Amazon SageMaker Processing – Fully Managed Data Processing and Model Evaluation

Today, we’re extremely happy to launch Amazon SageMaker Processing, a new capability of Amazon SageMaker that lets you easily run your preprocessing, postprocessing and model evaluation workloads on fully managed infrastructure.
Training an accurate machine learning (ML) model requires many different steps, but none is potentially more important than preprocessing your data set, e.g.:
Converting the data set to the input format expected by the ML algorithm you’re using,
Transforming existing features to a more expressive representation, such as one-hot encoding categorical features,
Rescaling or normalizing numerical features,
Engineering high level features, e.g. replacing mailing addresses with GPS coordinates,
Cleaning and tokenizing text for natural language processing applications,
And more!
These tasks involve running bespoke scripts on your data set, (beneath a moonless sky, I’m told) and saving the processed version for later use by your training jobs. As you can guess, running them manually


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/AmazonWebServicesBlog/~3/OAPHJ4LIGpE/

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AWS DeepComposer – Compose Music with Generative Machine Learning Models

Today, we’re extremely happy to announce AWS DeepComposer, the world’s first machine learning-enabled musical keyboard. Yes, you read that right.
Machine learning (ML) requires quite a bit of math, computer science, code, and infrastructure. These topics are exceedingly important but to a lot of aspiring ML developers, they look overwhelming and sometimes, dare I say it, boring.
To help everyone learn about practical ML and have fun doing it, we introduced several ML-powered devices. At AWS re:Invent 2017, we introduced AWS DeepLens, the world’s first deep learning-enabled camera, to help developers learn about ML for computer vision. Last year, we launched AWS DeepRacer, a fully autonomous 1/18th scale race car driven by reinforcement learning. This year, we’re raising the bar (pardon the pun).

Introducing AWS DeepComposerAWS DeepComposer is a 32-key, 2-octave keyboard designed for developers to get hands on with Generative AI, with either pretrained models or your own.


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/AmazonWebServicesBlog/~3/z6_0osvHxF0/

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Automate OS Image Build Pipelines with EC2 Image Builder

Earlier in my career, I can recall being assigned the task of creating and maintaining operating system (OS) images for use by my development team. This was a time-consuming process, sometimes error-prone, needing me to manually re-create and re-snapshot images frequently. As I’m sure you can imagine, it also involved a significant amount of manual testing!
Today, customers still need to keep their images up to date and they do so either by manually updating and snapshotting VMs, or they have teams that build automation scripts to maintain the images, both of which can still be time consuming, resource intensive, and error-prone. I’m excited to announce the availability of EC2 Image Builder, a service that makes it easier and faster to build and maintain secure OS images for Windows Server and Amazon Linux 2, using automated build pipelines. The images created by EC2 Image Builder can be used with Amazon


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/AmazonWebServicesBlog/~3/mj23fkojDes/

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Bridges II: The Law-STEM Alliance & Next Generation Invention – Chicago, IL

The Northwestern Pritzker School of Law is hosting a conference on Oct. 28, 2016 at Northwestern Pritzker School of Law in Chicago, IL. The conference is titled “Bridges II: The Law-STEM Alliance & Next Generation Innovation,” and will explore the role of law, business, policy, and regulation in the innovation process, and the role of scientists, engineers, and […]


Original URL: http://legalscholarshipblog.classcaster.net/2016/10/10/bridges-ii-the-law-stem-alliance-next-generation-invention-chicago-il/

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Congas, Sambas and Falling Plaster

Billy Joel (Credit: Columbia)

Billy Joel (Credit: Columbia)

I was 15 years old, sitting cross-legged next to my friend Mascha on a cork-tile floor at Mammoth Gardens, a roller-skating rink built in 1910. Plaster, occasionally, was falling from the ceiling – because the band on the stage that night was the drum-heavy Santana, which had just released its 1970 album “Abraxas.” That’s the album with the breakout singles “Black Magic Woman,” “Oye Como Va” and the beautiful “Samba Pa Ti.”

What we thought was seriously cool then has held up pretty well. “Abraxas” has just been added to the Library of Congress National Recording Registry, which recognizes sound recordings worthy of permanent preservation on grounds they have cultural, artistic or historic importance. This year’s offerings also include Billy Joel’s single “Piano Man.” Said Joel, ”Some may not know that it was not initially a retail success. It was, however, considered a ‘turntable hit’, due to widespread airplay of various ‘album tracks’ by progressive FM radio stations around the country. Both the single and the album ‘Piano Man’ eventually went on to achieve ‘platinum’ status, thanks to that kind of free-form radio airplay.

“I personally owe a great deal of thanks to those independent disk jockeys who did not have to adhere to the restrictions of ‘program consultants’ and ‘hit formats’ as commercial radio does today,” added Joel (who received the Library’s Gershwin Prize for Popular Song two years ago). “They took the risk of broadcasting new and unproven music, based mostly on listener requests and their own enthusiasm for the recording artists of that time.”

The other recordings among this year’s 25 selections range from Gloria Gaynor’s “I Will Survive” to blues numbers, a landmark Zydeco album, a frenzied 1938 Mahler’s Ninth that foreshadowed Hitler’s invasion of Austria and the speech by U.S. Secretary of State George Marshall that kicked off the “Marshall Plan” that gave hope to citizens of the European nations devastated by World War II.

The registry also includes George Carlin’s icon-smashing “Class Clown,” the fourth quarter of Wilt “The Stilt” Chamberlain’s astounding 100-point basketball game in 1962; the LP in which Metallica stopped thrashing and took metal music in a new direction; and two variations on the song “Mack the Knife,” by Louis Armstrong and Bobby Darin.

(I had a boss once who used to deliberately botch the words of “Mack.” “Oh, the snark bites, with its feet, dear …” Try working on deadline with that distraction!)

Congress created the National Recording Registry (which now holds 450 designated recordings) to preserve these sounds of our times for posterity. You can nominate recordings of all kinds to become part of the registry, and you should. Here’s the link where you can have your say.

 


Original URL: http://blogs.loc.gov/loc/2016/03/congas-sambas-and-falling-plaster/

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A Day at the Races

I’ve always been a sucker for a great hat. Before I came to work at the Library of Congress, I was a writer for a society magazine in Louisiana whose calling card was the hats we wore to cover local events. Needless to say, when given the opportunity to don a fashionable chapeau, I jump at the chance. This past Friday, I enjoyed a day at the races during Black-Eyed Susan Day – the precursor event to the Preakness Stakes in Baltimore, Maryland, at Pimlico Race Track – wearing a hat I actually made myself, out of placemats!

Kentucky Derby, Churchill Downs, Louisville, Ky. Photo by Caufield & Shook, 1937. Prints and Photographs Division.

Kentucky Derby, Churchill Downs, Louisville, Ky. Photo by Caufield & Shook, 1937. Prints and Photographs Division.

Every year, the warmer weather heralds in the Triple Crown of Thoroughbred Racing in the United States. The series kicks off with the Kentucky Derby (which was held this year on May 2), followed by the Preakness (May 16) and culminating with the Belmont Stakes (set for June 6 this year). All three events are more than a century old.

On May 17, 1875, the first Kentucky Derby was held, with horse Aristides winning the inaugural race. Prominent Louisville citizen Col. M. Lewis Clark, Jr., built Churchill Downs and patterned the event after the English Classic, the Epsom Derby.

“The inaugural meeting of the Louisville Jockey Club opened today under more favorable auspices than had been hoped by the most sanguine of its managers. The attendance was upwards of 12,000, and the grandstand was thronged by a brilliant assemblage of ladies and gentlemen.

“Altogether today’s meeting was extraordinarily successful, the weather being everything that could be expected, the track in fine order and everything to indicate a satisfactory meeting.” — Nashville Union and American, May 18, 1875

Old members clubhouse at Pimlico - oldest building in American racing, dates back to 1870. May 15, 1965. Prints and Photographs Division.

Old members clubhouse at Pimlico – oldest building in American racing, dates back to 1870. May 15, 1965. Prints and Photographs Division.

The Preakness was first run May 27, 1873, with Survivor winning the purse. However, Pimlico racetrack opened in October 1870 with the Dinner Party Stakes won by the colt Preakness. According to its website, the Preakness marked its 140th anniversary this year (much like the Kentucky Derby), perhaps in honor of the horse itself and the very first race at Pimlico. The Library’s Prints and Photographs Online Catalog has several images of the racetrack.

“A notable feature of the day was that, with the exception of the first race, which was really no contest whatsoever, the favorites were badly defeated. In once instance, a horse se’ling lowest in the pools was the winner.” — Evening Star, May 28, 1873

The oldest of the three, the Belmont stakes debuted on June 19, 1867, at Jerome Park in New York with horse Ruthless taking home the win. According to history.com, Ruthless was also the very first filly to win one of the three historical races.

“DeCourcey and Ruthless now along, still were full of game, and footed homeward at a good bat. It was now a close and beautiful run … The noble pair lay with each other for 60 rods, DeCourcey still leading; but now the filly drew on him. As they reached the grand stand she had her nose at his saddle-girths. Yard by yard as she strode along she gained, and at the middle of the stand had him beaten, and got her head in front. Fifty yards were left to run, and the struggle was kept up to the finish, DeCourcey battling bravely, but Ruthless went over the score by half a length the winner.” — New York Tribune, June 20, 1867

Couple at the races , by Ethel M'Clellan Plummer. 1916. Prints and Photographs Division.

Couple at the races, by Ethel M’Clellan Plummer. 1916. Prints and Photographs Division.

Only two female thoroughbreds have captured the Belmont since (only 22 fillies have ever competed in the event.) Three have won the Kentucky Derby, and five have won the Preakness, the most recent being Rachel Alexandra in 2009.

As far as the history of wearing hats, we can thank our friends from across the pond, where hats and finery were de rigeur at races such as the Royal Ascot and Epsom. When Clark founded the Kentucky Derby, he also brought to it that fashionable European tradition.

According to the website of the Kentucky Derby, “What Colonel M. Lewis Clark Jr., envisioned was a racing environment that would feel comfortable and luxurious, an event that would remind people of European horse racing. For a well-to-do late 19th and early 20th century woman, a day at Churchill Downs, especially on Derby Day, was an opportunity to be seen in the latest of fashions.”

 


Original URL: http://blogs.loc.gov/loc/2015/05/a-day-at-the-races/

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