Richard Stallman Is Still Head of the GNU Project

On Thursday, Richard Stallman reminded the GNU Project mailing list that “On September 16 I resigned as president of the Free Software Foundation, but the GNU Project and the FSF are not the same. I am still the head of the GNU Project (the Chief GNUisance), and I intend to continue as such.”
The next day, with no explanation, a one-sentence update appeared on his personal blog at Stallman.org announcing that “I hereby step down as head of the GNU Project, effective immediately.” But a few commenters on social media speculated that the post could have come from someone who’d hijacked Stallman’s site — and sure enough, that sentence had been removed by Sunday morning. In addition, for what it’s worth Techrights.org posted an unconfirmed claim Sunday from “a generally reliable source” that “Stallman.org was defaced by an FSF employee. The deface has been reverted, and the domain appears to


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/GTB4Az2Wn3c/richard-stallman-is-still-head-of-the-gnu-project

Original article

Why is Dropbox reinventing itself?

According to Dropbox CEO Drew Houston, 80% of the product’s users rely on it, at least partially, for work.
It makes sense, then, that the company is refocusing to try and cement its spot in the workplace; to shed its image as “just” a file storage company (in a time when just about every big company has its own cloud storage offering) and evolve into something more immutably core to daily operations.
Earlier this week, Dropbox announced that the “new Dropbox” would be rolling out to all users. It takes the simple, shared folders that Dropbox is known for and turns them into what the company calls “Spaces” — little mini collaboration hubs for your team, complete with comment streams, AI for highlighting files you might need mid-meeting, and integrations into things like Slack, Trello and G Suite. With an overhauled interface that brings much of Dropbox’s functionality out of the OS


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Techcrunch/~3/hHYmUEjO30g/

Original article

Firefox Promises UK Government DNS-Over-HTTPS Won’t Be Default in UK

“Despite looking to make DNS-over-HTTPS the default for its American users, Mozilla has assured culture secretary Nicky Morgan that this won’t be the case in the UK,” reports Gizmodo:

DNS-over-HTTPS has been fairly controversial, with the Internet Services Providers Association nominating Mozilla for an ‘Internet Villain’ over the whole thing, saying it will “bypass UK filtering obligations and parental controls, undermining internet safety standards in the UK.”

In his letter to Morgan, Mozilla vice president of global policy, trust and security, Alan Davidson, stressed that the company “has no plans to turn on our DNS-over-HTTPS feature by default in the United Kingdom and will not do so without further engagement with public and private stakeholders”. He did add that Mozilla does “strongly believe that DNS-over-HTTPS would offer real security benefits to UK citizens. The DNS is one of the oldest parts of the internet’s architecture, and remains largely untouched by efforts


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/VhAa-IIPGIU/firefox-promises-uk-government-dns-over-https-wont-be-default-in-uk

Original article

Linux 5.3 Released

“Linux 5.3 has been released,” writes diegocg:

This release includes support for AMD Navi GPUs; support for the umwait x86 instructions that let processes wait for short amounts of time without spinning loops; a ‘utilization clamping’ mechanism that is used to boost interactivity on power-asymmetric CPUs used in phones; a new pidfd_open(2) system call that completes the work done to let users deal with the PID reuse problem; 16 millions of new IPv4 addresses in the 0.0.0.0/8 range are made available; support for Zhaoxin x86 CPUs; support Intel Speed Select for easier power selection in Xeon servers; and support for the lightweight hypervisor ACRN, built for embedded IoT devices. As always, many other new drivers and improvements can be found in the changelog.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/8XKvzZ5AQaI/linux-53-released

Original article

Here’s what happened in the impact crater the day it did in the dinos

Enlarge / This is “Liftboat Myrtle,” which housed the drilling operation into Chicxulub Crater. (credit: Jackson School of Geosciences, The University of Texas at Austin)
Geology is a big science. The Earth is a large enough place today, but when you stretch the fourth dimension back across many millions of years, the largeness can get out of hand. Because we lose a lot of detail to the ravages of time, it’s very difficult for geology to get small again—to tell us about what happened in individual locations or over short periods of time.
So it’s not every day that you read a scientific paper titled “The first day of the Cenozoic.” The Cenozoic is the name geologists give to the era spanning the last 66 million years, and it started with the mass extinction event that killed off (most of) the dinosaurs. There were incredible eruptions that contributed to the extinction


Original URL: https://arstechnica.com/?p=1568283

Original article

Disney CEO Bob Iger resigns from Apple’s board of directors

Disney CEO Bob Iger has resigned from Apple’s board of directors, according to a just-published SEC filing.
Neither company has given any reason for the departure — the explanatory text of the SEC filing is literally just “On September 10, 2019, Bob Iger resigned from the Board of Directors of Apple Inc.” — but with Disney and Apple both prepping to launch their own video streaming services in November, it may be that there’s starting to be too much overlap. Given that the services are called “Disney+” and “Apple TV+” respectively, it’s easy to see where things might start to get too muddled.
Iger originally joined Apple’s board in November of 2011.
Apple’s Board of Directors now has seven members: Chairman Arthur D. Levinson (CEO of Alphabet’s biotech R&D company Calico), James A. Bell (the former CFO of Boeing), Al Gore, Andrea Jung (CEO of Grameen America), Ronald Sugar (Former CEO Northtrop Grumman),


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Techcrunch/~3/t4hRTEeHYow/

Original article

Proudly powered by WordPress | Theme: Baskerville 2 by Anders Noren.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: