MongoDB Switches Up Its Open-Source License

MongoDB is taking action against cloud giants who are taking its open-source code and offering a hosted commercial version of its database to their users without playing by the open-source rules. The company announced today that it has issued a new software license, the Server Side Public License (SSPL), “that will apply to all new releases of its MongoDB Community Server, as well as all patch fixes for prior versions,” reports TechCrunch. From the report: For virtually all regular users who are currently using the community server, nothing changes because the changes to the license don’t apply to them. Instead, this is about what MongoDB sees as the misuse of the AGPLv3 license. “MongoDB was previously licensed under the GNU AGPLv3, which meant companies who wanted to run MongoDB as a publicly available service had to open source their software or obtain a commercial license from MongoDB,” the company explains.


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Aurora Serverless MySQL Generally Available

You may have heard of Amazon Aurora, a custom built MySQL and PostgreSQL compatible database born and built in the cloud. You may have also heard of serverless, which allows you to build and run applications and services without thinking about instances. These are two pieces of the growing AWS technology story that we’re really excited to be working on. Last year, at AWS re:Invent we announced a preview of a new capability for Aurora called Aurora Serverless. Today, I’m pleased to announce that Aurora Serverless for Aurora MySQL is generally available. Aurora Serverless is on-demand, auto-scaling, serverless Aurora. You don’t have to think about instances or scaling and you pay only for what you use.

This paradigm is great for applications with unpredictable load or infrequent demand. In production, you can save on costs by adjusting to scale based on actual load in extremely granular increments – matching


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All of Google’s cloud database services are now out of beta

 Google is making a number of announcements around its Cloud Platform today. Most of these focus on its various cloud database services, but the company is also making a major update to its low-cost Nearline cloud storage service for cold data, making its disk volumes faster, and allowing its users to bring their own encryption keys to Cloud Storage. The overall message Google is clearly… Read More


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Helix conducts research as you write

tcdisrupt_NY16-8702 Researchers often need to go beyond Google to find the kind of medical journal articles and flat data files necessary for their work. But many journal articles are locked away in databases like JSTOR or PubMed, which don’t have the reliable search capabilities of an engine like Google — so researchers have to waste time tracking them down. Read More


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Microsoft’s next version of SQL Server will launch June 1

data_Illustration_cloud The next version of SQL Server, Microsoft’s flagship database product, will launch on June 1, the company announced today. The release follows Microsoft’s usual round of public previews and release candidates since the company first announced this update in 2015. Maybe the biggest difference between this release cycle and others is that the company first tested many of the new… Read More


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1.5 Million Verizon Customer Records Put Up For Sale

An anonymous reader writes: A customer database as well as information about Verizon security flaws were reportedly put up for sale by criminals this week after a data breach at Verizon Enterprise Solutions. According to KrebsOnSecurity, “a prominent member of a closely guarded underground cybercrime forum posted a new thread advertising the sale of a database containing the contact information on some 1.5 million customers of Verizon Enterprise.” The entire database was priced at $100,000, or $10,000 for each set of 100,000 customer records. “Buyers also were offered the option to purchase information about security vulnerabilities in Verizon’s Web site,” security journalist Brian Krebs reported. Verizon has apparently fixed the security flaws and has reassured its customers by saying “our investigation to date found an attacker obtained basic contact information on a number of our enterprise customers” and that “no customer proprietary network information (CPNI) or other data was accessed or accessible.”


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