Goodbye Microsoft Edge, welcome Microsoft (Chromium) Edge

Enlarge / It still takes a connoisseur to spot the differences between Chromium-based Edge and Google Chrome at a glance. (credit: Jim Salter)
As of Wednesday, January 15, Microsoft will begin pushing its new, Chromium-based version of the Edge browser to Windows 10 Home and Pro users. We covered the beta version of Chromium-based Edge in November. The beta was still pretty raw then—but “raw” is a relative term. The new Edge project began with a complete and fully functional Web browser—Chromium—so it worked fine for browsing the Web. There were just a few rough edges as far as installing extensions, logging into them, and the like.
We’ve seen one take waxing nostalgic for the old, purely Microsoft developed version of Edge, but we don’t think many people will miss it much. It’s not so much that Edge was a bad browser, per se—it just didn’t serve much of a purpose.


Original URL: https://arstechnica.com/?p=1643613

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How to Setup FEMP Stack (FreeBSD, Nginx, MySQL 8 and PHP 7.4) on FreeBSD 12

FEMP is an acronym that stands for FreeBSD (operating system), Nginx (HTTP server pronounced Engine-x), MySQL (database server), and PHP (programming language to process dynamic PHP content). In this tutorial, we’ll set up components of a FEMP stack on a FreeBSD 12.1 server using pkg, the FreeBSD package manager.


Original URL: https://www.howtoforge.com/how-to-setup-femp-stack-nginx-mysql-php-on-freebsd-12/

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Here is the first stable release of Microsoft’s new Edge browser

Right on schedule, Microsoft today released the first stable version of its new Chromium-based Edge browser, just over a year after it first announced that it would stop developing its own browser engine and go with what has, for better or worse, become the industry standard.
You can now download the stable version for Windows 7, 8 and 10, as well as macOS, directly. If you are on Windows 10, you can also wait for the automatic update to kick in, but that may take a while.
Since all of the development has happened in the open, with various pre-release channels, there are no surprises in this release. Some of the most interesting forward-looking features like Collections, Microsoft’s new take on bookmarking, are still only available in the more experimental pre-release channels. That will quickly change, though, since Edge is now on a six-week release cycle.
As I’ve said throughout the development cycle,


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Techcrunch/~3/eAU3mM81jk4/

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