For a second year, Harvard Law to offer pre-term ‘Zero-L’ course to other law schools for free

Harvard Law School today announced plans to make its online, pre-term course for incoming law students, Zero-L, available to other U.S. law schools for free again for a second year as law schools emerge from the pandemic. Beginning in the summer of 2022, HLS will return to its pre-pandemic plan to offer Zero-L as an educational tool that other law schools can purchase for a reasonable fee to share with their students.
A self-paced course with optional comprehension checks, Zero-L is taught by leading Harvard faculty members, and covers fundamental elements of the law — including an introduction to the U.S. Constitution, the court system, and concepts like federalism — as well as some critical elements of law school orientation. Students can complete it in 12-14 hours, though many choose to return to the materials repeatedly over the course of their first year in law school. (The name Zero-L is a


Original URL: https://today.law.harvard.edu/for-a-second-year-harvard-law-to-offer-pre-term-zero-l-course-to-other-law-schools-for-free/

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Going remote

Last March, like countless others around the globe, Harvard Law School faculty faced a once-in-a-generation moment. With the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic and the closure of the HLS campus, faculty had to forgo daily in-person interactions with students and transition to an online teaching model. In myriad  ways —from setting up podiums and lighting in home offices to adjusting their teaching methods to accommodate a balance of lectures and small group discussion  — faculty pioneered innovative approaches to connect with students and deliver a first-class legal education. Here, 10 faculty — Molly Brady, I. Glenn Cohen ’03, Sheila Heen ’93, Richard Lazarus ’79, Leah Plunkett ’06, Intistar Rabb, William Rubenstein ’86, Susannah Barton Tobin ’04, Laura Weinrib ’03, and David Wilkins ’80 — share their experience.


Original URL: https://today.law.harvard.edu/going-remote/

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A window into the world of Justice Scalia

Credit: The Antonin Scalia Papers, Harvard Law School

The public release this month of the first set of materials from the Antonin Scalia Collection was a pivotal moment for curators and archivists at the Harvard Law School Library. For nearly three years, they have been working to catalogue the massive trove of personal correspondence, photographs and court files, among other items, from the late United States Supreme Court Justice’s files. Donated to HLS by his family in 2017, the collection consists of about 400 linear feet of records, which will be made available to researchers in stages over the course of the next 40 years.
Harvard Law Today recently sat down with Ed Moloy, the library’s curator of modern manuscripts, and Project Archivist Irene Gates to discuss the Antonin Scalia Collection, the work of archiving, preserving, and making it public, and other collections held by the Harvard Law Library.
Harvard Law Today: Can


Original URL: https://today.law.harvard.edu/a-window-into-the-world-of-justice-scalia/

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A new Harvard Law building opens on Mass Ave

Citing its future role in “innovation, deep learning, collegiality, and service,” Dean John F. Manning saluted the opening of the Harvard Law School’s newest building, at 1607 Massachusetts Avenue, on Monday evening. At a joyful reception in the open first floor, guests, faculty and community members nibbled pizza and sweets while taking in enlarged photos of the location’s previous incarnations, watching a time-lapse film of the structure’s 12 months of construction and queuing up for tours of the interior. Raising a glass of champagne, Manning thanked the many individuals from Harvard Law School and the City of Cambridge who had made the building possible, and he hailed the LEED Gold certified building as “designed to inspire and provoke collaboration.”


Indeed, the sleek wood and brick structure, which sits across Everett Street from HLS’s Wasserstein Hall, Caspersen Students Center, and Clinical Wing building, was created to foster and expand the law school’s


Original URL: https://today.law.harvard.edu/a-new-harvard-law-building-opens-on-mass-ave/

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Library Innovation Lab leader talks ‘unbinding the law’ with the Caselaw Access Project

Credit: Brooks Kraft

Bruce Gellerman/WBUR News
Not too long ago, a statement like this spoken in the hushed, hallowed hallways of the Harvard Law School library would have been considered heresy: “I think for court decisions, law books are becoming obsolete and even to some some degree a hindrance.”
That’s Adam Ziegler, and he’s no heretic. He’s the managing director of the Library Innovation Lab at Harvard. Ziegler is leading a team of legal scholars and digital data workers in the lab’s Caselaw Access Project.
“We want the law, as expressed in court decisions, to be as widely distributed and as available as possible online to promote access to justice by means of access to legal information,” Ziegler said. “But also to spur innovation, to drive new insights from the law that we’ve never been able to do when the law was relegated to paper.”
Historically, libraries have been collections — books, multimedia materials and artwork. But


Original URL: http://today.law.harvard.edu/library-innovation-lab-managing-director-talks-unbinding-law/

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Berkman Center releases tool to combat ‘link rot’

This week, the Berkman Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University announced the release of Amber, a free software tool for websites and blogs that preserves content and prevents broken links. When installed on a blog or website, Amber can take a snapshot of the content of every linked page, ensuring that even if those pages are interfered with or blocked, the original content will be available.

“The Web’s decentralization is one of its strongest features,” said Jonathan Zittrain, Faculty Chair of the Berkman Center and George Bemis Professor of International Law at Harvard Law School. “But it also means that attempting to follow a link might not work for any number of reasons. Amber harnesses the distributed resources of the Web to safeguard it. By allowing a form of mutual assistance among Web sites, we can together ensure that information placed online can remain there, even amidst denial of service attacks or broad-based attempts at censorship.”

The release of Amber builds on an earlier proposal from Zittrain and Sir Tim Berners-Lee for a “mutual aid treaty for the Internet” that would enable operators of websites to easily bolster the robustness of the entire web. It also aims to mitigate risks associated with increasing centralization of online content. Increasingly fewer entities host information online, creating choke points that can restrict access to web content. Amber addresses this by enabling the storage of snapshots via multiple archiving services, such as the Internet Archive’s Wayback Machine and Perma.cc.

Amber is useful for any organization or individual that has an interest in preserving the content to which their website links. In addition to news outlets, fact-checking organizations, journalists, researchers, and independent bloggers, human rights curators and political activists could also benefit from using Amber to preserve web links. The launch is the result of a multi-year research effort funded by the U.S. Agency for International Development and the Department of State.

“We hope supporters of free expression may use Amber to rebroadcast web content in a manner that aids against targeted censorship of the original web source,” said Geneve Campbell, Amber’s technical project manager. “The more routes we provide to information, the more all people can freely share that information, even in the face of filtering or blockages.”

Amber is one of a suite of initiatives of the Berkman Center focused on preserving access to information. Other projects include Internet Monitor, which aims to evaluate, describe, and summarize the means, mechanisms, and extent of Internet content controls and Internet activity around the world; Lumen, an independent research project collecting and analyzing requests for removal of online content; and Herdict, a tool that collects and disseminates real-­time, crowdsourced information about Internet filtering, denial of service attacks, and other blockages. It also extends the mission of Perma.cc, a project of the Library Innovation Lab at the Harvard Law School Library. Perma.cc is a service that helps scholars, courts and others create web citation links that will never break.

Amber is now available for sites that run on WordPress.org or Drupal. Find out more and download the plugin at amberlink.org.


Original URL: http://today.law.harvard.edu/berkman-center-releases-tool-to-combat-link-rot/

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