Trump tweet gets it wrong on net neutrality ruling

President Trump this morning randomly addressed a recent court ruling on net neutrality, calling it a “great win” that will “lead to many big things including 5G.” Perhaps he didn’t read the ruling closely, because it in fact is an enormous blow to the FCC and the “unhinged” logic on which it based the rollback of net neutrality.
You can find a full analysis of the decision here, but Trump’s tweet ought to be addressed directly, because it is wrong in several ways.

We just WON the big court case on Net Neutrality Rules! A great win for the future and speed of the internet. Will lead to many big things including 5G. Congratulations to the FCC and its Chairman, Ajit Pai!
— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) October 7, 2019

First and most important, the FCC didn’t win this. Certainly it was a partial victory in that it wasn’t struck down and many of


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Government Shutdown: TLS Certificates Not Renewed, Many Websites Are Down

More than 80 TLS certificates used by US government websites have expired so far without being renewed, leaving some websites inaccessible to the public. From a report: NASA, the US Department of Justice, and the Court of Appeals are just some of the US government agencies currently impacted, according to Netcraft. The blame falls on the current US federal government shutdown caused by US President Donald Trump’s refusal to sign any 2019 government budget bill that doesn’t contain funding for a Mexico border wall he promised during his election campaign. This has resulted in hundreds of thousands of government workers being furloughed across all government agencies, including staff handling IT support and cybersecurity. As a result, government websites are dropping like flies, with no one being on hand to renew TLS certificates.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


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Washington DC Made GitHub Its Official Digital Source For Laws

“Recently, I found a typo in the District of Columbia’s legal code and corrected it using GitHub,” writes D.C. based “civic hacker” Joshua Tauberer, adding “My feat highlights the groundbreaking way the District manages its legal code.”
The District does something with its legal code that no other jurisdiction in the world does (to my knowledge): it publishes the law on GitHub…. This isn’t a copy of the DC law. It is an authoritative source. It is where the DC Council stores the digital versions of enacted laws, and this source feeds directly into the Council’s DC Code website…. This is a milestone in the advancement of open government and open legal publishing.
No one should expect that editing the law on GitHub is going to become the new normal, however. My edit wasnâ(TM)t substantive. This sort of “technical correction,” as lawyers would call it, didnâ(TM)t need to be passed


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A Swedish ISP has blocked Elsevier’s website in protest for forcing it to block Sci-Hub

Bahnhof’s page blocking access to Sci-Hub. (Screenshot: TechCrunch)
A little known fact about Swedes: when they get angry, they will often scribble down a note on paper — sometimes anonymously — and leave it where it will be seen, rather than confront a person face-to-face.
One extremely angry Swedish pro-freedom internet provider took that passive aggression to a whole new level.
On Thursday, Stockholm-based Bahnhof was ordered by a Swedish copyright court to block Sci-Hub, a pirate site dedicated to free access to academic papers and research. The site, operated by a Kazakh student Alexandra Elbakyan, has faced court orders and threats of site blocks across Europe, following lawsuits from academic publishers like Elsevier, which brought the most recent case.
Bahnhof was forced to block 20 domains associated with Sci-Hub, according to the company’s response to the court order.
Resigned to the fact that it was unlikely to win an appeal, the internet provider called


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FCC To Officially Rescind Net Neutrality Rules On Thursday

An anonymous reader quotes a report from Reuters: The U.S. Federal Communications Commission is expected to publish on Thursday its December order overturning the landmark Obama-era net neutrality rules, two sources briefed on the matter said Tuesday. The formal publication in the Federal Register, a government website, means state attorneys general and advocacy groups will be able to sue in a bid to block the order from taking effect. The Republican-led FCC in December voted 3-2 to overturn rules barring service providers from blocking, slowing access to or charging more for certain content. The White House Office of Management and Budget still must sign off on some aspects of the FCC reversal before it takes legal effect. Congressional aides say the publication will trigger a 60-legislative-day deadline for Congress to vote on whether to overturn the decision. U.S. Senate Democrats said in January they had the backing of 50 members


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US launches website to share open-source software code

The US government has just launched its latest website, Code.gov with the aim of preventing the replication of code across government agencies in order to conserve valuable time and resources. The site, which was launched on Thursday, already contains almost 50 open-source projects from a number of government agencies. Code.gov is the product of the Federal Source Code policy that was first announced in August by the White House. The site’s goal is to provide new custom source code that can be reused across government agencies to cut down on replicating code which is a waste of government expenses and… [Continue Reading]


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The U.S. names its first chief information security officer

 A former Air Force general and Department of Homeland Security official has been appointed as the first federal chief information security officer, the White House announced today.
Gregory Touhill will take charge of cybersecurity across the federal government, planning and implementing policy changes to make the nation’s critical infrastructure and government agencies more secure. Read More


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Transfer of Internet Governance Will Go Ahead On Oct. 1

An anonymous reader writes from a report via Computerworld: The U.S. says it will proceed with its plan to hand over oversight of the internet’s domain name system functions to a multistakeholder body on Oct. 1. Computerworld reports: “The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), under contract with the U.S. Department of Commerce, operates the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA) which enables the operation of the internet domain name system (DNS). These include responsibility for the coordination of the DNS root, IP addressing and other internet protocol resources. The National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA), an agency within the Commerce Department, said in March 2014 that it planned to let its contract with ICANN expire on Sept. 30, 2015, passing the oversight of the functions to a global governance model. NTIA made it clear that it would not accept a plan from internet stakeholders that would replace its


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