Microsoft acquires TakeLessons, an online and in-person tutoring platform, to ramp up its edtech play

Microsoft said in January this year that Teams, its online collaboration platform, was being used by over 100 million students — boosted in no small part by the COVID-19 pandemic and many schools going partly or fully remote. Now, it’s made another acquisition to continue expanding its position in the education market.
The company has acquired TakeLessons, a platform for students to connect with individual tutors in areas like music lessons, language learning, academic subjects and professional training or hobbies, and for tutors to book and organize the lessons they give, both online and in person.
Terms of the deal have not been disclosed but we are trying to find out. San Diego-based TakeLessons had raised at least $20 million from a range of VCs and individuals that included LightBank, Uncork Capital, Crosslink Capital and others. TakeLessons posted a short note in the form of a Q&A confirming the deal on its


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Techcrunch/~3/pxdmavn1M1o/

Original article

10 Video Games for Newbies Who Always Wanted to Become Gamers

Video games offer a wide range of genres and gameplay styles, and there’s probably a game out there for everyone. But despite the variety of experiences, jumping into console or PC gaming can be daunting, especially if you didn’t grow up playing games. Luckily, there are plenty of great video games out there for…Read more…


Original URL: https://lifehacker.com/10-video-games-for-newbies-who-always-wanted-to-become-1847262076

Original article

Google Open-Sources Fully Homomorphic Encryption (FHE) Toolkit

Google has open-sourced a collection of C++ libraries for implementing Fully Homomorphic Encryption (FHE) in modern applications. From a report: Fully homomorphic encryption, or simply homomorphic encryption, is a form of data encryption that allows users/applications to perform mathematical computations on encrypted data without decrypting it first, keeping the data’s privacy intact. While the concept of homomorphic encryption has been around since 1978, when it was first described at a theoretical level, and 2009, when it was first implemented in practice, it has not been broadly adopted in software due to its complexity, advanced cryptography techniques, and lack of open-source code and public documentation. However, despite this, today, FHE is a hot technology in software design.

FHE allows software vendors to work on encrypted data without sharing the encryption/decryption keys with untrustworthy systems such as client-side apps or publicly-hosted web servers, where the keys could be stolen or intercepted by


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/4oCMsjLDP_k/google-open-sources-fully-homomorphic-encryption-fhe-toolkit

Original article

Google abandons URL shortening in Chrome

Google has called quits on the notion of truncating URLs in Chrome, according to a note from earlier this month in the Chromium project’s bug database.”This experiment didn’t move relevant security metrics, so we’re not going to launch it,” Emily Stark, a staff software engineer on the Chrome team, wrote in the June 7 entry.Android Police first reported on Stark’s note June 10.To read this article in full, please click here


Original URL: https://www.computerworld.com/article/3621640/google-abandons-url-shortening-in-chrome.html#tk.rss_all

Original article

Google opens Workspace to everyone

Google today announced that it is making Workspace, the service formerly known as G Suite (and with a number of new capabilities), available to everyone, including consumers on free Google accounts. The core philosophy behind Workspace is to enable deeper collaboration between users. You can think of it as the same Google productivity apps you’re already familiar with (Gmail, Calendar, Drive, Docs, Sheets, Slides, Meet, Chat, etc.), but with a new wrapper around it and deeper integrations between the different apps.
For individual users who want more from their Workspace, there will also be a new paid offering, though Google isn’t saying how much you’ll have to pay yet. With that, users will get access to “premium capabilities, including smart booking services, professional video meetings and personalized email marketing, with much more on the way.” We’ll likely hear more about this later this year. This new paid offering will be available


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Techcrunch/~3/1hzW349CwpY/

Original article

Google Rekindles Interest in RSS

Chrome, at least in its experimental Canary version on Android (and only for users in the U.S.), is getting an interesting update in the coming weeks that brings back RSS, the once-popular format for getting updates from all the sites you love in Google Reader and similar services. From a report: In Chrome, users will soon see a ‘Follow’ feature for sites that support RSS and the browser’s New Tab page will get what is essentially a (very) basic RSS reader — I guess you could almost call it a “Google Reader.” Now we’re not talking about a full-blown RSS reader here. The New Tab page will show you updates from the sites you follow in chronological order, but it doesn’t look like you can easily switch between feeds, for example. It’s a start, though.

“Today, people have many ways to keep up with their favorite websites, including subscribing to


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/BhpyhRzG4gY/google-rekindles-interest-in-rss

Original article

Google interconnects its Workspace apps, adds a dozen new features

Google kicked off its Google I/O Developer event this afternoon with a set of new collaborative workspace tools, which it’s calling, as a group, “Smart Canvas.” The company demonstrated using how Smart Canvas works for brainstorming and project planning, showing how users could drop in ideas about an upcoming launch, share their thoughts, work on documents together, join Google Meet calls and solve problems together.
The company says it’s enhancing its everyday collaborative documents, like Google Docs, Sheets and Slides, with a dozen some new features, as a part of its effort in the Smart Canvas new product experience.
Currently, when users @mention others in a document, a smart chip will pop up, displaying that person’s location, job title and contact information. Smart chips will also now appear for recommended files and meetings in Docs, and will soon roll out to Sheets. This will make it easier for collaboratives to scan the


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Techcrunch/~3/ZEIXhEsAdZI/

Original article

Google’s FeedBurner Moves To a New Infrastructure But Loses Its Email Subscription Service

Google today announced that it is moving FeedBurner to a new infrastructure but also deprecating its email subscription service. From a report: If you’re an internet user of a certain age, chances are you used Google’s FeedBurner to manage the RSS feeds of your personal blogs and early podcasts at some point. During the Web 2.0 era, it was the de facto standard for feed management and analytics, after all. Founded in 2004, with Dick Costolo as one of its co-founders (before he became Twitter’s CEO in 2010), it was acquired by Google in 2007. Ever since, FeedBurner lingered in an odd kind of limbo. While Google had no qualms shutting down popular services like Google Reader in favor of its ill-fated social experiments like Google+, FeedBurner just kept burning feeds day in and day out, even as Google slowly deprecated some parts of the service, most notably its advertising


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/kCv5aqWejjs/googles-feedburner-moves-to-a-new-infrastructure-but-loses-its-email-subscription-service

Original article

In 2020, Two Thirds of Google Searches Ended Without a Click

AmiMoJo shares a report: In August of 2019, I published research from now-defunct clickstream data provider, Jumpshot, showing that 50.33% of all Google searches ended without a click to any web property in the results. Today, thanks to new data from SimilarWeb, I’ve got a substantive update to that analysis. From January to December, 2020, 64.82% of searches on Google (desktop and mobile combined) ended in the search results without clicking to another web property. That number is likely undercounting some mobile and nearly all voice searches, and thus it’s probable that more than 2/3rds of all Google searches are what I’ve been calling “zero-click searches.” Some folks have pointed out that “zero-click” is slightly misleading terminology, as a search ending with a click within the Google SERP itself (for example, clicking on the animal sounds here or clicking a phone number to dial a local business in the maps


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/bRVsY4-clzM/in-2020-two-thirds-of-google-searches-ended-without-a-click

Original article

Proudly powered by WordPress | Theme: Baskerville 2 by Anders Noren.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: