Rejoin us at TeleRead.org: The .com version is now just an archive

Cross-posted
TeleRead.com, the web’s oldest site devoted to general-interest news and views on ebooks and related matters, has just moved back to TeleRead.org.
Please rejoin all of us there if you haven’t already: Editor Chris Meadows (photo), Associate Editor Paul StJohn Mackintosh, Senior Writer Joanna Cabot, Contributing Writer Susan Lulgjuraj, and me. A former poverty beat reporter in an Ohio steel town, I founded TeleRead two decades ago to advocate well-stocked national digital libraries for all, and today I’m publisher.
In keeping with the .org, we’ll stand up for the commonweal and write on topics dear to us and our long-time community members. We won’t worry so much about pleasing Google and other SEO-related dieties. Hosted at WordPress.com, the new site will cost a fraction of what the .com version did. So no need to chase after ads right now.
TeleRead.com will remain online briefly as a locked-up WordPress site, then as static HTML.
Links


Original URL: http://teleread.com/rejoin-us-teleread-org-havent-already/

Original article

Is it time for me to ditch Calibre?

I have been a long-time fan of the Calibre e-book library software. I use it often to organize and categorize my books. But many of the functions which first drew me to Calibre have become a tad obsolete as the Cloud-based infrastructure has developed. For example, I no longer plug any devices into the computer—I side-load books onto my Kindle-equipped devices via the Cloud. So, do I still need Calibre?
I was thinking about this again as the Beloved has been pondering a new computer purchase. He has been making do on my ancient Macbook since his needs are minimal. but it’s on its last legs. So he’s thinking of taking over the HP laptop I have, which is almost new, but has proved a bit too bulky and cumbersome for me. What he’d like to do is set it up as some sort of family media hub—he can do his


Original URL: http://teleread.com/is-it-time-for-me-to-ditch-calibre/

Original article

How to edit ePub files manually: A handy overview

Here’s a handy overview of the basics of manually editing ePub, the industry standard format for e-books—courtesy of Kotobee.
Yes, sometimes Calibre, Scrivener and the like are enough for creating e-books, especially for your personal use or very limited distribution. But what if you care about the details and know the readers will, too?
Even the people at Kotobee, the developers of Kotobee Author, admit that only so much can be automated.
It’s a huge failing of ePub—the fact it’s been around for years and you may still need to resort to manual editing, even for a simple book, unless you want to use a commercial service.
Why can’t the industry get this right? And now the International Digital Publishing Forum—the group behind ePub—may merge with the World Wide Web Consortium and team up on new standards for other reasons. Let’s hope that this time the standards people are more helpful to publishers of all sizes and early on can develop


Original URL: http://teleread.com/how-to-edit-epub-files-manually-when-calibre-scrivener-and-the-like-arent-enough/

Original article

Scholarly Open Access Publishers: Beware the bad apples

Many, myself included, have embraced scholarly open access publishing as an antidote to the ills and exploitative practices of mainstream academic, scientific, and scholarly publishing. However, not all scholarly open access publishing is necessarily good. And one academic librarian, Jeffrey Beall, librarian at Auraria Library in the University of Colorado Denver, makes it his business to track down bad scholarly open access publishers, and spread the word about their wrong-doings.
Beall’s List of “Potential, possible, or probable predatory scholarly open-access publishers” is one of the best early warning systems around for “questionable, scholarly open-access publishers.” The list is also depressingly huge, and is kept regularly updated, the last update being just the day before writing.
The criteria for inclusion in Beall’s List are exhaustive, and include such obvious scams as “an optional ‘fast-track’ fee-based service for expedited peer review which appears to provide assured publication with little or no vetting,” or a


Original URL: http://teleread.com/scholarly-open-access-publishers-beware-bad-apples/

Original article

Amazon Fire updates to Fire OS 5.1.4 – many changes?

While I was busy at the Brain Bar Budapest conference over the weekend, my Amazon Fire tablet quietly updated itself to Fire OS 5.1.4. But does the new OS bring many changes? And has it upset anything?
Full details of the new update are available at the Fire (5th Generation) Software Updates page. There’s only two major changes listed, On Deck. which “downloads Amazon Videos to your Fire tablet so you have something to watch even when you are offline,” and the new feature that allows you to “Download Books and Periodicals to Your SD Card.” I haven’t had a chance to try either yet, but reports in The eBook Reader and elsewhere indicate that they work just fine.
As TeleRead readers should know by now, I hacked my Fire way back to install the Google Play Store and the usual run of Google apps on the tablet. The Google Play Store itself and all


Original URL: http://teleread.com/amazon-fire-updates-fire-os-5-1-4-many-changes/

Original article

Per AP Stylebook, ‘Internet’ officially loses its capital letter today

internetWelcome to the first day of a lower-cased internet. At least, that’s what we’ll have if the AP Stylebook has its way. As I’ve mentioned before, the new edition no longer capitalizes “Internet,” and that edition hits the street today. The AP has a reasonable justification for its new lower-cased stance:

“The argument for lowercasing Internet is that it has become wholly generic, like electricity and the telephone. It never was trademarked and is not based on any proper noun,” Tom Kent, AP Standards Editor, said in a statement. “The best reason for capitalizing it in the past may have been that the term was new. At one point, we understand, ‘Phonograph’ was capitalized.”

I personally still plan to continue capitalizing “Internet,” at least for a while, simply because that’s how I learned the word. It’s not just any old internet, which is what we call a network that connects multiple computer networks together. It’s the Internet. The big enchilada. I suppose I still have more in common with my father, who still yells at the TV when newscasters split infinitives, than I might have expected.

(Found via Slashdot.)

The post Per AP Stylebook, ‘Internet’ officially loses its capital letter today appeared first on TeleRead News: E-books, publishing, tech and beyond.


Original URL: http://teleread.com/per-ap-stylebook-internet-officially-loses-its-capital-letter-today/

Original article

EU to set publicly funded research free for open access

european-union-flag-1-300x238-300x238The European Union has decided that “all scientific articles in Europe must be freely accessible as of 2020,” because “EU member states want to achieve optimal reuse of research data.” This marks a wholesale defeat for the various claims and rationales of the scientific publishers who have sought to keep publicly funded scientific research behind their paywalls.

According to the statement on the website for the Netherlands EU Presidency for 2016, “open access means that scientific publications on the results of research supported by public and public-private funds must be freely accessible to everyone. That is not yet the case. The results of publicly funded research are currently not accessible to people outside universities and knowledge institutions. As a result, teachers, doctors and entrepreneurs do not have access to the latest scientific insights that are so relevant to their work, and universities have to take out expensive subscriptions with publishers to gain access to publications.”

The announcement does state that in certain instances intellectual property rights will override the basic obligation for free access. But it’s clear that overall the thrust of the legislation is directed particularly at the high rates and access restrictions championed by the academic publishing industry. It’s also very clear that the industry’s moves to address these concerns haven’t gone anything like far enough to satisfy the EU.

What makes the EU”s argument especially damning for the defenders of restricted access in scientific and academic publishing is that it explicitly links economic and technological progress, and even employment and social stability, across the whole of Europe to open access. The Competitiveness Council of the EU was responsible for the decision. Netherlands State Secretary for Education, Culture and Science Sander Dekker, who led the process, said that: “Research and innovation generate economic growth and more jobs and provide solutions to societal challenges. And that means a stronger Europe. To achieve that, Europe must be as attractive as possible for researchers and start-ups to locate here and for companies to invest. That calls for knowledge to be freely shared. The time for talking about open access is now past. With these agreements, we are going to achieve it in practice.”

The EU plan may not end the run for pro-open access initiatives like Sci-Hub, but it certainly puts a big cramp in the arguments of their opponents. But with the likes of Joseph E. Stiglitz arguing for open access, it’s no surprise that the EU finally decided to follow their arguments and do something. I’ll be watching Reed Elsevier’s stock price with great interest over the next few days.

The post EU to set publicly funded research free for open access appeared first on TeleRead News: E-books, publishing, tech and beyond.


Original URL: http://teleread.com/eu-set-publicly-funded-research-free-public-access/

Original article

Raspberry Pi 3 official Android support could bring cheap big-screen e-reading

raspberry-pi-3-640x427.jpgFans of the Raspberry Pi 3, that delightful little mini-computer that Chris Meadows has written up so affectionately, will be heartened to hear that Android is now making The Fruity Little Computy That Could into an officially supported Android device. The Android Open Source Project (AOSP) has now created a repository (so far empty) for the Raspberry Pi 3. As written up in Android Police and elsewhere, this could mean a full-blown Android OS iteration for the mini PC. Or it could simply mean support for linking Android devices. With no indication when any code will actually debut, so far we don’t know.

If we do get a full version of Android running on the Pi 3, though, that could be interesting. Right now I’m running a version of the Chromium OS on my Pi 2, which basically converts my Raspberry into a mini Chromebox. And now we have talk of Android/Chrome convergence with the Google Play Store opening up to support Chrome devices. It’s not hard to anticipate that all your favorite ebook reading apps for Android and Chrome might soon be running on a Raspberry for big-screen display in home or classroom alike.

The post Raspberry Pi 3 official Android support could bring cheap big-screen e-reading appeared first on TeleRead News: E-books, publishing, tech and beyond.


Original URL: http://teleread.com/raspberry-pi-3-official-android-support-bring-cheap-big-screen-e-reading/

Original article

Might your next e-reader come from a Circuit City?

circuit-cityToday someone on my Facebook shared the homepage of the old Circuit City retail chain, with an announcement that it’s coming back to life under new ownership. Long-time readers may remember that Circuit City short-circuited in 2009 as an end result of making several terrible corporate decisions, not unlike Blockbuster and Borders a short while later—an ignominious end to 60 years in the electronic retail business.

A quick bit of research popped up a bunch of stories from January and February indicating that the iconic brand name has passed through several hands and is now being resurrected by a couple of retail-industry veterans. The chain will open a Dallas, Texas store in June, and  hopes to open 50 to 100 stores by next year. The plan is not to try to go big-box, like the old Circuit City, but to operate on a smaller boutique scale, selling tablets, headphones, drones, 3D printers, computer accessories, and other millennial geek fodder—not unlike Radio Shack, which has had problems of its own.

The store will reportedly feature touchscreen terminals to let shoppers browse through inventory, which is kind of interesting. In a way that, plus the boutique nature of it, puts me in mind of Amazon’s own bookstore experiments, which are effectively boutique bookstores that tie into the Amazon.com experience. It’s unclear exactly how these tablets will work. Will the new Circuit City simply store its inventory in a back room and bring it out when someone places a touchscreen order, using the space more efficiently than the usual stock-everything-on-the-floor retail mode?

It seems a bit odd that Circuit City would expect people to come to its store to shop on a touchscreen when they can already shop on the web from home or their tablets just fine. So maybe there’s some aspect of it I’m just not seeing yet. In any event, it’s amusing to consider the recursion and inversion of shopping for a tablet from a tablet—located in a retail store.

In any event, I bought my first Clié from a Circuit City, so I’m well acquainted with the idea of buying e-readers from such a location. But is there room in the current Amazon-dominated retail environment for a new boutique electronics store, even one with a recognizable and formerly-respected brand name—especially when the closest existing chain, Radio Shack, is on the ropes and soon expected to go the way of the original Circuit City? Well, maybe—if it can do things sufficiently differently from the way any of the current brick-and-mortar retail chains do it, and that different way works.

The post Might your next e-reader come from a Circuit City? appeared first on TeleRead News: E-books, publishing, tech and beyond.


Original URL: http://teleread.com/might-your-next-e-reader-come-from-a-circuit-city/

Original article

Proudly powered by WordPress | Theme: Baskerville 2 by Anders Noren.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: