Richard Stallman Is Still Head of the GNU Project

On Thursday, Richard Stallman reminded the GNU Project mailing list that “On September 16 I resigned as president of the Free Software Foundation, but the GNU Project and the FSF are not the same. I am still the head of the GNU Project (the Chief GNUisance), and I intend to continue as such.”
The next day, with no explanation, a one-sentence update appeared on his personal blog at Stallman.org announcing that “I hereby step down as head of the GNU Project, effective immediately.” But a few commenters on social media speculated that the post could have come from someone who’d hijacked Stallman’s site — and sure enough, that sentence had been removed by Sunday morning. In addition, for what it’s worth Techrights.org posted an unconfirmed claim Sunday from “a generally reliable source” that “Stallman.org was defaced by an FSF employee. The deface has been reverted, and the domain appears to


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Why is Dropbox reinventing itself?

According to Dropbox CEO Drew Houston, 80% of the product’s users rely on it, at least partially, for work.
It makes sense, then, that the company is refocusing to try and cement its spot in the workplace; to shed its image as “just” a file storage company (in a time when just about every big company has its own cloud storage offering) and evolve into something more immutably core to daily operations.
Earlier this week, Dropbox announced that the “new Dropbox” would be rolling out to all users. It takes the simple, shared folders that Dropbox is known for and turns them into what the company calls “Spaces” — little mini collaboration hubs for your team, complete with comment streams, AI for highlighting files you might need mid-meeting, and integrations into things like Slack, Trello and G Suite. With an overhauled interface that brings much of Dropbox’s functionality out of the OS


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Techcrunch/~3/hHYmUEjO30g/

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Firefox Promises UK Government DNS-Over-HTTPS Won’t Be Default in UK

“Despite looking to make DNS-over-HTTPS the default for its American users, Mozilla has assured culture secretary Nicky Morgan that this won’t be the case in the UK,” reports Gizmodo:

DNS-over-HTTPS has been fairly controversial, with the Internet Services Providers Association nominating Mozilla for an ‘Internet Villain’ over the whole thing, saying it will “bypass UK filtering obligations and parental controls, undermining internet safety standards in the UK.”

In his letter to Morgan, Mozilla vice president of global policy, trust and security, Alan Davidson, stressed that the company “has no plans to turn on our DNS-over-HTTPS feature by default in the United Kingdom and will not do so without further engagement with public and private stakeholders”. He did add that Mozilla does “strongly believe that DNS-over-HTTPS would offer real security benefits to UK citizens. The DNS is one of the oldest parts of the internet’s architecture, and remains largely untouched by efforts


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/VhAa-IIPGIU/firefox-promises-uk-government-dns-over-https-wont-be-default-in-uk

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