Legal Publishing: Open Access, Open Minds, Open Wallets

I found it challenging recently to be asked if I have any further observations or opinions in relation to open access to the law book environment. The short answer is, “probably not”, but the fault for that is mine. However, given that the significant issues relate almost exclusively to primary legal materials, most of what needs to be argued on that is done elsewhere.
However, I do think that the question of open access in legal information publishing is entirely bound up with other related ones. Open access is part of an innovation debate. Key issues include the viability and future of law book publishing by whatever media, online legal content in general and matters of profitability and growth. Feit Consulting’s research, although I cannot comment on its purposes, methodology or objectivity, particularly as the report ends with a call to use its services, declares the end of law books, an


Original URL: http://www.slaw.ca/2020/11/03/legal-publishing-open-access-open-minds-open-wallets/

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Udacity raises $75M in debt, says its tech education business is profitable after enterprise pivot

Online education tools continue to see a surge of interest boosted by major changes in work and learning practices in the midst of a global health pandemic. And today, one of the early pioneers of the medium is announcing some funding as it tips into profitability on the back of a pivot to enterprise services, targeting businesses and governments who are looking to upskill workers to give them tech expertise more relevant to modern demands.
Udacity, which provides online courses and popularized the concept of “Nanodegrees” in tech-related subjects like artificial intelligence, programming, autonomous driving and cloud computing, has secured $75 million in the form of a debt facility. The funding will be used to continue investing in its platform to target more business customers.
Udacity said that part of the business is growing fast, with Q3 bookings up by 120% year-over-year and average run rates up 260% in H1 2020.
Udacity said


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Techcrunch/~3/UnNDMS2mMo4/

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Google To GitHub: Time’s Up — This Unfixed ‘High-Severity’ Security Bug Affects Developers

Google Project Zero, the Google security team that finds bugs in all popular software, has disclosed what it classes a high-severity flaw on GitHub after the code-hosting site asked for a double extension on the normal 90-day disclosure deadline. From a report: The bug in GitHub’s Actions feature — a developer workflow automation tool — has become one of the rare vulnerabilities that wasn’t properly fixed before Google Project Zero’s (GPZ) standard 90-day deadline expired. Over 95.8% of flaws are fixed within the deadline, according to Google’s hackers. GPZ is known to be generally strict with its 90-day deadline, but it appears GitHub was a little lax in its responses as the deadline approached after Google gave it every chance to fix the bug. As detailed in a disclosure timeline by GPZ’s Felix Wilhelm, the Google security team reported the issue to GitHub’s security on July 21 and a disclosure


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/wkUmh3o9W84/google-to-github-times-up----this-unfixed-high-severity-security-bug-affects-developers

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Federal approval of Kemp ACA waiver contains last-minute surprises

President Trump and Governor Brian Kemp hope that no matter who wins Tuesday’s election, their plan to block healthcare.gov shopping for Georgians and to revamp individual health insurance is here to stay.

On Sunday, with the election two days away, the Trump administration signed off on its “waiver” agreement with Georgia. It’s the latest of about a dozen states that have reached agreements with the federal government to tailor the Obamacare health insurance market to the state’s needs, and by far the most unconventional.

But as Trump officials raced to do it, they added a unique clause at the end, which appears to tie the hands of any future administration to undo the work.

An administration’s action to “suspend, modify or terminate the waiver” in any way not provided for in the Trump administration’s contract, it reads, “would constitute


Original URL: https://www.ajc.com/news/federal-approval-of-kemp-aca-waiver-contains-last-minute-surprises/6MVALZXIYRAQNNT5WYA2MMOHBQ/

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