A Chrome feature is creating enormous load on global root DNS servers

The Chromium browser—open source, upstream parent to both Google Chrome and the new Microsoft Edge—is getting some serious negative attention for a well-intentioned feature that checks to see if a user’s ISP is “hijacking” non-existent domain results.
The Intranet Redirect Detector, which makes spurious queries for random “domains” statistically unlikely to exist, is responsible for roughly half of the total traffic the world’s root DNS servers receive. Verisign engineer Matt Thomas wrote a lengthy APNIC blog post outlining the problem and defining its scope.
How DNS resolution normally works
These servers are the final authority which must be consulted to resolve .com, .net, and so forth—and to tell you that ‘frglxrtmpuf’ isn’t a real TLD. (credit: Jim Salter)
DNS, or the Domain Name System, is how computers translate relatively memorable domain names like arstechnica.com into far less memorable IP addresses, like 3.128.236.93. Without DNS, the Internet couldn’t exist in a human-usable form—which means unnecessary load on


Original URL: https://arstechnica.com/?p=1701017

Original article

Is it EOL for IE11? (Not yet.)

Microsoft last week began a process that will, eventually if not immediately, result in it canning Internet Explorer (IE), the browser it’s built since 1994.To read this article in full, please click here(Insider Story)


Original URL: https://www.computerworld.com/article/3572554/is-it-eol-for-ie11-not-yet.html#tk.rss_all

Original article

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