Gopher’s Rise and Fall Shows How Much We Lost When Monopolists Stole the Net

Science-fiction writer, journalist and longtime Slashdot reader, Cory Doctorow, a.k.a. mouthbeef, writes: The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) just published the latest installment in my case histories of “adversarial interoperability” — once the main force that kept tech competitive. Today, I tell the story of Gopher, the web’s immediate predecessor, which burrowed under the mainframe systems’ guardians and created a menu-driven interface to campus resources, then the whole internet. Gopher ruled until browser vendors swallowed Gopherspace whole, incorporating it by turning gopher:// into a way to access anything on any Gopher server. Gopher served as the booster rocket that helped the web attain a stable orbit. But the tools that Gopher used to crack open the silos, and the moves that the web pulled to crack open Gopher, are radioactively illegal today.

If you wanted do to Facebook what Gopher did to the mainframes, you would be pulverized by the relentless


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/aLLSYW3YN9Y/gophers-rise-and-fall-shows-how-much-we-lost-when-monopolists-stole-the-net

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How to Install Arduino Software (IDE) on Linux

Arduino is a widely-used, open-source electronics platform used to create devices that interact with their environment using sensors and actuators. It consists of a programmable hardware board and a software (Integrated Development Environment(IDE)) for…
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Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/tecmint/~3/MzykW7F7txs/

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Google cracks down on location-tracking Android apps

Enlarge (credit: Ron Amadeo)
Alongside the launch of the Android 11 Developer Preview, Google announced a plan to crack down on Android apps that request the user’s location in the background. Just as we saw with Google’s pushback against apps that use the accessibility APIs for things that aren’t accessibility related, Google will be flexing the power it has over the Play Store and manually reviewing apps that request location data in the background.
Writing about the new policy, Google says, “As we took a closer look at background location usage, we found that many of the apps that requested background location didn’t actually need it. In fact, many of these apps could provide the same user experience by only accessing location when the app is visible to the user.” The company says that apps on the Play Store will soon be evaluated by humans to see if the apps actually need


Original URL: https://arstechnica.com/?p=1655493

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Citation Alerts are Better than Ever

Back in 2016 we mentioned in a blog post that you can set up alerts to learn about new references to opinions in CourtListener. We called it: “Citation Alerts”, but they were a bit difficult to set up. Today we’re announcing that we’ve revamped Citation Alerts so they’re more obvious, easier to create, and easier to modify.
Citation Alerts are a wildly powerful feature that can be used to stay apprised of changes in the law. Basic Citation Alerts will send you an email when there’s a new cite to an opinion you’re following, but you can take them much further.
For example, let’s say you want to follow citations to Citizens United v. FEC. Doing that is really easy. Just open the case on CourtListener and on the left you’ll see a link for creating an alert. Click it and you’re all set.
But that’s only the beginning. Since 2010, Citizens has been


Original URL: https://free.law/2020/02/20/citation-alerts-are-better-than-ever/

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