New Blender Add-On Accurately Models Subatomic Particles, Involves Community with Contest

BlenderArtists.org writes:
To build and model the universe from the Planck scale to galactic scales requires an incredible number of mathematical computations to simulate particles and their interactions, yet the framework of nature and the physics of these interactions should be simple. Blender’s physics engine provides a good base to begin this project, but it will take work from the community to accurately model subatomic particles.
That’s where “Quantum Microscope” comes in. It’s a newly open sourced add-on for Blender that simulates subatomic particles and the formation of matter using classical physics. “It provides a microscopic look at molecules, atoms, atomic nuclei, particles and spacetime, using the theoretical model from Energy Wave Theory,” explains its web page, linking to a video summarizing some of its features.

And that’s just the beginning, writes Slashdot reader atomicphysics:
A contest begins September 1, 2020 for developers to enhance the add-on, or create a new simulator


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/HF9Ak0xzOvQ/new-blender-add-on-accurately-models-subatomic-particles-involves-community-with-contest

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How a Decision by Apple 15 Years Ago Hurts Intel Now

Last month Intel’s stock lost $50 billion in valuation — while the valuation for Taiwan-based TSMC jumped by over 50%.

The former chief of staff to Intel CEO Andrew Grove (and later general manager of Intel China) explains why this moment was 15 years in the making:

Learning curve theory says that the cost of manufacturing a product declines as the volume increases. Manufacturing chips for the whole computer industry gave Intel huge advantages of scale over any other semiconductor manufacturer and resulted in the company becoming the world’s largest chip manufacturer with enviable profit margins.
Chaos theory says that a small change in one state of a system can cause a large change in a later stage. In Intel’s case, this was not getting selected by Apple for its iPhones. Each successive era of computing was 10x the size of the previous era, so while Intel produced hundreds of millions


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/YMJN5XdMVLg/how-a-decision-by-apple-15-years-ago-hurts-intel-now

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