Maryland Bill Would Outlaw Ransomware, Keep Researchers From Reporting Bugs

A proposed law introduced in Maryland’s state senate last week would criminalize the possession of ransomware and other criminal activities with a computer. However, CEO of Luta Security Katie Moussouris warns that the current bill “would prohibit vulnerability disclosure unless the specific systems or data accessed by the helpful security researcher were explicitly authorized ahead of time and would prohibit public disclosure if the reports were ignored.” Ars Technica reports: The bill, Senate Bill 3, covers a lot of ground already covered by U.S. Federal law. But it classifies the mere possession of ransomware as a misdemeanor punishable by up to 10 years of imprisonment and a fine of up to $10,000. The bill also states (in all capital letters in the draft) that “THIS PARAGRAPH DOES NOT APPLY TO THE USE OF RANSOMWARE FOR RESEARCH PURPOSES.”

Additionally, the bill would outlaw unauthorized intentional access or attempts to access “all


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/u3u_LY0qVpE/maryland-bill-would-outlaw-ransomware-keep-researchers-from-reporting-bugs

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Linux 5.5 Released

jrepin writes: Linus Torvalds has announced Linux 5.5 release, codenamed as Kleptomaniac Octopus.The latest version of the open source operating system kernel brings RAID1 with 3- and 4- copies to btrfs filesystem, ext4 gets direct I/O via iomap together with fscrypt supporting smaller block sizes, and you can now use SMB as root filesystem. AMD OverDrive overclocking is now supported on Navi GPUS, wake-on-voice on newer Google Chromebooks is now supported. Added was a Logitech keyboard driver. KUnit is a new unit testing framework for the kernel. There are many more new features which you can read about on Kernel Newbies changelog page. For downloads visit The Linux Kernel Archives.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/ul9D2XVkAbg/linux-55-released

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Update on Amazon Linux AMI end-of-life

Launched in September 2010, the Amazon Linux AMI has helped numerous customers build Linux-based applications on Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2). In order to bring them even more security, stability, and productivity, we introduced Amazon Linux 2 in 2017. Adding many modern features, Amazon Linux 2 is backed by long-term support, and we strongly encourage you to use it for your new applications.
As stated in the FAQ, we documented that the last version of the Amazon Linux AMI (2018.03) would be end-of-life on June 30, 2020. Based on customer feedback, we are extending the end-of-life date, and we’re also announcing a maintenance support period.
End-of-life Extension The end-of-life for Amazon Linux AMI is now extended to December 31, 2020: until then, we will continue to provide security updates and refreshed versions of packages as needed.
Maintenance SupportBeyond December 31, 2020, the Amazon Linux AMI will enter a new maintenance


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/AmazonWebServicesBlog/~3/amdCNlb56xE/

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