New – Redis 5.0 Compatibility for Amazon ElastiCache

Earlier this year we announced Redis 4.0 compatibility for Amazon ElastiCache. In that post, Randall explained how ElastiCache for Redis clusters can scale to terabytes of memory and millions of reads and writes per second! Other recent improvements to Amazon ElastiCache for Redis include:
Read Replica Scaling – Support for adding or removing read replica nodes to a Redis Cluster, along with a reduction of up to 40% in cluster creation time.
PCI DSS Compliance – Certification as Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS) compliant. This allows you to use ElastiCache for Redis (engine versions 4.0.10 and higher) to build low-latency, high-throughput applications that process sensitive payment card data.
FedRAMP Authorized and Available in AWS GovCloud (US) – United States government customers and their partners can use ElastiCache for Redis to process and store their FedRAMP systems and data for mission-critical, high-impact workloads in the AWS GovCloud (US)


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/AmazonWebServicesBlog/~3/hRs7GSEzw_4/

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The Next Version of HTTP Won’t Be Using TCP

“The HTTP-over-QUIC experimental protocol will be renamed to HTTP/3 and is expected to become the third official version of the HTTP protocol, officials at the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) have revealed,” writes Catalin Cimpanu via ZDNet. “This will become the second Google-developed experimental technology to become an official HTTP protocol upgrade after Google’s SPDY technology became the base of HTTP/2.” From the report: HTTP-over-QUIC is a rewrite of the HTTP protocol that uses Google’s QUIC instead of TCP (Transmission Control Protocol) as its base technology. QUIC stands for “Quick UDP Internet Connections” and is, itself, Google’s attempt at rewriting the TCP protocol as an improved technology that combines HTTP/2, TCP, UDP, and TLS (for encryption), among many other things. Google wants QUIC to slowly replace both TCP and UDP as the new protocol of choice for moving binary data across the Internet, and for good reasons, as test have


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/WQgp3yXb_nE/the-next-version-of-http-wont-be-using-tcp

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The next version of HTTP won’t be using TCP

Enlarge (credit: Andy Maguire / Flickr)
The next version of the Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP)—the network protocol that defines how browsers talk to Web servers—is going to make a major break from the versions in use today.
Today’s HTTP (versions 1.0, 1.1, and 2) are all layered on top of TCP (Transmission Control Protocol). TCP, defined as part of the core set of IP (Internet Protocol) layers, provides reliable, ordered, and error-checked delivery of data over an IP network. “Reliable” means that if some data goes missing during transfer (due to a hardware failure, congestion, or a timeout), the receiving end can detect this and demand that the sending end re-send the missing data; “ordered” means that data is received in the order that it was transmitted in; “error-checked” means that any corruption during transmission can be detected.
These are all desirable properties and necessary for a protocol such as HTTP, but


Original URL: https://arstechnica.com/?p=1410285

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How to Install OpenSSH Server from Source in Linux

OpenSSH is a free and open source, full implementation of the SSH protocol 2.0. It provides a number of tools for securely accessing and managing remote computer systems, and managing authentications keys, such as…
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Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/tecmint/~3/J185myl3uRM/

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