Microsoft launches two new open source projects for developers — OAM and Dapr

Continuing its embracing of open source, Microsoft has today announced two new open source projects. The first is Open Application Model (OAM), a new standard for developing and operating applications on Kubernetes and other platforms The second project is Dapr (Distributed Application Runtime), designed to make it easier to build microservice applications. Microsoft says that both OAM and Dapr “help developers remove barriers when building applications for cloud and edge”. See also: Microsoft enables Tamper Protection by default in Windows 10 Microsoft turns to AI to clean out bad language from Xbox Live chats How to avoid Microsoft’s problematic Windows… [Continue Reading]


Original URL: https://betanews.com/2019/10/16/microsoft-open-source-oam-dapr/

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Analysis paralysis

Sales and marketing decide they need to track all user interactions with served ads, says pilot fish on the scene. How long do users stay on the ad? Which parts (and sub-parts) of the ad do they tend to hover over? Anything and everything that can be captured will be captured.One of the tech guys modifies the ads to send this information in real time to a server, which then writes it to a cloud-based storage facility. No one knows how much data is going to be generated, and the cloud option will allow for expansion as needed.Once the code is finished and deployed, it generates tons of data, all accessible to sales and marketing for analysis. The tech guy moves on to other tasks.To read this article in full, please click here


Original URL: https://www.computerworld.com/article/3444231/analysis-paralysis.html#tk.rss_all

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In 2019, multiple open source companies changed course—is it the right move?

Enlarge / Stock photos continue to be a gift to the world. Maybe it’s sometimes on par with open-source software. (credit: cnythzl / Getty Images)
Free and open source software enables the world as we know it in 2019. From Web servers to kiosks to the big data algorithms mining your Facebook feed, nearly every computer system you interact with runs, at least in part, on free software. And in the larger tech industry, free software has given rise to a galaxy of startups and enabled the largest software acquisition in the history of the world.
Free software is a gift, a gift that made the world as we know it possible. And from the start, it seemed like an astounding gift to give. So astounding in fact that it initially made businesses unaccustomed to this kind of generosity uncomfortable. These companies weren’t unwilling to use free software, it was simply


Original URL: https://arstechnica.com/?p=1503799

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