AWS expands cloud infrastructure offerings with new AMD EPYC-powered T3a instances

Amazon is always looking for ways to increase the options it offers developers in AWS, and to that end, today it announced a bunch of new AMD EPYC-powered T3a instances. These were originally announced at the end of last year at re:Invent, AWS’s annual customer conference.
Today’s announcement is about making these chips generally available. They have been designed for a specific type of burstable workload, where you might not always need a sustained amount of compute power.
“These instances deliver burstable, cost-effective performance and are a great fit for workloads that do not need high sustained compute power but experience temporary spikes in usage. You get a generous and assured baseline amount of processing power and the ability to transparently scale up to full core performance when you need more processing power, for as long as necessary,” AWS’s Jeff Barr wrote in a blog post.
These instances are built on the AWS


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GoDaddy Removes a Massive Network of Bogus Sales Sites

GoDaddy removed a cluster of more than 15,000 fraudulent websites discovered by a researcher at Palo Alto Networks’ Unit 42 analysis team. From a report: The scam, which sold products like weight loss pills, used breached websites to add legitimacy to its sales and involved using fake celebrity endorsements. Jeff White, the researcher at Unit 42, started researching the network of sites more than 2 years ago when he noticed spam messages that looked visually similar and used similar language. The products were sold on commission as part of an affiliate marketing program and used low initial pricing and tiny print to get people signed up for costly subscriptions. The sales took place on hacked GoDaddy websites, where hackers had set up subdomains on legitimate websites.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/BiTT0l3eJx8/godaddy-removes-a-massive-network-of-bogus-sales-sites

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Luminary ‘retooling’ after podcasters request removal from service

Last month, a New York Times piece heralded the arrival of Luminary. The story focused on the startup’s healthy funding (almost $100 million) and its “subscription-based business model that it hopes will push the medium into a new phase of growth.” You’d be hard-pressed to find better circumstances under which to launch your startup.
A month and a half later, Luminary is live, and most of that good will seems to have evaporated. A number of prominent podcast hosts have requested that their shows be pulled from the “Netflix of podcasts.”

Ben, to be clear, we are not re-hosting your file. We respect and support open feed podcasting: https://t.co/3nUK13V25O
— Luminary (@hearluminary) April 25, 2019

The $8 a month premium service has added shows to its walled-off network without the permission of creators. There are several TechCrunch shows up there, including Original Content, Mixtape, Equity and several now defunct titles. My personal podcast somehow


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How to Install October CMS with Nginx on Fedora 29

October CMS is a free, open-source, self-hosted CMS platform based on the Laravel PHP Framework. In this tutorial, we will go through the October CMS installation on Fedora 29 system by using Nginx as a web server, MariaDB as a database server, and optionally you can secure transport layer by using acme.sh client and Let’s Encrypt certificate authority to add SSL support.


Original URL: https://www.howtoforge.com/how-to-install-october-cms-platform-on-fedora-29/

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Elsevier agrees to first read-and-publish deal

In a move that could signal the beginning of a significant shift for its business model, publisher Elsevier has agreed to its first “read-and-publish” deal with a national consortium of universities and research institutions in Norway.

Rather than paying separately to access content behind paywalls and make selected individual articles immediately available to the public, the Norwegian consortium has signed a deal that rolls the two costs into one.

This new kind of “big deal” is a big deal because there are a growing number of librarians and negotiators who believe this model will reduce subscription costs while boosting open-access publications. Eventually, some believe, the model could eliminate paywalls altogether.

So-called read-and-publish deals are gaining traction but are still highly unusual. Many publishers have been slow to embrace the model, fearing the long-term impact it may have on their income. That said, Springer Nature, Wiley and Taylor and Francis have all struck a


Original URL: http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2019/04/24/elsevier-agrees-first-read-and-publish-deal

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Linux v5.1 rc6

Linus Torvalds: It’s Easter Sunday here, but I don’t let little things like random major religious holidays interrupt my kernel development workflow.


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10 Most Used Nginx Commands Every Linux User Must Know

Nginx (pronounced Engine x) is a free, open-source, high-performance, scalable, reliable, full-featured and popular HTTP and reverse proxy server, a mail proxy server, and a generic TCP/UDP proxy server. Nginx is well known for…
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