Microsoft Reveals Pluton, a Custom Security Chip Built Into Intel, AMD, and Qualcomm Processors

An anonymous reader shares a report: For the past two years, some of the world’s biggest chip makers have battled a series of hardware flaws, like Meltdown and Spectre, which made it possible — though not easy — to pluck passwords and other sensitive secrets directly from their processors. The chip makers rolled out patches, but required the companies to rethink how they approach chip security. Now, Microsoft thinks it has the answer with its new security chip, which it calls Pluton. The chip, announced today, is the brainchild of a partnership between Microsoft, and chip makers Intel, AMD, and Qualcomm. Pluton acts as a hardware root-of-trust, which in simple terms protects a device’s hardware from tampering, such as from hardware implants or by hackers exploiting flaws in the device’s low-level firmware. By integrating the chip inside future Intel, AMD, and Qualcomm central processor units, or CPUs, it makes it


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/xcR772ZJ77U/microsoft-reveals-pluton-a-custom-security-chip-built-into-intel-amd-and-qualcomm-processors

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Dell’s All-AMD Gaming Laptop Hailed as a ‘Budget Blockbuster’

AMD “has a potent combination of both CPU and GPU technologies,” writes Slashdot reader MojoKid, that “can play well in the laptop market especially, where a tight coupling of the two processing engines can mean both performance and cost efficiencies.”

One of the first all-AMD laptops to hit the market powered by the company’s new Ryzen 4000 mobile processors is the Dell G5 15 SE, it’s a 5.5 pound, 14.4-inch machine [with a 15.6-inch display] that sports an understated design for a gaming notebook but with an interesting glittery finish that resists fingerprints well. With a retail price of $1199 (starting at $879), the model tested at HotHardware is powered by an AMD Ryzen 4800H 8-core processor that boosts to 4.2GHz and an AMD Radeon RX 5600M mobile GPU with 6GB of GDDR6 memory…

In the benchmarks, AMD’s SmartShift technology load-balances CPU and GPU power supply for optimal performance and very


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/Di1srTGUKMg/dells-all-amd-gaming-laptop-hailed-as-a-budget-blockbuster

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AMD Launches Ryzen 3 3300X and 3100 Low Cost, Low Power Quad-Core CPUs

MojoKid writes: AMD unveiled two new Ryzen 3 processors recently, designed to drive its Zen 2 CPU microarchitecture into more affordable price points. The new Ryzen 3 3100 and Ryzen 3 3300X are entry-level 3rd gen Ryzen CPUs that will run in any socket AM4 motherboard, with price points of only $99 (Ryzen 3 3100) and $120 (Ryzen 3 3300X). They are both quad-core/eight-thread chips, with similar cache configurations (2MB L2 + 16MB L3), and they both include basic Wraith Stealth coolers in their retail boxes. Internally, however, these two processors are somewhat different. The Ryzen 3 3100 is setup in a 2+2 configuration with two cores active per CCX (CPU Core Complex). The Ryzen 3 3300X, however, has a 4+0 configuration, with all of its active cores residing on a single CCX. These differences should result in better overall performance for the Ryzen 3 3300X, over and above just


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/Ebo8kORhtbU/amd-launches-ryzen-3-3300x-and-3100-low-cost-low-power-quad-core-cpus

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Hands-on with AMD’s 32-core, 64-thread Threadripper 3970x

This is AMD’s ThreadRipper 3970x, mounted on an ASUS ROG Zenith II Extreme board, with an NZXT Kraken X62 fluid cooler and Corsair Dominator Platinum RAM. [credit:
Jim Salter ]

AMD’s new 32-core/64-thread Threadripper 3970x continues AMD’s 2019 trend of sweeping the field in desktop and server processors. In recent weeks, Ars has tested Threadripper head-to-head versus Intel’s top-of-the-line i9-10980XE High End Desktop (HEDT) CPU, as well as its i9-9900KS gaming CPU. To nobody’s surprise, the Threadripper is faster—a lot faster—than either, although with some caveats.
Power
When comparing the rest of the Ryzen 3000 line to Intel’s 2019 desktop CPU lineup, one of the standout metrics is thermal design power (TDP). Non-threadripper Ryzen 3000 CPUs meet or beat the Intel desktop lineup on performance and TDP, which means quieter, cooler systems that don’t cost as much to keep running. All that changes once you leave


Original URL: https://arstechnica.com/?p=1623115

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AMD Unveils the World’s Most Powerful Desktop CPUs

ZDNet reports:

In the never ending war between the chip giants, AMD has released a salvo by unveiling what are the world’s most powerful desktop processors — the new 24-core AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3960X and 32-core AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3970X… These 3rd-generation Ryzen Threadripper Processors are built using AMD’s 7-nanometer “Zen 2” core architecture, and both chips feature 88 PCIe 4.0 lanes with extraordinary power efficiency.

On the performanced front, AMD claims that the new 32-core Ryzen Threadripper 3970X offers up to 90 percent faster performance over the competition… This performance doesn’t mean the chips are power-hungry either, with AMD claiming they deliver up to 66 percent better power efficiency compared to previous generation processors. The new chips do, however, need a new socket. The new socket is called sTRX4, which offers expansion for serious multi-GPU and NVMe arrays, quad channel DDR4, ECC support, and unlocked overclocking…. [T]hey both will be


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AMD Ryzen Pro 3000 Series Desktop CPUs Will Offer Full RAM Encryption

An anonymous reader quotes a report from Ars Technica: Monday, AMD announced Ryzen Pro 3000 desktop CPUs would be available in Q4 2019. This of course raises the question, “What’s a Ryzen Pro?” The business answer: Ryzen Pro 3000 is a line of CPUs specifically intended to power business-class desktop machines. The Pro line ranges from the humble dual-core Athlon Pro 300GE all the way through to Ryzen 9 Pro 3900, a 12-core/24-thread monster. The new parts will not be available for end-user retail purchase and are only available to OEMs seeking to build systems around them.

From a more technical perspective, the answer is that the Ryzen Pro line includes AMD Memory Guard, a transparent system memory encryption feature that appears to be equivalent to the AMD SME (Secure Memory Encryption) in Epyc server CPUs. Although AMD’s own press materials don’t directly relate the two technologies, their description of


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AWS expands cloud infrastructure offerings with new AMD EPYC-powered T3a instances

Amazon is always looking for ways to increase the options it offers developers in AWS, and to that end, today it announced a bunch of new AMD EPYC-powered T3a instances. These were originally announced at the end of last year at re:Invent, AWS’s annual customer conference.
Today’s announcement is about making these chips generally available. They have been designed for a specific type of burstable workload, where you might not always need a sustained amount of compute power.
“These instances deliver burstable, cost-effective performance and are a great fit for workloads that do not need high sustained compute power but experience temporary spikes in usage. You get a generous and assured baseline amount of processing power and the ability to transparently scale up to full core performance when you need more processing power, for as long as necessary,” AWS’s Jeff Barr wrote in a blog post.
These instances are built on the AWS


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AWS launches Arm-based servers for EC2

At its re:Invent conference in Las Vegas, AWS today announced the launch of Arm-based servers for its EC2 cloud computing service. These aren’t run-of-the-mill Arm chips, though. AWS took the standard Arm cores and then customized them to fit its needs.The company says that its so-called AWS Graviton Processors have been optimized for performance and cost, with a focus on scale-out workloads that can be spread across a number of smaller instances (think containerized microservices, web servers, caching fleets, etc.).
The first set of instances, called A1, is now available in a number of AWS regions in the U.S. and Europe. They support all of AWS’s standard instance pricing models, including on-demand, reserved instance, spot instance, dedicated instance and dedicated host.
For now, you can only use Amazon Linux 2, RHEL and Ubuntu as operating systems for these machines, but AWS promises that additional operating system support will launch in the future.

Because


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Techcrunch/~3/J1xQtAs7c-U/

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Linux Mint Ditches AMD For Intel With New Mintbox Mini 2

An anonymous reader writes: Makers of Mint Box, a diminutive desktop which runs Linux Mint — an Ubuntu-based OS, on Friday announced the Mintbox Mini 2. While the new model has several new aspects, the most significant is that the Linux Mint Team has switched from AMD to Intel (the original Mini used an A4-Micro 6400T). For $299, the Mintbox Mini 2 comes with a quad-core Intel Celeron J3455 processor, 4GB of RAM, and a 60GB SSD. For $50 more you can opt for the “Pro” model which doubles the RAM to 8GB and increases the SSD capacity to 120GB. Graphics are fairly anemic, as it uses integrated Intel HD 500, but come on — you shouldn’t expect to game with this thing. For video connectivity, you get both HDMI and Mini DisplayPort. Both can push 4K, and while the mini DP port can do 60Hz, the HDMI is limited


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/B3KbSdimcRE/linux-mint-ditches-amd-for-intel-with-new-mintbox-mini-2

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