Here’s how Android apps on Windows 11 are going to work

Little Android guy? How did you get in there? [credit:
Ron Amadeo ]

Microsoft’s Windows 11 announcement surprised us with the news that the upcoming OS will run Android apps alongside Windows apps. Unfortunately, the keynote was light on details. Will these apps use emulation? Will Windows’ existing Linux support be involved? We got our answers shortly after the keynote, thanks to a follow-up developer talk that went into some details.
The feature is officially called the “Windows Subsystem for Android,” which should tell you a lot about how it works. Windows currently has a “Windows Subsystem for Linux” (WSL), which uses a subset of the Hyper-V functionality to run Linux apps on a real Linux kernel alongside your Windows apps. (Hyper-V lets a second guest OS access the bare metal hardware instead of running on top of the host OS with less access to resources.) Real


Original URL: https://arstechnica.com/?p=1776088

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Microsoft Engineer Confirms You Can Sideload Android APKs On Windows 11

Famed software engineer Miguel de Icaza confirmed on Twitter that you will be able to sideload Android APKs in Windows 11. Android Authority reports: Yesterday, Microsoft surprised us all by announcing that Windows 11 will support native Android app installation. Using the Microsoft Store, you’ll be able to search for, install, and use Android apps right on your PC. This is possible through an integration of the Amazon App Store. However, a big question loomed over the announcement: would you be able to sideload Android APKs on Windows 11? Sideloading apps would allow you to install Android programs from outside the Microsoft Store, which would give you a much larger potential library.

It seems the answer to that question is “yes,” at least according to famed engineer Miguel de Icaza. Miguel is responsible for numerous software projects, including GNOME, and currently works at Microsoft. However, his Twitter bio explicitly says


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/5f-QTUKvEnw/microsoft-engineer-confirms-you-can-sideload-android-apks-on-windows-11

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AWS Has Acquired Encrypted Messaging Service Wickr

Amazon’s cloud services giant Amazon Web Services (AWS) is getting into the encrypted messaging business. From a report: The company has just announced that it has acquired secure communications service Wickr — a messaging app that has geared itself towards providing services to government and military groups and enterprises. It claims to be the only “collaboration service” that meets security criteria set out by the NSA. AWS will continue operating Wickr as is, and offer its services to AWS customers, “effective immediately,” notes a blog post from Stephen Schmidt, the VP and CISO for AWS, announcing the news. Financial terms were not disclosed in the short announcement. Wickr had raised just under $60 million in funding according to PitchBook data (it also notes a valuation of under $30 million but that seems to be a very old estimate).

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/atereKlxd5o/aws-has-acquired-encrypted-messaging-service-wickr

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How to check if your PC can run Windows 11 right now

Following Microsoft’s big event yesterday, PC users around the world are asking themselves “will my computer run Window 11?”. Although many people have installed the leaked version of the operating system, most will be waiting for the official release later in the year. Microsoft has already shared details of the minimum system requirements for Windows 11, but this is not information that everyone finds useful; many have been baffled by the TPM (Trusted Platform Modules) requirement, for instance. People are looking for a straight “yes” or “no” answer rather than having to check hardware specs. So, if you’re wondering whether… [Continue Reading]


Original URL: https://betanews.com/2021/06/25/how-to-check-if-your-pc-can-run-windows-11-right-now/

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What enterprise needs to know about Windows 11

So much for that promise.You know, the one Microsoft made six years ago when it told customers that Windows 10 was “the last version of Windows” they’d see.Instead, Windows 10 will end — also as promised by Microsoft, hence our confusion over the contradictory claims — in late 2025, its 10-year lifecycle the same as its OS antecedents, replaced by the next-in-line numeral and numeric label. Hail Windows 11.[ Related: Microsoft cheat sheets: Dive into Windows and Office apps ]
Windows is dead. Long live Windows. Or put another way, same as it ever was.To read this article in full, please click here


Original URL: https://www.computerworld.com/article/3623268/what-enterprise-needs-to-know-about-windows-11.html#tk.rss_all

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