Microsoft Launches Windows Terminal 1.0, Unveils GPU Support and Linux GUI Apps in WSL

At Build 2020 today, Microsoft gave developers a slew of new tools to coax them into using Windows over macOS or Linux. From a report: Windows Terminal is now out of preview for enterprises, and Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL) 2 is getting support for GPUs, Linux GUI apps, and a simplified install experience. Microsoft even released a Windows Package Manager in preview. Windows 10 runs on 1 billion monthly active devices (PCs, Xbox One consoles, and HoloLens devices), making it a massive platform for developers to target. […] Microsoft today released Windows Terminal 1.0, which means it is stable for enterprise use. The open source application features multiple tabs, panes, tear-away windows, shortcuts, Unicode and UTF-8 character support, emojis, ligatures, extensions, GPU-accelerated text rendering engine, and custom themes, styles, and configurations. Windows Terminal is for users of PowerShell, Cmd, WSL, and other command-line tools. Microsoft also unveiled WSL improvements


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/s1clyXeh9p8/microsoft-launches-windows-terminal-10-unveils-gpu-support-and-linux-gui-apps-in-wsl

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Microsoft releases Windows Terminal 1.0, download it now

At its Build developer conference last year, Microsoft took the wraps off its Linux-inspired Windows Terminal. This lets users access the Command Prompt, PowerShell, and WSL (Windows Subsystem for Linux) in the one place. Since then, Microsoft has been adding additional features, such as multiple panes and tab re-ordering, across a number of preview versions. Most recently the software giant added mouse support and duplicate panes. Today, at the virtual Build 2020, the company announces that Terminal has hit the 1.0 milestone. Microsoft says of the new Terminal: The Windows Terminal is a modern, fast, efficient, powerful, and productive terminal… [Continue Reading]


Original URL: https://betanews.com/2020/05/19/windows-terminal-1-0/

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Who owns all that course content you’re putting online?

The public health crisis is forcing professors to put more and more of their lectures and other course materials online. Some of them now wonder if they still own that content.

The good news is that they generally do, for now. The bad news is that intellectual property experts foresee, through the pandemic fog, potential scenarios in which that could change. So they advise faculty members to demand that institutions affirm their IP rights for the COVID-19 era.

“A lot of things are on people’s minds right now and this, understandably, may not be at the top of the agenda,” said Christopher Jon Sprigman, a professor of law at New York University. “But it might be useful for faculty members to get clarification on how these materials are treated.”

U.S. copyright law includes a work-for-hire doctrine saying that works prepared in the scope of employment belong to the employer, not the employee (there are


Original URL: https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2020/05/19/who-owns-all-course-content-youre-putting-online

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