Firefox 63 blocks tracking cookies, offers a VPN when you need one

Firefox 63, out today, includes the first iteration of what Mozilla is calling Enhanced Tracking Protection (ETP), a feature to improve privacy and stop your activity across the Web from being tracked.
Tracking cookies store some kind of unique identifier that represents your browser. The cookie is tied to a third-party domain—the domain of the tracking company, rather than the site you’re visiting. Each site you visit that embeds the tracking cookie will allow the tracking company to see the sites you visit and, using that unique identifier, cross-reference different visits to different sites to build a picture of your online behavior.

The new option to block third-party tracking cookies but permit other third-party cookies. (credit: Mozilla)

Firefox has long had the ability to block all third-party cookies, but this is a crude solution, and many sites will break if all third-party cookies are prohibited. The new EPT option works as a more


Original URL: https://arstechnica.com/?p=1398617

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Firefox Removes Core Product Support For RSS/Atom Feeds

Starting with Firefox 64, RSS/Atom feed support will be handled via add-ons, rather than in-product. Mozilla’s Gijs Kruitbosch writes: After considering the maintenance, performance and security costs of the feed preview and subscription features in Firefox, we’ve concluded that it is no longer sustainable to keep feed support in the core of the product. While we still believe in RSS and support the goals of open, interoperable formats on the Web, we strongly believe that the best way to meet the needs of RSS and its users is via WebExtensions. With that in mind, we have decided to remove the built-in feed preview feature, subscription UI, and the “live bookmarks” support from the core of Firefox, now that improved replacements for those features are available via add-ons. By virtue of being baked into the core of Firefox, these features have long had outsized maintenance and security costs relative to their


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/H413NCXp-PI/firefox-removes-core-product-support-for-rssatom-feeds

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Tor Browser Gets a Redesign, Switches To New Firefox Quantum Engine

The Tor Browser has rolled out a new interface with the release of v8. From a report: The Tor Browser has always been based on the Firefox codebase, but it lagged behind a few releases. Mozilla rolled out a major overhaul of the Firefox codebase in November 2017, with the release of Firefox 57, the first release in the Firefox Quantum series. Firefox Quantum came with a new page rendering engine, a new add-ons API, and a new user interface called the Photon UI. Because these were major, code-breaking changes, it took the smaller Tor team some time to integrate all of them into the Tor Browser codebase and make sure everything worked as intended. The new Tor Browser 8, released yesterday, is now in sync with the most recent version of Firefox, the Quantum release, and also supports all of its features. This means the Tor Browser now uses


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/FduTNhu3aYQ/tor-browser-gets-a-redesign-switches-to-new-firefox-quantum-engine

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Firefox 61 Arrives With Better Search, Tab Warming, and Accessibility Tools Inspector

On Tuesday, Mozilla released Firefox 61, the newest version of its web browser for Windows, Mac, Linux, and Android platforms. The release builds on Firefox Quantum, which the company calls “by far the biggest update since Firefox 1.0 in 2004.” VentureBeat: Version 61 brings TLS 1.3, the ability to add custom search engines to the location bar, tab warming, retained display lists, WebExtension tab management, and the Accessibility Tools Inspector. Mozilla doesn’t break out the exact numbers for Firefox, though the company does say “half a billion people around the world” use the browser. In other words, it’s a major platform that web developers have to consider.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/EQwl_vOHtp8/firefox-61-arrives-with-better-search-tab-warming-and-accessibility-tools-inspector

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Firefox gets speedier tab switching, a new accessibility tool for developers and more

Mozilla today released version 61 of its Firefox browser. By now, it’s no secret that Firefox is back in contention as a serious competitor to Google’s Chrome browser and while the new release doesn’t offer any groundbreaking new features, all of the new improvements and tools in Firefox 61 are good examples for why Firefox is worth another try.
Two of the new features focus on speed, something Firefox was sorely lacking for a while but now offers plenty of.
The first of these is tab warming, which essentially makes switching between tabs faster because Firefox already preemptively starts loading a tab (after a small delay) when you are hovering over it. Once you do click on that tab, much of the rendering has already been done, so switching between tabs now feels faster.
The other new performance-related feature is ‘retained display lists.’ Whenever Firefox renders a page, it builds a display list


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Techcrunch/~3/vxX-xfst7Jk/

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Firefox aims to win back Chrome users with its souped up Quantum browser

 The last half-decade hasn’t been great for Firefox marketshare. Chrome first overtook Mozilla’s browser back in late-2011 and now hovers above 60-percent, according to StatCounter numbers. But after a fair amount of struggles, Mozilla’s been undergoing an interesting sort of renaissance of late, and is banking on its new Quantum browser to bring bygone users back into the… Read More


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Techcrunch/~3/cX2xwqTbVtw/

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After 12 Years, Mozilla Kills ‘Firebug’ Dev Tool

An anonymous reader quotes InfoWorld:

The Firebug web development tool, an open source add-on to the Firefox browser, is being discontinued after 12 years, replaced by Firefox Developer Tools. Firebug will be dropped with next month’s release of Firefox Quantum (version 57). The Firebug tool lets developers inspect, edit, and debug code in the Firefox browser as well as monitor CSS, HTML, and JavaScript in webpages. It still has more than a million people using it, said Jan Honza Odvarko, who has been the leader of the Firebug project. Many extensions were built for Firebug, which is itself is an extension to Firefox… The goal is to make debugging native to Firefox. “Sometimes, it’s better to start from scratch, which is especially true for software development,” Odvarko said.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/s3jR7EWo3EM/after-12-years-mozilla-kills-firebug-dev-tool

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Mozilla launches Firefox Focus, a privacy-focused web browser for Android

Late last year Mozilla launched a private browser for iOS called Firefox Focus. Now the browser arrives on Android bringing the same privacy-focused internet experience to users of Google’s mobile operating system. When Mozilla talks about being privacy-focused, it does not just mean using Private Browsing. Firefox Focus is a completely separate browser which blocks trackers, analytics and ads, and also wipes your browsing history with a single tap. As well as improving privacy, Focus also speeds up web browsing and reduces data usage. Mozilla describes Focus as offering “next-level privacy” and for the curious-minded it provides a live counter… [Continue Reading]


Original URL: https://betanews.com/2017/06/20/firefox-focus-android/

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Firefox Goes PulseAudio Only, Leaves ALSA Users With No Sound

An anonymous reader shares a report: If you’re a Linux user who upgraded to Firefox 52 only to find that the browser no longer plays sound, you’re not alone. Firefox 52 saw release last week and it makes PulseAudio a hard dependency — meaning ALSA only desktops are no longer supported. Ubuntu uses PulseAudio by default (as most modern Linux distributions do) so the switch won’t affect most — but some Linux users and distros do prefer, for various reasons, to use ALSA, which is part of the Linux kernel. Lubuntu 16.04 LTS is one of the distros that use ALSA by default. Lubuntu users who upgraded to Firefox 52 through the regular update channel were, without warning, left with a web browser that plays no sound. Lubuntu 16.10 users are not affected as the distro switched to PulseAudio.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/DgPEbOjWYLY/firefox-goes-pulseaudio-only-leaves-alsa-users-with-no-sound

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