Why Doctors Hate Their Computers

Digitization promises to make medical care easier and more efficient. But are screens coming between doctors and patients? Here’s an excerpt by Atul Gawande of The New Yorker, which talks about the deployment of Epic, a new medical software which cost Partners HealthCare a staggering $1.6 billion, panned out: On May 30, 2015, the Phase One Go-Live began. My hospital and clinics reduced the number of admissions and appointment slots for two weeks while the staff navigated the new system. For another two weeks, my department doubled the time allocated for appointments and procedures in order to accommodate our learning curve. This, I discovered, was the real reason the upgrade cost $1.6 billion. The software costs were under a hundred million dollars. The bulk of the expenses came from lost patient revenues and all the tech-support personnel and other people needed during the implementation phase. In the first five weeks,


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/RGucwJiS6WY/why-doctors-hate-their-computers

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New Lower-Cost, AMD-Powered M5a and R5a EC2 Instances

From the start, AWS has focused on choice and economy. Driven by a never-ending torrent of customer requests that power our well-known Virtuous Cycle, I think we have delivered on both over the years:
Choice – AWS gives you choices in a wide range of dimensions including locations (18 operational geographic regions, 4 more in the works, and 1 local region), compute models (instances, containers, and serverless), EC2 instance types, relational and NoSQL database choices, development languages, and pricing/purchase models.
Economy – We have reduced prices 67 times so far, and work non-stop to drive down costs and to make AWS an increasingly better value over time. We study usage patterns, identify areas for innovation and improvement, and deploy updates across the entire AWS Cloud on a very regular and frequent basis.
Today I would like to tell you about our latest development, one that provides you with a choice


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/AmazonWebServicesBlog/~3/aY7g6_mDIDQ/

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Strange snafu misroutes domestic US Internet traffic through China Telecom

Enlarge (credit: Oracle)
China Telecom, the large international communications carrier with close ties to the Chinese government, misdirected big chunks of Internet traffic through a roundabout path that threatened the security and integrity of data passing between various providers’ backbones for two-and-a-half years, a security expert said Monday. It remained unclear if the highly circuitous paths were intentional hijackings of the Internet’s Border Gateway Protocol or were caused by accidental mishandlings.
For almost a week late last year, the improper routing caused some US domestic Internet communications to be diverted to mainland China before reaching their intended destination, Doug Madory, a researcher specializing in the security of the Internet’s global BGP routing system, told Ars. As the following traceroute from December 3, 2017 shows, traffic originating in Los Angeles first passed through a China Telecom facility in Hangzhou, China, before reaching its final stop in Washington DC. The problematic route, which


Original URL: https://arstechnica.com/?p=1407183

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