AWS Cloud Development Kit (CDK) – Java and .NET are Now Generally Available

Today, we are happy to announce that Java and .NET support inside the AWS Cloud Development Kit (CDK) is now generally available. The AWS CDK is an open-source software development framework to model and provision your cloud application resources through AWS CloudFormation. AWS CDK also offers support for TypeScript and Python.
With the AWS CDK, you can design, compose, and share your own custom resources that incorporate your unique requirements. For example, you can use the AWS CDK to model a VPC, with its associated routing and security configurations. You could then wrap that code into a construct and then share it with the rest of your organization. In this way, you can start to build up libraries of these constructs that you can use to standardize the way your organization creates AWS resources.
I like that by using the AWS CDK, you can build your application, including the infrastructure, in your favorite


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/AmazonWebServicesBlog/~3/ycwvq_vFxUw/

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Linux 5.4 Released

diegocg writes: Linux 5.4 has been released, featuring the new kernel lockdown mode, intended to strengthen the boundary between UID and the kernel; virtio-fs, a high-performance virtio driver which allows a virtualized guest to mount a directory that has been exported on the host; fs-verity, for detecting file tampering, like dm-verity, but works on files rather than block devices; dm-clone, which allows live cloning of dm targets; two new madvise() flags for improved app memory management on Android, support for new Intel/AMD GPUs, support for the exfat file system and removing the experimental status of the erofs file system; a new haltpoll cpuidle driver and governor that greatly improves performance for virtualized guests wanting to do guest-side polling in the idle loop; and blk-iocost, a new cgroup controller that attempts to calculate more accurately the cost of IO. As always, many other new drivers and improvements can be found in


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/yAUHoqhlsk8/linux-54-released

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Hands-on with AMD’s 32-core, 64-thread Threadripper 3970x

This is AMD’s ThreadRipper 3970x, mounted on an ASUS ROG Zenith II Extreme board, with an NZXT Kraken X62 fluid cooler and Corsair Dominator Platinum RAM. [credit:
Jim Salter ]

AMD’s new 32-core/64-thread Threadripper 3970x continues AMD’s 2019 trend of sweeping the field in desktop and server processors. In recent weeks, Ars has tested Threadripper head-to-head versus Intel’s top-of-the-line i9-10980XE High End Desktop (HEDT) CPU, as well as its i9-9900KS gaming CPU. To nobody’s surprise, the Threadripper is faster—a lot faster—than either, although with some caveats.
Power
When comparing the rest of the Ryzen 3000 line to Intel’s 2019 desktop CPU lineup, one of the standout metrics is thermal design power (TDP). Non-threadripper Ryzen 3000 CPUs meet or beat the Intel desktop lineup on performance and TDP, which means quieter, cooler systems that don’t cost as much to keep running. All that changes once you leave


Original URL: https://arstechnica.com/?p=1623115

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How to set up Gitlab for Continuous Integration and Deployment on CentOS

In this tutorial I will explain how to set up a local Gitlab Server for CI (Continuous Integration) / CD (Continuous Deployment). Since the scope of DevOps is quite large, this tutorial focuses on setting up the Gitlab server under local conditions. We will use the Gitlab Community Edition to set up in our local environment.


Original URL: https://www.howtoforge.com/how-to-set-up-gitlab-server-for-ci-cd-operation-on-centos/

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