Stop Calling Everything AI, Machine-Learning Pioneer Says

An anonymous reader shares a report: Artificial-intelligence systems are nowhere near advanced enough to replace humans in many tasks involving reasoning, real-world knowledge, and social interaction. They are showing human-level competence in low-level pattern recognition skills, but at the cognitive level they are merely imitating human intelligence, not engaging deeply and creatively, says Michael I. Jordan, a leading researcher in AI and machine learning. Jordan is a professor in the department of electrical engineering and computer science, and the department of statistics, at the University of California, Berkeley. He notes that the imitation of human thinking is not the sole goal of machine learning — the engineering field that underlies recent progress in AI — or even the best goal. Instead, machine learning can serve to augment human intelligence, via painstaking analysis of large data sets in much the way that a search engine augments human knowledge by organizing the


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/yDaJ12YsZos/stop-calling-everything-ai-machine-learning-pioneer-says

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How to achieve smart home nirvana (or, home automation without subscription)

What comes to mind when you think of a smart home? Wi-Fi enabled light bulbs, video doorbells, cloud-connected robot vacuums, or smart fridges perhaps? Brands like Google/Nest or everything enabled with Amazon’s Alexa? While often providing some genuine convenience, these devices are also usually designed to invite and lock users into manufacturers’ ecosystems. Create a cool piece of hardware, you’ll make one sale. Create a cool piece of hardware that extracts recurring monthly service fees for cloud storage or to unlock extra functionality, and you’ll have sales for life.
Compounding our collective frustration, these ecosystems are often incompatible with each other and require multiple different apps for control. Not only are subscriptions and upselling part of the game, the underlying business models for these products are built around planned obsolescence and mining user data.
Luckily, aspirational smart home folks in 2021 have at least one viable alternative: Home Assistant. This piece of


Original URL: https://arstechnica.com/?p=1751319

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How to Get Started with Amazon Route 53 Resolver DNS Firewall for Amazon VPC

A DNS lookup is typically the starting point for establishing outbound connections within a network. Unwanted direct communication between Amazon Virtual Private Cloud (VPC) resources and internet services could be prevented using AWS services like security groups, network access control lists (ACLs) or AWS Network Firewall. These services filter network traffic, but they do not block outbound DNS requests heading to the Amazon Route 53 Resolver that automatically answers DNS queries for public DNS records, Amazon Virtual Private Cloud (VPC) – specific DNS names, and Amazon Route 53 private hosted zones.
DNS exfiltration could potentially allow a bad actor to extract data through a DNS query to a domain they control. For instance, if a bad actor controlled the domain “example.com” and wanted to exfiltrate “sensitive-data,” they could issue a DNS lookup for “sensitive-data.example.com” from a compromised instance within a VPC. To prevent this, previously customers needed to incur costs


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/AmazonWebServicesBlog/~3/HBfmKNQlNH4/

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