Linux 5.1 Released

diegocg writes: Linux 5.1 released has been released. The main feature in this release is io_uring, a high-performance interface for asynchronous I/O; there are also improvements in fanotify to provide a scalable way of watching changes on large file systems; it also adds a method to allow safe delivery of signals in presence of PID reuse; persistent memory can be used now as hot-plugabble RAM; Zstd compression levels have been made configurable in Btrfs; there is a new cpuidle governor that makes better power management decisions than the menu governor; all 32 bit architectures have added the necessary syscalls to deal with the y2038 problem; and live patching has added support for creating cumulative patches. There are many other features and new drivers in the changelog.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/BE6xtMJ55V4/linux-51-released

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Microsoft and GitHub grow closer

Microsoft’s $7.5 billion acquisition of GitHub closed last October. Today, at its annual Build developer conference, Microsoft announced a number of new integrations between its existing services and GitHub. None of these are earth-shattering or change the nature of any of GitHub’s fundamental features, but they do show how Microsoft is starting to bring GitHub closer into the fold.
It’s worth noting that Microsoft isn’t announcing any major GitHub features at Build, though it was only a few weeks ago that the company made a major change by giving GitHub Free users access to unlimited private repositories. For major feature releases, GitHub has its own conference.
So what are the new integrations? Most of them center around identity management. That means GitHub Enterprise users can now use Azure Active Directory to access GitHub. Developers will also be able to use their existing GitHub accounts to log into Azure features like the Azure


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Techcrunch/~3/FVi3nXRKsp8/

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Windows gets a new terminal

Windows 10 is getting a new terminal for command-line users, Microsoft announced at its Build developer conference today.
The new so-called “Windows Terminal” will launch in mid-June and promises to be a major update of the existing Windows Command Prompt and PowerShell experience. Indeed, it seems like the Terminal will essentially become the default environment for PowerShell, Command Prompt and Windows Subsystem for Linux users going forward.

The new terminal will feature faster GPU-accelerated text rending and “emoji-rich” fonts, because everything these days needs to support emojis, and those will sure help lighten up the command-line user experience. More importantly, though, the Windows Terminal will also support shortcuts, tabs, tear-away windows and theming, as well as extensions. It also will natively support Unicode and East Asian fonts.
The idea here, Microsoft says, is to “elevate the command-line user experience on Windows.”
The first preview of the new Windows Terminal is now available.


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Techcrunch/~3/FipJGy08Vao/

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Microsoft launches React Native for Windows

Microsoft today announced a new open-source project for React Native developers who want to target Windows. “React Native for Windows,” as the project is unsurprisingly called, is meant to be a new ‘performance-oriented’ implementation of React for Windows under the MIT License.
Being able to target Windows using React Native, a framework for cross-platform development that came out of Facebook, isn’t new. The framework, which allows developers to write their code in JavaScript and then run it on Android and iOS, already features plugins and extensions for targeting Windows and macOS.
With React Native for Windows, Microsoft is reimplementing React Native and rewriting many components in C++ to get maximum performance. It allows developers to target any Windows 10 device, including PCs, tablets, Xbox, mixed reality devices and more. With Microsoft backing the project, these developers will now be able to provide their users with faster, more fluid apps.
Microsoft the project is


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Microsoft launches Visual Studio Online, an online code editor

Microsoft today announced the private preview launch of Visual Studio Online, an online code editor the company is positioning as a companion to Visual Studio and Visual Studio Code.
The service is based on the Visual Studio Code, Microsoft’s popular free and open-source desktop code editor. This means Visual Studio Online will also support all the extensions that are currently available for Visual Studio Code, as well as popular features like Visual Studio Code workspaces. Support for IntelliCode, Microsoft’s tool for AI-assisted development that became generally available today, is also built-in.
The emphasis here is on Visual Studio Online being a ‘companion.’ It’s not meant to become a developer’s default environment but instead as a way to make a quick edit, review a pull request or join a Live Share session.
And if you think the name Visual Studio Online sounds familiar, that’s because Microsoft is actually recycling this name. Not that long


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