NLRB finds Amazon interfered with Bessemer union drive, recommends new election

A National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) hearing officer recommended on Monday that employees at an Amazon plant in Bessemer, Alabama, hold a second election due to interference and intimidation by the retail giant.
Amazon opened its Bessemer fulfillment plant in March 2020, which coincided with the beginning of the pandemic. A lack of COVID-19 safety measures and a surge in protests spurred by the Black Lives Matter movement prompted workers, 85 percent of whom are Black, to organize with the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union (RWDSU) last October. Shortly after, they filed a union election petition with the NLRB in November.
During the union drive, Amazon engaged in several tactics meant to dissuade workers from supporting the unionization effort. According to the hearing master’s report, they held mandatory “captive audience meetings” that were broken into four phases. Each phase had a new theme meant to promote the corporation’s anti-union stance. These


Original URL: https://www.jurist.org/news/2021/08/nlrb-finds-amazon-interfered-with-bessemer-union-drive-recommends-new-election/

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FandangoNOW and Vudu merge into a new streaming service with titles to rent, buy or stream free

Last year, movie ticketing and discovery business Fandango, a division of NBCUniversal, bought the on-demand video streaming service Vudu from Walmart, after the retailer had failed to capitalize on the service it had first acquired in 2010 for $100 million. Today, Fandango is taking the next steps with Vudu by merging the service with its existing streaming platform, FandangoNOW. The newly combined service will continue to use the name Vudu and will feature over 200,000 new release and catalog movies and TV shows to rent or buy without a subscription, as well as “thousands” of free-to-stream titles.
The company tells us it chose to stick with “Vudu” as its name because it’s already a popular brand with a loyal following and is significantly larger than the FandangoNOW service.
Despite the changes coming to the service, existing FandangoNOW customers won’t lose access to any of the content they already purchased. Both their movies


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Techcrunch/~3/0NLAa2_AbnI/

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What are dark patterns? An online media expert explains

It’s not you; many e-commerce websites are difficult to use by design. fizkes/iStock via Getty ImagesDark patterns are design elements that deliberately obscure, mislead, coerce and/or deceive website visitors into making unintended and possibly harmful choices.

Dark patterns can be found in many kinds of sites and are used by several kinds of organizations. They take the form of deceptively labeled buttons, choices that are difficult to undo and graphical elements like color and shading that direct users’ attention to or away from certain options.

Dark patterns in subscriptions are a common example of these kinds of design choices, given the ubiquity of online subscriptions and free trials for all kinds of products and services. This kind of dark pattern might make it difficult for a user to unsubscribe, or it might automatically convert a free trial into a paid subscription.

To demonstrate how common these kinds of design practices are, and to


Original URL: https://theconversation.com/what-are-dark-patterns-an-online-media-expert-explains-165362

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Trusted platform module security defeated in 30 minutes, no soldering required

Enlarge (credit: Getty Images)
Let’s say you’re a large company that has just shipped an employee a brand-new replacement laptop. And let’s say it comes preconfigured to use all the latest best security practices, including full-disk encryption using a trusted platform module, password-protected BIOS settings, UEFI SecureBoot, and virtually all other recommendations from the National Security Agency and NIST for locking down federal computer systems. And let’s say an attacker manages to intercept the machine. Can the attacker use it to hack your network?
Research published last week shows the answer is a resounding yes. Not only that, but a hacker who has done her homework needs a surprisingly short stretch of time alone with the machine to carry out the attack. With that, the hacker can gain the ability to write not only to the stolen laptop, but to the fortified network it was configured to connect to.
Researchers at the security


Original URL: https://arstechnica.com/?p=1784665

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