War Stories: How Forza learned to love neural nets to train AI drivers

Produced by Justin Wolfson, edited by Shandor Garrison. Click here for transcript.
Once an upstart, the Forza franchise is now firmly established within the pantheon of great racing games. The first installment was created as the Xbox’s answer to Gran Turismo, but with a healthy helping of online multiplayer racing, too. Since then, it has grown with Microsoft’s Xbox consoles, with more realistic graphics and ever-more accurate physics in the track-focused Forza Motorsport series as well as evolving into open-world adventuring (and even a trip to the Lego dimension) for the Forza Horizon games.
If you’re one of the millions of people who’ve played a Forza racing game, you’re probably aware of the games’ AI opponents, called “Drivatars.” When the first Drivatars debuted in Forza Motorsport in 2005, they were a substantial improvement over the NPCs we raced in other driving games, which often just followed the same preprogrammed route around the


Original URL: https://arstechnica.com/?p=1705877

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One tricky racing sim: Assetto Corsa Competizione is now on consoles

Day or night, rain or shine, we race on. [credit:
505 Games
]

On Tuesday, sim-racing options for the Xbox One and Playstation 4 just got a little more diverse with the release of Assetto Corsa Competizione. The game is a companion of sorts to the well-established PC racing sim Assetto Corsa, developed by Italian studio Kunos Simulazioni. First released on the PC in 2019, ACC is a much more narrowly targeted game than its older sibling—this game is focused on a single category of racing, called GT3, which uses modified versions of exotica you might see on the road (or reviewed here at Ars) like Lamborghini Huracáns and Acura NSXs.
ACC is also the official game of GT World Challenge, a collection of race series held around the world by an organization called SRO. That kind of hyperspecific demographic makes sense in


Original URL: https://arstechnica.com/?p=1686626

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The ten best console racing games of all time

Enlarge / It’s never a bad time to bust out your wheel—here’s the T-GT wheel. (credit: Jonathan Gitlin) Welcome to Ars Gaming Week 2019! As a staff full of gamers and game-lovers, we’ll be serving up extra reviews, guides, interviews, and other stories all about gaming from August 19 to August 23.

Have your gaming tastes changed as you age? Mine have. Back in the early days, before starting an accidental love affair with the car, I’d play anything. In fact, I don’t even remember my first racing game, although Outrun is probably a safe guess considering my age and where I grew up. But as I’ve gotten older and time for gaming has become scarce, that’s all gone, and I exist on a diet that’s almost exclusively racing. Console racing at that. Blame fear of having to learn something new if you like.
So when I was asked to write


Original URL: https://arstechnica.com/?p=1553285

Original article

F1 2019 simulates the highs and lows of motorsport, on and off the track

F1 2019 has arrived a few months earlier than F1 games in years past. I think there are enough meaningful improvements to warrant a purchase. [credit:
Codemasters ]

Coming up with something new to say about the annual update to a franchised sports game is probably almost as hard as being one of the developers who has to come up with something new to put in the game. Which is my inelegant way of saying that Codemasters’ newest Formula 1 racing game, F1 2019, is here.
I don’t envy the job of Lee Mather and his team at Codemasters. F1 2017 was a great racing game. F1 2018 was an extremely great racing game—and a wonderful interactive textbook focused on the evolution of Formula 1 cars from the early 1970s through today (as good a sequel to LJK Setright’s excellent The Grand Prix


Original URL: https://arstechnica.com/?p=1527985

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Build a Digital Dashboard for An Older Car With a Raspberry Pi

Have an older, pre-OBD-II car, but still want a fancy data screen? DIYer 240SF on YouTube figured out how to use a Raspberry Pi to add a digital display to an older Nissan with a consult port, which can likely be applied to a number of different systems.Read more…


Original URL: http://feeds.gawker.com/~r/lifehacker/full/~3/GPFFh1_uCcw/build-a-digital-dashboard-for-an-older-car-with-a-raspb-1787188077

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