-data.
It looks like this:

The second JSON text that you’ll use contains transaction data stored in a JSON array. You’ll define it in working storage as jtxt-1047-transactions.
It looks like this:

Prerequisites
z/OS system access
IBM Enterprise COBOL
Estimated time
It should take about 30 minutes to complete this tutorial.
Steps
1. Copy the supplied files to your z/OS system
Copy files in this GitHub repo to your z/OS system. There are several ways to transfer the files: You could do this directly to z/OS using a Git


Original URL: https://developer.ibm.com/tutorials/parse-json-using-ibm-enterprise-cobol/

Original article

Create an Nginx reverse proxy across multiple backend servers

So you’ve got an application running in IBM Cloud. It’s made up of two components — each a Docker container, each listening on a given port and IP address. These components might be a backend that talks to a database, and a frontend that serves a website and talks to the backend. They could run on the same virtual server, or you might want to split them across different instances.
Either way, you may want these two components to appear as though they’re coming from the same endpoint, and have something route the traffic for you in a clever way. For example, you could route traffic calling any /api/ endpoint to the backend component, and any other traffic to the frontend component. It’s easy to do this using a reverse proxy like Nginx, and this tutorial shows you how.

Even easier, you’ll run it in IBM Cloud as a Cloud Foundry application.


Original URL: https://developer.ibm.com/tutorials/develop-a-website-with-different-frontend-and-api-backend-endpoints/

Original article

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