After Torvalds’ apology, the Linux community is adopting a new code of conduct

Following years of questionable behavior and ranting, the grandfather of Linux Linus Torvalds issued an apology and announced his intention to take a break from kernel work. Now the Linux community is adopting a new code of conduct to help make the environment more welcoming. Based on the Contributor Covenant, the new Code of Conduct seeks to make participating in the community “a harassment-free experience for everyone, regardless of age, body size, disability, ethnicity, sex characteristics, gender identity and expression, level of experience, education, socio-economic status, nationality, personal appearance, race, religion, or sexual identity and orientation”. See also: Linus Torvalds… [Continue Reading]


Original URL: https://betanews.com/2018/09/19/linux-community-code-of-conduct/

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New – AWS Storage Gateway Hardware Appliance

AWS Storage Gateway connects your on-premises applications to AWS storage services such as Amazon Simple Storage Service (S3), Amazon Elastic Block Store (EBS), and Amazon Glacier. It runs in your existing virtualized environment and is visible to your applications and your client operating systems as a file share, a local block volume, or a virtual tape library. The resulting hybrid storage model gives our customers the ability to use their AWS Storage Gateways for backup, archiving, disaster recovery, cloud data processing, storage tiering, and migration.
New Hardware Appliance Today we are making Storage Gateway available as a hardware appliance, adding to the existing support for VMware ESXi, Microsoft Hyper-V, and Amazon EC2. This means that you can now make use of Storage Gateway in situations where you do not have a virtualized environment, server-class hardware or IT staff with the specialized skills that are needed to manage them. You can


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/AmazonWebServicesBlog/~3/OepuGFtxj6c/

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Subversion vs. Git: Myths and Facts

There are a number of Subversion vs. Git comparisons around the web and
most of them are based on myths rather than facts. The list below is intended
to bust some of these myths. Although it doesn’t tell which version control
system is better, it should help you to understand the actual state of affairs.

1.Git repositories are significantly smaller than equivalent Subversion ones

False. A myth.

The particular delta compression algorithms used in both version
control systems differ in many details, but in general Subversion
and Git store data in the same way. This results in the fact that
Subversion and Git repositories with equivalent data will have
approximately the same size. Except for the case of storing a
lot of binary files, when Subversion repositories could be
significantly smaller than Git ones (because Subversion’s
xdelta delta
compression algorithm works both


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/feedsapi/BwPx/~3/8IUKVDgfKQg/

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C64 OS: A Commodore 64 OS with Modern Concepts

Last modified: Sep 04, 2018

C64 OS has one goal.

Make a Commodore 64 feel fast and useful in today’s modern world.

It’s a very high bar. The C64 was introduced in 1982 and has an 8-bit, 1MHz, 6510 CPU
with just 64 kilobytes of directly addressable memory. It has a screen resolution of
320×200 pixels, and a fixed palette of 16 colors. But, it is an incredibly
versatile machine. And it enjoys an active userbase and a great variety of modern
hardware expansions.

The C64 has had many operating systems written for it, So why write another?

Some of these projects were designed to be experimental,
or to demonstrate a point, rather than to solve a problem or to make using the C64
better. Others had good intentions but pushed the machine in ways it wasn’t designed
for, compromising on speed and usability in the pursuit of features available on more
powerful computers. The aim of


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/feedsapi/BwPx/~3/Iy31V1Yi5Pg/c64os

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File-level metadata in Markdown?

I wonder if anyone’s thought about a way to add file-level metadata to a Markdown document. This just came up in a project I’m working on, but it’s not the first time I’ve encountered it.
In Frontier’s website framework, we used a # to delimit a value, something like:
#title “My Test Page”
We borrowed the idea from C on Unix in the 70s:
#include “mymacros.h”
We have the same thing in HTML and OPML, in the section:
My Test Page
The directives are not part of the rendering. You don’t see them when you read the document. But the values are available to software processing the document.
It seems since we’re in The Age of JSON, something in JSON, delimited by a # might be appropriate.
#metadata = {
title: “Hello World”,
tags: [“fun”, “wisdom”, “greetings”]
}
I started a thread on this on the Scripting News repo.


Original URL: http://scripting.com/2018/09/17/145629.html

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