How I changed the law with a GitHub pull request

Enlarge / The DC Council meets at the John A. Wilson building. (credit: Wally Gobetz / Flickr)
Recently, I found a typo in the District of Columbia’s legal code and corrected it using GitHub. My feat highlights the groundbreaking way the District manages its legal code.
As a member of the DC Mayor’s Open Government Advisory Group, I was researching the law that establishes DC’s office of open government, which issues regulations and advisory opinions for the District’s open meetings law (OMA) and open records law (FOIA). The law was updated last month, and something seemed to have changed: there was no longer a reference to issuing advisory opinions for FOIA. Comparing the DC Code to the act that made the change, I noticed that something was amiss in section (d):

(credit: dccouncil.us)

(d) The Office of Open Government may issue advisory opinions on the implementation of subchapter I of Chapter 5 of Title 2.
It had a


Original URL: https://arstechnica.com/?p=1415967

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Washington DC Made GitHub Its Official Digital Source For Laws

“Recently, I found a typo in the District of Columbia’s legal code and corrected it using GitHub,” writes D.C. based “civic hacker” Joshua Tauberer, adding “My feat highlights the groundbreaking way the District manages its legal code.”
The District does something with its legal code that no other jurisdiction in the world does (to my knowledge): it publishes the law on GitHub…. This isn’t a copy of the DC law. It is an authoritative source. It is where the DC Council stores the digital versions of enacted laws, and this source feeds directly into the Council’s DC Code website…. This is a milestone in the advancement of open government and open legal publishing.
No one should expect that editing the law on GitHub is going to become the new normal, however. My edit wasnâ(TM)t substantive. This sort of “technical correction,” as lawyers would call it, didnâ(TM)t need to be passed


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/mlP0UtZfh3w/washington-dc-made-github-its-official-digital-source-for-laws

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Two Linux Kernels Revert Performance-Killing Spectre Patches

Friday Greg Kroah-Hartman released stable point releases of Linux kernel 4.19.4, as well as 4.14.83 and 4.9.139. While they were basic maintenance updates, the 4.19.4 and 4.14.83 releases are significant because they also reverted the performance-killing Spectre patches (involving “Single Thread Indirect Branch Predictors”, or STIBP) that had been back-ported from Linux 4.20, according to Phoronix:

There is improved STIBP code on the way for Linux 4.20 that by default just applies STIBP to SECCOMP threads and processes requesting it via prctl() but otherwise is off by default (that behavior can also be changed via kernel parameters). Once that code is ready to go for Linux 4.20, we may see it then back-ported to these stable trees.
Aside from reverting STIBP, these point releases just have various fixes in them as noted for 4.19.4, 4.14.83, and 4.9.139.
Last Sunday Linus Torvalds complained that the performance impact of the STIPB


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/ePv4_iFWvy0/two-linux-kernels-revert-performance-killing-spectre-patches

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