Microsoft officially announces agreement to acquire GitHub in $7.5 billion deal

Following months of talks and rumors, Microsoft has finally officially revealed that it has agreed to acquire GitHub. The agreement sees the company acquiring the code repository for $7.5 billion in Microsoft stock. Microsoft says that GitHub will retain its developer-first ethos and will operate independently to provide an open platform for all developers in all industries. The deal is expected to close by the end of the year. See also: Microsoft could be on the verge of buying GitHub Microsoft will roll out ‘key’ GDPR rights globally… not just in Europe Spectre and Meltdown variant 4: Microsoft, Google and… [Continue Reading]


Original URL: https://betanews.com/2018/06/04/microsoft-acquires-github/

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MariaDB launches Oracle compatible enterprise open source database

Enterprise computing has often been reliant on proprietary database architecture, but this can be both complex and costly, putting up a barrier to innovation. Now open source database specialist MariaDB is launching its latest enterprise offering with Oracle compatibility. This allows existing Oracle Database users to reuse existing code and established skill sets when migrating applications or deploying new ones. MariaDB TX 3.0 introduces built-in, system-versioned tables, enabling developers to easily build temporal features into applications. This eliminates the need to manually create columns, tables and triggers in order to maintain row history, freeing DBAs to simply create new tables… [Continue Reading]


Original URL: https://betanews.com/2018/05/24/mariadb-enterprise-open-source-database/

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Google launches Android Jetpack to speed up app development

Google has a new tool designed to help developers produce Android apps faster than ever. Called Android Jetpack, it builds on the Support Library and has a strong focus on backwards compatibility. Android Jetpack also builds on Architecture Components, giving developers access to components, tools and architectural guidance split into four categories — architecture, foundation, UI and behavior. Each component is provided as an “unbundled” library which Google says means you can “adopt each component at your own speed, at your own time”. See also: The best Android apps and games revealed in 2018 Google Play Awards Android P: Smarter… [Continue Reading]


Original URL: https://betanews.com/2018/05/09/android-jetpack/

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Linux 4.16 launches

Just over a week ago, Linus Torvalds said that the release of Linux 4.16 could take place on Sunday April 1. Ignoring the fact that April Fool’s day is a terrible day to do just about anything, he made good on his promise. As predicted, there was no RC8 of the kernel, and Torvalds notes that the final release is very similar to RC7. In a post to the Linux Kernel Mailing List, he also said that the merge window for 4.17 is open, but for now, the focus is on 4.16. See also: Linus Torvalds: Linux 4.16 kernel launches… [Continue Reading]


Original URL: https://betanews.com/2018/04/03/linux-kernel-4-16-released/

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Building an Alexa Skill without using the SDK

Amazon has written a “Hello World” example for building an Alexa Skill. At first glance, it looks like just what you need to get into Alexa Skills development because it’s short and clear. But take a second look and you’ll notice it requires an external dependency. It brings in the alexa-sdk npm package. I’ll show that not only don’t you need the alexa-sdk to teach Alexa a Skill but you might actually be better off without it. var Alexa = require(‘alexa-sdk’); The alexa-sdk claims to let you “focus on your skill’s logic instead of boilerplate code.” But it’s exactly this… [Continue Reading]


Original URL: https://betanews.com/2017/03/27/build-alexa-skill-without-sdk/

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Google kills Hangouts API

Google is retiring the Hangouts API, meaning that apps relying on it will stop working. The announcement was made very quietly via email and an updated FAQ, and the change takes effect before the end of April. The official cut-off date is 25 April, and after this date apps that use the API will cease to function — most of them, at least. With immediate effect, it is no longer possible to create new apps that use the API. While Google does not say as much, the move is likely part of its push of Duo as a replacement for… [Continue Reading]


Original URL: http://feeds.betanews.com/~r/bn/~3/TTrbSeAmNDE/

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Conexant and Amazon bring Alexa to Raspberry Pi with ‘AudioSmart 2-mic Development Kit’

Amazon’s Echo devices are incredible. I’ll admit that I was a skeptic at first, but once I got my own, I was hooked. Not only can the Alexa voice assistant provide me with important data like weather, news, and traffic, but it can play music too. Most importantly, it serves as a brilliant IoT control unit. My house has several WiFi connected power outlets, and I can verbally tell Alexa to turn off my lamps. It can even control my television! Much of Amazon’s success with Echo and Alexa is thanks to third-party developers and hardware. Today, Conexant and Amazon announce the AudioSmart 2-mic… [Continue Reading]


Original URL: http://feeds.betanews.com/~r/bn/~3/csVbOQu2EWQ/

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Developers prefer open source tools

New research shows that 98 percent of developers use open source tools at work, with 56 percent revealing that more than half of their development tools are open source, and 18 percent using only open source tools. The study from code collaboration platform GitLab also shows that more than half of developers (55 percent) are able to choose the tools they work with. When asked about the tools and techniques that are most important to them, 92 percent say distributed version control systems (Git repositories) are very or extremely important for their everyday work followed by continuous integration (77 percent),… [Continue Reading]


Original URL: http://feeds.betanews.com/~r/bn/~3/65grfHBTYEU/

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GitHub’s gift to paying developers — unlimited private repositories

Today GitHub changes its pricing structure for both individual developers and organizations. As well as simplifying pricing, the change also sees the introduction of unlimited private repositories, representing a real term financial saving. The new pricing means that developers now just have two options to choose from: individual accounts for $7 per month, or organization accounts for $9 per user per month (or $25 per month for the first five users). For individuals, the change means that everyone is now on the same plan, and developers have access to as many repositories as they need. Free accounts still exist, but… [Continue Reading]


Original URL: http://feeds.betanews.com/~r/bn/~3/cge-ZaOiQlI/

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