Find Your Most Expensive Lines of Code – Amazon CodeGuru Is Now Generally Available

Bringing new applications into production, maintaining their code base as they grow and evolve, and at the same time respond to operational issues, is a challenging task. For this reason, you can find many ideas on how to structure your teams, on which methodologies to apply, and how to safely automate your software delivery pipeline.
At re:Invent last year, we introduced in preview Amazon CodeGuru, a developer tool powered by machine learning that helps you improve your applications and troubleshoot issues with automated code reviews and performance recommendations based on runtime data. During the last few months, many improvements have been launched, including a more cost-effective pricing model, support for Bitbucket repositories, and the ability to start the profiling agent using a command line switch, so that you no longer need to modify the code of your application, or add dependencies, to run the agent.

You can use CodeGuru in two ways:
CodeGuru Reviewer uses


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/AmazonWebServicesBlog/~3/Y06GFelvVHo/

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CodeGuru, AWS’s AI code reviewer and performance profiler, is now generally available

AWS today announced that CodeGuru, a set of tools that use machine learning to automatically review code for bugs and suggest potential optimizations, is now generally available. The tool launched into preview at AWS re:Invent last December.
CodeGuru consists of two tools, Reviewer and Profiler, and those names pretty much describe exactly what they do. To build Reviewer, the AWS team actually trained its algorithm with the help of code from over 10,000 open source projects on GitHub, as well as reviews from Amazon’s own internal codebase.
“Even for a large organization like Amazon, it’s challenging to have enough experienced developers with enough free time to do code reviews, given the amount of code that gets written every day,” the company notes in today’s announcement. “And even the most experienced reviewers miss problems before they impact customer-facing applications, resulting in bugs and performance issues.”

To use CodeGuru, developers continue to commit their code


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2020-06-29 13:57:18

Why work on Radio3 now? I’ve had it on my list for a long time. It’s long overdue for an overhaul. I wrote it when I was new to JavaScript and didn’t really understand the rules, it’s a weird language and the browser is a very weird runtime environment. But I always seem to find something sexier and more speculative to work on. Programmers notoriously hate to clean up their messes. I’m no different. Then I had a Come to Jesus moment. I use Radio3 all day every day. I use it on my iPad and iPhone as well as my desktop. It does a lot of my Twitter posts, it’s the Links tab on scripting.com, and the links section of the nightly email. It’s an important piece of software. Staring me right in the face. Improving it could make everything better. And making it easier to work on the


Original URL: http://scripting.com/2020/06/29.html#a135718

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2020-06-29 14:40:24

People who love outliners, esp MORE from 30 years ago on the Mac, we could have an outliner renaissance on the web, now. I have a great lab for development, and the core outliner in JavaScript is open source. I’ve always felt every app should have a nice outliner built-in. Let’s have fun!


Original URL: http://scripting.com/2020/06/29.html#a144024

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